VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Why I Love Mornings in the Bush

I love to wake up in the bush to the chorus of a new day. My mind is clear from a night of rest and the morning bird song carries far in the fresh air. It’s like nature is broadcasting in Dolby Digital, and my senses feel almost superhuman. During a walking trail in the Luangwa Valley…

The Race to Find Fish Feeds That Don’t Bankrupt the Ocean

Wild fisheries are stable at best and declining at worst. That means we need aquaculture to meet the world’s growing demand for protein. And to feed the world sustainably, the industry has to figure out how to feed farmed fish without using wild fish stocks. Fish feed stood out in our Fish 2.0 Market Report research as a huge opportunity for innovation. Most farmed fish need some form of prepared feed…

Invasive Ants Eradicated from Tiritiri Island

Ants are often an unwelcome pest species, particularly on islands, and so its great news this week that one of the world’s worst invasive ant species – the Argentine ant, has been successfully eradicated from Tiritiri Island.

Is Zootopia Creating Demand for Pet Fennec Foxes in China? (SPOILER: Probably Not)

You might have heard that Disney’s newest blockbuster, Zootopia (titled Zootropolis in some European countries), is driving a “huge demand for fennec foxes as pets” in China. What you probably have not read is the evidence to support such headlines. And the reason for that is simple: there isn’t any. It is time to stop…

Sending our pollution problems down stream

I was planning to travel to St. Martin and Saba for vacation recently. I was excited to go scuba diving again, swim with the turtles, and to once again explore the underwater world that I work to protect. Unfortunately, that plan didn’t take off. Still, I had the days off, so I decided it was…

Bucking the Trend: Lion Recoveries on Community Lands

By Fred Nelson Maliasili Initiatives The news on lion population trends across Africa in recent years has been consistently gloomy. Lion numbers are estimated to have declined by more than 40 percent during the past two decades, and up to an additional 50 percent decline is forecast for the next twenty years. Lions are extinct or…

Ten Out of Ten BioBlitzes for Bug Scientist Gary Hevel

Smithsonian entomologist Gary Hevel is the only scientist to have attended every one of the ten annual BioBlitzes organized by the National Park Service and the National Geographic Society in the run up to this year’s NPS centennial.

As he did for the previous BioBlitzes, he brought with him thousands of mounted insect specimens he collected in his backyard in Silver Spring, Maryland.

Earth Conservation Corps Raptor Is Wildlife Ambassador at National Mall BioBlitz

Ronnell Blakeney is a team leader with Earth Conservation Corps, an organization with a mission “to empower our endangered youth to restore the Anacostia River, their communities and their lives.”

Photo Essay: Dacha Season Kicks Off in the Russian Countryside

The “dacha,” or country cottage, is a cultural institution in Russia. The tradition began during the Soviet Union when dachas were given as rewards to good workers. The communities were organized by profession. In St. Petersburg, my friend Katya took me to her grandparents’ dacha. They worked as city planners during the USSR, and their dacha…

Nationwide BioBlitz Records 6,481 Species in 126 U.S. Parks

Scientists identified 6,481 species of plants, animals and other organisms from more than 50,000 observations, many of them by citizen scientists, in the #2016BioBlitz this weekend.

Something Fishy in Washington, D.C.

By Amy Werner Today is World Fish Migration day, a day best celebrated by raising awareness of the importance of open rivers and migratory fish, exactly what Rock Creek Park did at a 2016 BioBlitz fish identification on May 20.  The urban oasis of Rock Creek Park in Washington D.C., is often viewed as containing only…

Togo Slippery Frogs Feared Extinct; Found Living in Hidden Waterfall in Africa

Recent decades have not been kind to amphibian populations throughout the world. As amphibian declines and extinctions keep escalating at an unprecedented rate, it comes as a breath of fresh air when something is discovered that was feared to be lost forever.

Song and Dance Opens National Parks BioBlitz on Washington Mall

“We’re here to honor this beautiful land and the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, and to find out about the Earth that we need to protect together,” National Geographic President and CEO Gary E. Knell said at the opening of the 2016 National Parks BioBlitz today. Knell was speaking at an event on the National Mall,…

#BioBlitz2016 Takeaway: How Geology Shapes Nature in Washington, D.C.

To know how the U.S. national capital area was created geographically — the basic structures formed by millions of years of Earth’s dynamics — is to better understand not only why certain species of plants and animals flourish there, but also why they (and Washington. D.C.) are there at all. Ford Cochran, a professor of geology and environmental science,…

Is it Safe to Visit Fukushima?

FUKUSHIMA, Japan—The majority of the world knows the word “Fukushima” because of the 2011 disaster that crippled its nuclear plant. While the effects of the radiation itself are hard to track, so has been the economic impact on Japan’s third largest prefecture.  Living here as a Fulbright National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellow has given me the chance to see…