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Planning for Change in One of the Most Intact Places on Earth

For the first time in Ontario’s Far North, efforts to encourage a regional approach as well as a fundamental transformation in Canadian environmental assessment law may converge. Such a process could unite First Nations, government staff, scientists, and other groups in the shared goal of protecting the ecological and cultural web of life that will sustain the Far North for future generations.

Conservationists Call on Japan to ban all Trade in Ivory

My organization, WildlifeDirect, recently became aware of the scale of laundering of illegal ivory in the ivory markets of Japan through its contact with the Japanese NGO Tears of the African Elephant. Please see more about the interview we did on NTV Wild via this link: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Cvsj21F_FI4 (or watch the video embedded on top of this post). We…

Book saves bird’s life: The story of Albie the Albatross

Co-authored by Erica Cirino About a year and a half ago, Melissa Ursey was riding in the car as her husband Jerry drove across the Southern California desert back to their home in Rancho Mirage from their friends’ house in Desert Springs. As the car cruised through the town of Palm Desert, Jerry noticed something…

Study: Glacial Lakes Appearing in Antarctica

Antarctica is home to Earth’s largest ice mass, which unlike the Arctic remains frozen year round. But a new satellite-based study in the journal Geophysical Research Letters shows that atop the coastal Langhovde Glacier in East Antarctica’s Dronning Maud Land, large numbers of meltwater lakes have been forming. The study suggests that the lakes—nearly 8,000…

NPS Centennial: Celebrating Conservation Worldwide

As we celebrate the centennial anniversary of the National Parks Service and look at the effect that protected lands and parks around the world have had on those who visit them, we see that protected lands are far more valuable than simply providing a place for a camping trip. The protected lands around the world enable people to wonder, to study, and to share their experiences with others through conservation and inspiration, though they may be a world apart.

National Parks on Bucket List for 4 out of 5 Americans This Year

According to a recent AAA survey, 79 percent of Americans say they are as likely (42 percent) or more likely (37 percent) to visit a national park in the next 12 months. America’s “best idea,” the National Parks have never been more popular than they are today, when the U.S. National Park Service celebrates the 100th anniversary of its founding.

When Poverty and Marine Conservation Are Linked, Start a Responsible Fishing Movement

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. Imagine, for a moment, that you’re…

Diving Deep Below Arctic Ice to Bring Back Our Ocean’s Skeletons: #bestjobever

Polar expeditions to explore the ocean are not for the faint of heart. Above the water’s surface, you better be on alert for polar bears. Below, you better be game for diving 60 feet under sea ice into freezing temperatures. Watch National Geographic grantee Branwen Williams lead a team to the Canadian Arctic to do both in an effort to better understand how our oceans and the climate are changing over time.

Citizen scientists give NPS 100,000+ biodiversity records for 100th birthday

Today, the U.S. National Park Service turns 100 years old. The National Park Service has been celebrating all year by organizing over 100 BioBlitzes to document the species living in our national parks, recreation areas, monuments, and historic sites. In addition to the BioBlitzes, NPS has been working with iNaturalist to keep track of biodiversity…

Transforming Conservation in China with ‘Land Trust Reserves’

By Charles Bedford, The Nature Conservancy’s Regional Managing Director, Asia Pacific Region, and Dr. Jin Tong, The Nature Conservancy’s Science Director, China Program In 2012 in China, the 27,325-acre Laohegou Land Trust Reserve, was designed to link several existing reserves in Sichuan’s Pingwu County—home to golden snub-nosed monkeys, Asian golden cats and the highest density of endangered…

A Market-Based Strategy for Sustainable Water Management

By Brian Richter, Chief Scientist, Water, The Nature Conservancy Australia is one of the driest inhabited places on Earth. Yet nearly two-thirds of the country’s land area is devoted to agriculture, generating 93 percent of the domestic food supply. The country is only able to sustain this level of food production through irrigation and an…

Frank Ocean Versus the Actual Ocean

  It’s nice that Frank Ocean just released his long-anticipated new album, ‘Blond’, that some say is truly awesome. But the fact that his name linked to 12 of 20 articles on Google’s News search under the word ‘ocean’ on Sunday and on Monday had proportionately grown to 6 out of 9 ‘ocean’ news stories might also…

A week to Change: Phoenix Zoo and Jane Goodall Institute Join Forces to Improve Animal Welfare Around the World

In some zoos of foreign countries with limited knowledge and funding, animals are often found alone in sterile environments, on bare concrete floors and with no “furniture” (climbing structures, resting platforms, visual barriers and the like). Many times they are malnourished, injured and have a variety of behavioral problems. To complicate matters further, when I visit one of these zoos, I typically have only one week to make improvements. In the remaining time, it is my responsibility to assess, negotiate and improvise to make immediate changes with limited available resources.

Involving Communities in the Fight Against Wildlife Crime

It is in the hearts and minds of people at the grass roots as much as with ministers in the corridors of power and poachers in the field that the battle against wildlife crime has to be fought – and won.

Sharing Kenya’s Wilderness With Underprivileged City Children Uplifts, Inspires Everyone

World elephant Day celebration in Samburu Reserve with 91 children from Kenya’s poor neighbourhoods, slums and rural areas was probably the most moving experience of my life. The children experienced a real safari, in a four-wheel-drive vehicle. They camped for the first time in their lives, and they met wild wild animals in the wilderness of Samburu. But it was also a first for my team of staff, interns and volunteers who put on an ambitious three-day program – something we have never done before. In our first meeting the group of 20 enthusiasts created a trip of discovery, play and learning for the children. My rule was that it must be the same for all the staff too.