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Ancestors’ Knowledge Helps Keep These Kids ‘Strong’

A recent NG Genographic Legacy Fund project is preserving generations of stories and information associated with medicine in Madagascar.

C40 Latin American Mayors Forum Showcases Region’s Bold Climate Leadership

Today C40 held its first-ever Latin American Mayors Forum, hosted by Buenos Aires Mayor Mauricio Macri and attended by more than 15 mayors and vice-mayors from the region. During the Forum, it was announced that 20 Latin American mayors have joined the Compact of Mayors, and 20 global C40 cities have committed to pursuing clean buses.…

Huge, Rare Vultures Make Impressive Flying Journeys

Traveling 125 miles by your own power might take a human a week a more to complete. For Ruppell’s vultures, with an 8-ft wingspan, it’s a mere day trip.

Exciting New Prospects for Crocodile Conservation in Cuba

By Natalia Rossi

President Obama’s decision to normalize U.S. diplomatic relations with Cuba has focused attention on a possible end to the two nations’ long political estrangement. Yet despite the enduring diplomatic impasse, for years many of us in the U.S. conservation community have worked hand in hand with our counterparts in Cuba (with the permission of both governments) to preserve that nation’s globally important biodiversity. That collaboration provides a blueprint for new efforts to secure the protection and management of the most pristine mangrove ecosystems in the entire Caribbean region and the magnificent crocodile species they sustain.

Supreme Court Reviews EPA’s Power Plant Mercury Rule; Decision Due in June

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week in a challenge to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) consideration of cost impacts when developing the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard, (MATS) which are set to go into effect next month. At issue in the case is whether the Clean Air Act requires the EPA…

Short Film Showcase: Staying Afloat on a Drowning Island

A tiny island in the bayous of southern Louisiana is slowly disappearing due to rising seas and coastal erosion. Hear how the last remaining residents of Isle de Jean Charles are coping with a foreboding future in filmmaker Emmanuel Vaughan-Lee’s haunting portrait of a community on the edge of extinction.  Vaughan-Lee has two other films featured in…

Scenes from Neza: Mexico’s Self-Made City

Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl is the ur-informal settlement of metropolitan Mexico City. Built just over the line from the Distrito Federal in the Estado de México, Neza—as it is commonly called—looms large in the imagination of the city. From its beginnings as an illegally developed, planned, and built settlement in the late forties, Neza has served as…

Palau’s Reefs: Journey from Destruction to Recovery

Written by Alison Barrat and Andy Bruckner On a scientific expedition to Palau this January we saw thriving coral reefs that contained many species of large, healthy corals, and only a few miles away we found desolate looking reefs that had virtually no coral at all. Our science team recorded conditions that were optimal for…

Great White Sharks of Gansbaai: No Hooking, No Handling, No Harm

On board with Lindblad Expeditions Southern Africa and Indian Ocean tour. March 23, 2015 – As we began our cruise up the southeast coast of Africa aboard the ship National Geographic Orion, we departed Cape Town, South Africa. Several of us spent the day on an outing with Marine Dynamics out of Gansbaai to see…

“Beyond Boundaries” Into The Wilderness

INK Talks is an inspirational conference platform committed to spreading disruptive ideas and inspiring stories from the most unexpected sources. At INK 2014, the speakers were asked to describe why and how they were going “beyond boundaries” in their own work and daily lives… Please watch and share this INK talk: https://youtu.be/Z5RLTzya0v8

The Azores: First Witness to Global Marine Plastic Pollution

Having left Bordeaux on March 15, the Race for Water Odyssey arrived in the Azores on Friday afternoon, the location of the expedition’s first scientific analyses. It is estimated that 80% of pollution in the ocean is plastic. This debris has devastating effects on marine ecosystems and, as a consequence, on human beings. Entanglement, lacerations,…

Shark vs. Cameraman, Ancient Islands, More!

We dive with full grown adult sharks most days and so we are relaxed with these little ones—but it’s not so easy if you are a cameraman and get caught unaware.

Revealing a “Modern-Day Velociraptor”

Peek behind the scenes as science illustrator Jane Kim paints a huge mural showing all the bird families in the world.

March 22, 2015: Understanding Wild Fires, Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail in Winter and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they hitch hike from Tasmania to London, study sleep’s science, count India’s tigers, protect the world’s oceans, hike the length of the Pacific Crest Trail in winter, cook the world, understand forest fires, study the real ingredients of processed foods.

First Global Review of Arctic Marine Mammals Reveals Uncertain Future

Despite Arctic marine mammals being icons of climate change, little is known about their populations across the Arctic. In a first ever global review of Arctic marine mammals, published last week in Conservation Biology, an international team of scientists provides a circumpolar range assessment. They studied population status and trends for 11 species, including polar bears, ice seals, narwhals,…