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Biosecurity Protects Islands

Without island biosecurity pests will rapidly recolonize islands from which they have been eradicated, or worse still colonise islands for the first time. Only with a rigorous audited biosecurity programme can pest-free status be maintained.

Walking For Lions Project ‘Lights Up’ Big Cat Protection

While the world mourns and avenges the death of Zimbabwe’s beloved Cecil the lion, one man is on the ground in Botswana protecting lions from the angry guns of local farmers and ranchers. Marnus Roodbol is the founder of Walking for Lions (WFL), an organization that works with locals in Botswana to literally light up…

Can an Elephant Called Penelope Petunia Save Her Own Kind?

By Tracy Tullis Adults often say that today’s children will inherit the problems that previous generations have created—especially our degraded environment­—and that it’ll be up to them to find solutions and make things right. Students at PS 107, an elementary school in Brooklyn, New York, are getting a head start. This spring, the fifth graders…

The Nuclear Family: New Book Examines Two Sides of the Atomic Bomb

From an early age I thought it was strange that my family had a connection to both sides of the atomic bombs, in a very intimate way. I hoped to write a book that showed one of the most important events in human history had more then one viewpoint. As the world becomes more connected, and…

Heavy Metals in Motor Oil Have Heavy Consequences

By: Annie Reisewitz and Sarah Martin We’ve all heard the old adage, “Oil and water don’t mix.” Yet we are constantly mixing the two, it seems, hoping that one day they will indeed mix. Add in drought and pollution and the potential environmental problems grow even larger. Every year 10 billion gallons of liquid petroleum,…

What the River Knows: Bagmati River, Nepal

The Bagmati River at Pushupatinath Temple, Katmandu, Nepal

I am clogged with human ash and bits of bone. Garlands of marigolds float on my body as an old monkey watches. I have always borne the remains of the dead, who are taken to the Pashupatinath Temple on my banks near Kathmandu, Nepal, placed on pyres, ignited, and blessed in Hindu ceremonies. The cremated are swept into my murky waters to plod along toward the confluence with the great mother Ganga as I join other tributaries downstream.

Honoring the Men and Women Who are at the Frontlines of Conservation

On World Ranger Day, we laud the men and women who risk their lives to protect wildlife and wild places around the world.

Cave Art May Show What Happened to Giant Lemurs

Ghostly figures in charcoal appear to show a now extinct primate from Madagascar succumbing to a human hunter.

Hunting Lions for Fun

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence and filmmaker Dereck Joubert, a world-renowned expert on lions and the African wilderness, shoots down the myths trophy hunters use to justify killing big cats. He reveals the devastating impact on African economies, employment, and ecology that hunting inflicts at the cost of the much greater wealth that may be generated from ecotourism, and he calls for support of the petition of the U.S. Government to list the lion as an Endangered Species, which would make it illegal to import lions and their parts (such as trophies) into the U.S.

Photographer Steve Winter’s 5 Wildest Big Cat Encounters

Even in a life filled with amazing moments, there’s always a few that stand out.

Studies Make Predictions of How to Comply, What to Look for in Final Clean Power Plan

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is slated to release the final version of its Clean Power Plan, regulating emissions from existing power plants, any day now. Many are already predicting changes, some that could be significant. A survey by E&E publishing revealed stakeholders expect timing to be the element most likely to change in…

Inspiring Ocean Protection Through Photography

At the height of summer many of us are dreaming of cool ocean breezes, swimming in lakes, and playing in rivers.  Our ocean and inland waters provide endless opportunities for recreation, and also endless opportunities to appreciate the beauty – and vulnerability – of the resource that sustains our planet. We know that photography has…

New Study Showed Spawning Frequency Regulates Species Population Networks on Coral Reefs

New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species’ network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science used a computer model developed by…

World of Dances #13

This post is the latest in the World of Dances series, which profiles ballet and dance photography in iconic, architectonically unique, culturally emblematic, rapidly vanishing landmarks or simply unexpected locations, that Kike captures about during his travels.     Dancers: Claire Mazza and Morgan Stinnett Ballet: Connecticut Ballet Location: Cockaponset State Park (Connecticut) Learn more about World of Dances Print Collection Follow Kike Calvo on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Web, or LinkedIn  …

Study of ‘Senior Citizen’ Marine Snails Uncovered How Nerve Cells Fail During Learning

A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers’ findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans. Scientists performed tail reflex experiments on the hatchery-reared…