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Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #9

Explore the wilderness with us… This week we share the “golden wilderness”! The rich colors and textures of the wild can never be replaced or surpassed. Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When the earth’s last wild places are gone, all we will have are fenced off protected areas dependent on constant intervention to persist and marginalized by the demands of sustained development in emerging markets. Guides, rangers, researchers, ecotourists, photographers, artists and conservationists around the world apply themselves everyday to sharing, studying, photographing, writing about, protecting, conserving and celebrating the “wild” with their guests, co-workers, colleagues, and local communities. These amazing photographs are a window into their world, a world where the lions, elephants, orangutans and leopards still reign supreme and we can dream of that perfect morning in the wilderness.

 

Ranger Diaries and The Bush Boyes have teamed up to bring you the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness”. These stunning photographs are selected from hundreds of submissions and are intended to bring the beauty, freedom and splendor of the wilderness to as many people as possible around the world. Please submit your best photographs from the wildest places to the Bush Boyes wall or Ranger Diaries website, and stand a chance of being featured in the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness” published each week. This initiative is all about SHARING and CARING about wild places. Please “Like” this blog post and share this link with as many people as possible… So begins the “Ranger Revolution”… Anyone can be an “Honorary Ranger” if they share and care about the wilderness, stimulating positive change for wild places around the world… Join the “Ranger Revolution” now!

 

“Like” the Bush Boyes or Ranger Diaries Facebook page before 29 March and you could WIN an amazing SUUNTO Compass!!! Follow both these pages a be eligible to WIN great prizes with the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness”…

 

Beam, by guide Kyle de Nobrega.  Young male lion illuminated by a safari vehicle’s spotlight. Photographed at Lion Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / inthestixx.com / lionsands.com)
Beam, by guide Kyle de Nobrega. Young male lion illuminated by a safari vehicle’s spotlight. Photographed at Lion Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / inthestixx.com / lionsands.com)

 

“There is just one hope for repulsing the tyrannical ambition of civilization to conquer every inch on the whole earth. That hope is the organization of spirited people who will fight for the freedom and preservation of the wilderness.” — Bob Marshall (Co-founder of the Wilderness Society)

 

Savuti Channel leopard by guide Lee Wittam of Essential Africa.  Leopards have a phenomenal diversity of prey species and will feed off creatures ranging from dung beetles to a 900kg (2000lb) eland. Photographed in the Savuti, Botswana. (Lee Wittham / www.essentialafrica.co.za)
Savuti Channel leopard by guide Lee Wittam of Essential Africa. Leopards have a phenomenal diversity of prey species and will feed off creatures ranging from dung beetles to a 900kg (2000lb) eland. Photographed in the Savuti, Botswana. (Lee Wittham / www.essentialafrica.co.za)

 

“The wilderness is a place of rest — not in the sense of being motionless, for the lure, after all, is to move, to round the next bend. The rest comes in the isolation from distractions, in the slowing of the daily centrifugal forces that keep us off balance.” — David Douglas (Scottish botanist)

 

Chobe Sunset, by guide Andrew Schoeman. Photographed in the Chobe National Park, Botswana (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)
Chobe Sunset, by guide Andrew Schoeman. Photographed in the Chobe National Park, Botswana (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)

 

“The love of wilderness is more than a hunger for what is always beyond reach; it is also an expression of loyalty to the earth … the only home we shall ever know, the only paradise we ever need — if only we had the eyes to see.” — Edward Abbey (American writer and naturalist)

 

Early Morning Africa, by guide Zane Engebrecht. Photographed at Lake Panic, Kruger Park, South Africa (Zane Engebrecht / zanewildphoto.com)
Early Morning Africa, by guide Zane Engebrecht. Photographed at Lake Panic, Kruger Park, South Africa (Zane Engebrecht / zanewildphoto.com)

 

“In God’s wildness lies the hope of the world – the great fresh, unblighted, unredeemed wilderness.” — John Muir (American naturalist and co-founder of the Sierra Club)

 

The great wildebeest migration begins, by guide Andrew Schoeman. Over 1.4 million wildebeest are involved in this almighty march across the plains of East Africa. Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)
The great wildebeest migration begins, by guide Andrew Schoeman. Over 1.4 million wildebeest are involved in this almighty march across the plains of East Africa. Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)

 

“If you know wilderness in the way that you know love, you would be unwilling to let it go. We are talking about the body of the beloved, not real estate.” — Terry Tempest Williams (American nature writer)

 

Sparring lechwe, by guide Brendon Cremer. A couple of Lechwe spar in the early morning as the sun rises, the dust from the rest of the herd as they move back towards the marsh adding some great mood and drama to the image. Photographed in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)
Sparring lechwe, by guide Brendon Cremer. A couple of Lechwe spar in the early morning as the sun rises, the dust from the rest of the herd as they move back towards the marsh adding some great mood and drama to the image. Photographed in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)

 

“The Wilderness holds answers to questions man has not yet learned how to ask.” — Nancy Newhall (Conservationist writer and photography critic)

 

Morning dove by guide Andrew Schoeman. A Cape Turtle Dove photographed at sunrise in Etosha National Park, Namibia. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)
Morning dove by guide Andrew Schoeman. A Cape Turtle Dove photographed at sunrise in Etosha National Park, Namibia. (Andrew Schoeman / andrewschoemanphotography.co.za)

 

“When all the dangerous cliffs are fenced off, all the trees that might fall on people are cut down,all of the insects that bite are poisoned… and all of the grizzlies are dead because they are occasionally dangerous, the wilderness will not be made safe. Rather, the safety will have destroyed the wilderness.” — R. Yorke Edwards

 

Desert gem, by guide Gary Parker. This rarely seen pangolin was photographed at Tswalu, Kalahari, South Africa (Gary Parker / tswalu.com)
Desert gem, by guide Gary Parker. This rarely seen pangolin was photographed at Tswalu, Kalahari, South Africa (Gary Parker / tswalu.com)

 

“Plans to protect air and water, wilderness and wildlife are in fact plans to protect man.” — Stewart Udall (Arizona cabinet member)

 

Python ambush, by guide James Haskins. “I came across this scene recently while on game drive along the Boteti River (Makgadikgadi Pans, Botswana). The python is suffocating a red-billed teal in shallow water. Over the years, I have seen pythons in similar situations, strangling birds they have caught on the edge of rivers - they submerge themselves to provide flawless camouflage, and lay in wait for the perfect ambush.” (James Haskins)
Python ambush, by guide James Haskins. “I came across this scene recently while on game drive along the Boteti River (Makgadikgadi Pans, Botswana). The python is suffocating a red-billed teal in shallow water. Over the years, I have seen pythons in similar situations, strangling birds they have caught on the edge of rivers – they submerge themselves to provide flawless camouflage, and lay in wait for the perfect ambush.” (James Haskins)

 

“Wilderness is the raw material out of which man has hammered the artifact called civilization.” — Aldo Leopold (American ecologist, forester, and environmentalist, considered to be father of American wildlife management)

 

Cheetah surveying the Karoo, by guide Etienne Oosthuizen. Photographed at Samara, South Africa (Etienne Oosthuizen / photographicafrica.com / samara.co.za)
Cheetah surveying the Karoo, by guide Etienne Oosthuizen. Photographed at Samara, South Africa (Etienne Oosthuizen / photographicafrica.com / samara.co.za)

 

“As long as there are young men with the light of adventure in their eyes or a touch of wildness in their souls, rapids will be run.” — Sigurd F. Olson (Naturalist author of The Singing Wilderness)

 

Leopard in gold, by guide Gavin Lautenbach. Photographed at Londolozi, Kruger Park, South Africa (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com / londolozi.com)
Leopard in gold, by guide Gavin Lautenbach. Photographed at Londolozi, Kruger Park, South Africa (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com / londolozi.com)

 

“Wilderness itself is the basis of all our civilization. I wonder if we have enough reverence for life to concede to wilderness the right to live on?” — Margaret (Mardy) Murie (Known as “Grandmother of the Conservation Movement,” wife of Olaus Murie)

 

Standing elephant, by guide Etienne Oosthizen. “This 40 year old male is the only one in his herd to have learnt this trick, and it enables him to pick the tastiest, freshest pods from the tree. He has a group of younger fans that follow him around in the hope of collecting scraps.” Photographed in the Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia. (Etienne Oosthizen / photographicafrica.com)
Standing elephant, by guide Etienne Oosthizen. “This 40 year old male is the only one in his herd to have learnt this trick, and it enables him to pick the tastiest, freshest pods from the tree. He has a group of younger fans that follow him around in the hope of collecting scraps.” Photographed in the Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia. (Etienne Oosthizen / photographicafrica.com)

 

“Something will have gone out of us as a people if we ever let the remaining wilderness be destroyed; if we permit the last virgin forests to be turned into comic books and plastic cigarette cases; if we drive the few remaining members of the wild species into zoos or to extinction; if we pollute the last clean air and dirty the last clean streams and push our paved roads through the last of the silence, so that never again will Americans be free in their own country from the noise, the exhausts, the stinks of human and automotive waste.” — Wallace Stegner (American writer, historian, and environmentalist), 1960, from the “Wilderness Letter,” written to the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission, 1960

 

`Which one?’ Photographed by Craig Vedders in the Kgalagadi Transfronteir Park, South Africa/Botswana. (Craig Vedders)
`Which one?’ Photographed by Craig Vedders in the Kgalagadi Transfronteir Park, South Africa/Botswana. (Craig Vedders)

 

“Wilderness is a necessity … They will see what I meant in time. There must be places for human beings to satisfy their souls. Food and drink is not all. There is the spiritual. In some it is only a germ, of course, but the germ will grow.” — John Muir (American naturalist and co-founder of the Sierra Club)

 

Golden leap, by guide Etienne Oosthuizen. “This troop of baboons roosted close to our camp each morning and before they ventured out to forage would sit and warm up in the early morning sunlight. Little things warm up quicker than big things, and soon enough the games amongst the youngsters began”. Photographed in the Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia. (Etienne Oosthuizen / photographicafrica.com)
Golden leap, by guide Etienne Oosthuizen. “This troop of baboons roosted close to our camp each morning and before they ventured out to forage would sit and warm up in the early morning sunlight. Little things warm up quicker than big things, and soon enough the games amongst the youngsters began”. Photographed in the Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia. (Etienne Oosthuizen / photographicafrica.com)

 

“These are islands in time — with nothing to date them on the calendar of mankind. In these areas it is as though a person were looking backward into the ages and forward untold years. Here are bits of eternity, which have a preciousness beyond all accounting.” — Harvey Broome (Co-founder of The Wilderness Society)

 

Springbok and dune, by guide Gavin Lautenbach. Photographed at Sossusvlei, Namibia (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com)
Springbok and dune, by guide Gavin Lautenbach. Photographed at Sossusvlei, Namibia (Gavin Lautenbach / mammothsafaris.com)

 

“To me, a wilderness is where the flow of wildness is essentially uninterrupted by technology; without wilderness the world is a cage.” — David Brower (American environmentalist and mountaineer, founder of the Sierra Club)

 

Black rhino sunset, by guide Ian Lombard. Photographed at Kwandwe, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Throughout most of the 20th century, the Black Rhino was the most numerous of the world's rhino species and at one stage could have numbered around 850,000. Two years ago, a subspecies, the Western black rhino, was declared extinct. The black rhino now numbers around 6000. The last stronghold of the black and white rhinoceros is South Africa, where last year 668 rhinos were killed (compared to 13 in 2007) as well as many humans in order to feed the demand for rhino horn from China and Vietnam. (Ian Lombard)
Black rhino sunset, by guide Ian Lombard. Photographed at Kwandwe, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Throughout most of the 20th century, the Black Rhino was the most numerous of the world’s rhino species and at one stage could have numbered around 850,000. Two years ago, a subspecies, the Western black rhino, was declared extinct. The black rhino now numbers around 6000. The last stronghold of the black and white rhinoceros is South Africa, where last year 668 rhinos were killed (compared to 13 in 2007) as well as many humans in order to feed the demand for rhino horn from China and Vietnam. (Ian Lombard)

 

“The wilderness that has come to us from the eternity of the past we have the boldness to project into the eternity of the future.” — Howard Zahniser (Author of the Wilderness Act), from The Need for Wilderness Areas

 

Cheetah and six cubs, by Albie Venter. “We managed to follow this female with her six cubs for several days. I am glad to say that against all odds all six survived to independence.” Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Albie Venter / africa-unlocked.com)
Cheetah and six cubs, by Albie Venter. “We managed to follow this female with her six cubs for several days. I am glad to say that against all odds all six survived to independence.” Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (Albie Venter / africa-unlocked.com)

 

“We are part of the wilderness of the universe. Some of us think we see this so clearly that for ourselves, for our childres, our continuing posterity, and our fellow men we covet with a consuming intensity the fullness of human development that keeps its contact with wildness.” — Howard Zahniser (Author of the Wilderness Act)

 

Golden elephant, photographed by guide Keith Connelly at Kariega, Eastern Cape, South Africa (Keith Connelly / kariega.com)
Golden elephant, photographed by guide Keith Connelly at Kariega, Eastern Cape, South Africa (Keith Connelly / kariega.com)

 

“Many of our greatest American thinkers, men of the caliber of Thomas Jefferson, Henry Thoreau, Mark Twain, William James, and John Muir, have found the forest and effective stimulus to original thought.” — Bob Marshall (Co-founder of the Wilderness Society)

 

Jungle gym, by guide James Kydd. There is a small pride of lions known to the Londolozi guides as the Tsalala pride that have survived the last decade against impossible odds under the leadership of a single lioness and her two daughters. Photographed at Londolozi, Kruger Park, South Africa. (James Kydd / rangerdiaries.com / londolozi.com)
Jungle gym, by guide James Kydd. There is a small pride of lions known to the Londolozi guides as the Tsalala pride that have survived the last decade against impossible odds under the leadership of a single lioness and her two daughters. Photographed at Londolozi, Kruger Park, South Africa. (James Kydd / rangerdiaries.com / londolozi.com)

 

“What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another.” — Mahatma Gandhi

 

Lioness and cubs in the water, by guide Lee Whittam. Photographed in the Linyanti, Botswana.  “Lions don't enjoy the water crossings, the threat of crocodiles in this area always makes the prides cross with a bit more haste.” (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.co.za)
Lioness and cubs in the water, by guide Lee Whittam. Photographed in the Linyanti, Botswana. “Lions don’t enjoy the water crossings, the threat of crocodiles in this area always makes the prides cross with a bit more haste.” (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.co.za)

 

Destroying rainforest for economic gain is like burning a Renaissance painting to cook a meal.”– Edward O. Wilson (an American biologist, researcher, theorist, naturalist and author)

 

Leopard on the lookout by guide Kyle de Nobrega. Photographed at Lion Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / inthestixx.com / lionsands.com)
Leopard on the lookout by guide Kyle de Nobrega. Photographed at Lion Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Kyle de Nobrega / inthestixx.com / lionsands.com)

 

“I hope the United States of America is not so rich that she can afford to let these wildernesses pass by, or so poor she cannot afford to keep them.” — Margaret (Mardy) Murie (Known as “Grandmother of the Conservation Movement,” wife of Olaus Murie)

 

Carmine colony, by guide Brendon Cremer.  A Southern carmine bee eater flying through the nesting colony on the look out for potential mates. Image captured during a recent photo trip to Kalizo along the Zambezi River, Namibia where thousands of these beautiful birds return every year to nest. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)
Carmine colony, by guide Brendon Cremer. A Southern carmine bee eater flying through the nesting colony on the look out for potential mates. Image captured during a recent photo trip to Kalizo along the Zambezi River, Namibia where thousands of these beautiful birds return every year to nest. (Brendon Cremer / brendoncremerphotography.com)

 

“If we kill off the wild, then we are killing a part of our souls.”– Jane Goodall (International advocate for primate conservation)

 

Lords of the bushveld, by guide Lee Whittam of Essential Africa. Elephants love water, and often herds will pick up their pace when they approach it. Photographed in the Linyanti, Botswana (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.co.za)
Lords of the bushveld, by guide Lee Whittam of Essential Africa. Elephants love water, and often herds will pick up their pace when they approach it. Photographed in the Linyanti, Botswana (Lee Whittam / essentialafrica.co.za)

 

“Nature is not a place to visit. It is home.” ― Gary Snyder (American poet)

 

Huge male leopard tests large python, by Susanne Baden. Photographed at Singita Sabi Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Susanne Baden / singita.com)
Huge male leopard tests large python, by Susanne Baden. Photographed at Singita Sabi Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (Susanne Baden / singita.com)

 

“Every creature is better alive than dead, men and moose and pine trees, and he who understands it aright will rather preserve its life than destroy it.– Henry David Thoreau (American author, poet, philosopher)

 

Waterbuck having a last feed before dark, by guide Keith Connelly. Photographed at Kariega, Eastern Cape, South Africa. (Keith Connelly / kariega.com)
Waterbuck having a last feed before dark, by guide Keith Connelly. Photographed at Kariega, Eastern Cape, South Africa. (Keith Connelly / kariega.com)

 

“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless waste; to others, the most valuable part.”– Aldo Leopold (American ecologist, forester, and environmentalist, considered to be father of American wildlife management)

 

“Every year, my brother (Chris Boyes), Pete (“the Nare”) Hugo, Giles (“Prince William”) Trevethick and I (Dr Steve Boyes) cross the Okavango Delta, top to bottom, on mokoros (dug-out canoes) to survey the distribution and abundance of wetland birds, advocate for World Heritage Status, and share this amazing wilderness with accompanying scientists, explorers and special guests. My wife, Dr Kirsten Wimberger, joined us for the first time this year. No one will forget what happened on the 2012 expedition…”

See: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/07/26/bush-boyes-on-expedition-okavango-wetland-bird-survey/

In 2013, we are embarking on the Okavango River Expedition. This will be a 1,750km odyssey down the Okavango River from the source near Huambo (Angola) all the way down the catchment, across the Caprivi Strip (Namibia), and into Botswana to cross the Okavango Delta via one of our planet’s last untouched wilderness areas. Our objective is to support the Okavango World Heritage Project and achieve UNESCO World Heritage Status for the Okavango Delta and the entire catchment. See: http://www.okavangofilm.com/

 

“Like” the Bush Boyes page and stand a chance to WIN one of two amazing Citizen watches… Go to: http://www.facebook.com/bushboyes

Comments

  1. R C Hamilton
    Umhlanga Rocks KZN
    April 5, 2013, 12:05 pm

    Beautiful visions.

  2. abdul rasheed
    Qatar
    April 1, 2013, 9:08 am

    what Fantastic fotos.very very beautiful.
    Thanks a lot.

  3. Barb Sanko
    Illinois, U.S.
    March 28, 2013, 5:32 am

    Every time I view wildlife photos, especially those of the big cats, my heart pounds with excitement. Dear Lord, please don’t ever allow these magnificent creatures and landscapes to ever disappear from our world. We would then have each lost a significant piece of our humanity and probably caused the death of this planet.

  4. Carla
    Brasil
    March 26, 2013, 4:03 pm

    Fotos magníficas! Excelente trabalho!!!

  5. Curtis Taylor
    U.S.A
    March 26, 2013, 3:24 pm

    These are all great shots. The experience must have been like no other. I would love the opportunity to take shots like these. Keep up the great work.

    Sincerely,
    Curtis

  6. PALLAVI
    India
    March 26, 2013, 11:14 am

    damn cool pics.just lvd it!!!
    nature is truely a treasure chest of beauty and wonders!!!

  7. Gage
    #Swag
    March 26, 2013, 11:06 am

    Yo dawg this be fake, erreone know that we ain’t livin in the 1800 with black and white worlds, erreone knoes dat dawg. My teacher make my homies and me get on to look at this chiz, its fake dawg

  8. Luc Van der Meeren
    Belgium and DRC
    March 26, 2013, 9:03 am

    Wow! Fantastic

  9. ananya dash
    March 26, 2013, 5:51 am

    this pictures and the quotes below describe the true importance and value of wildlife in our lives.I feel so proud to live in this world of beautiful creatures.
    THANKS FOR UPLOADING THESE PHOTOS.

  10. bonnie mann
    potchefstroom, south africa
    March 26, 2013, 12:53 am

    I’m speechless! Specially the elephant that stands. I never ever saw I pic like that! Thank you for sharing! I just LOVE the lords of nature! They r huge but so humble! Thank you thank you thank you!

  11. Chloe Daniels
    United Kingdom
    March 25, 2013, 5:12 pm

    What fantastic photographs they picture the animals beautifully…