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Hangout With Buzz Aldrin and Conrad Anker

Mars, Everest and Beyond

How far would you go to push the boundaries of discovery? What would you risk? From the top of Mount Everest to the surface of the Moon, astronaut Buzz Aldrin and mountaineer Conrad Anker have risked their lives to undertake humankind’s most stunning achievements. (Read Buzz Aldrin’s Op Ed: “Forget the Moon. Let’s go to Mars.”)

Be part of the conversation and join our LIVE Hangout on Air as we talk about the business of risk-taking with the some of the greatest names in exploration.

Send in your questions for the explorers and they may be asked on air. You may even be invited to join the Hangout and ask your questions live. Submit your questions by…

  • Uploading a video question to YouTube with #LetsExplore (submissions due by May 15th)
  • Posting a question on Google+ or Twitter with #LetsExplore or
  • Commenting directly on this blog post

Follow National Geographic on Google+ or return to this blog post to watch the Google+ Hangout Monday, May 2oth at 2 p.m. EDT (7 p.m. UTC).

 

Watch Conrad Anker’s Hangout from Everest Base Camp:

Available From National Geographic Books

Buzz Aldrin: “Mission to Mars: My Vision of Space Exploration”
Conrad Anker: “The Call of Everest”
Watch the trailer for Buzz Aldrin’s “Mission to Mars”:

Other Hangouts From National Geographic

Hangout With Explorers of Land, Sea, and Sky on Earth Day
Hangout With Explorers on All Seven Continents
Astronaut Kevin Ford celebrates Nat Geo’s 125th aboard the International Space Station:

Learn More

Risk-takers Photo Gallery
Quiz: Are You a Risk-taker?

 

Comments

  1. mohammed
    jordan
    March 18, 2:29 pm

    what emotions fills you up when you open the pressure-room door and see the space ?

  2. Jeff Qualls
    Durham, NC
    May 19, 2013, 10:44 pm

    Buzz, if you were 25 or 30 years younger, and you were asked to help lead a one way trip to Mars to begin building a settlement there, do you think you would agree to do it? (Assuming, of course, that you felt we had the proper ships to get there safely, and that we were also sending enough supplies and equipment to build infrastructure so that this settlement would have a fighting chance to surve.)

  3. Anne Olsen
    Montgomery, IL
    May 19, 2013, 1:27 pm

    As I will be watching with my fourth grade elementary students — I am always trying to instill in them to be risk takers in school, were both men risk takers at an early age or did this develop overtime? Did anyone encourage them?

  4. Sarah
    Canada
    May 18, 2013, 12:54 pm

    Sorry I meant to type, “I haven’t done either yet..” obviously haven’t gone to the moon yet… lol!

  5. Sarah
    Canada
    May 18, 2013, 12:52 pm

    Awesome!
    I have done either – yet – but I have done a lot of other adventurism stuff – and plan on much more. Buzz, being an astronaut was always in the back of my mind since childhood… but I wasn’t raised with access or encouragement to things like that… I am a freelance cinematographer/technician now and love it, though can I still become an astronaut? I want to go into space. Where can I access that opportunity now?

  6. Cian O'Regan
    Cork, Ireland
    May 17, 2013, 6:55 pm

    I have a question for Buzz.
    Mr Aldrin, when do you think we will stop sending robotic landers and probes to Mars, and begin sending humans instead- and do you think this can be achieved by 2035? Thank you so much!

  7. Don Paul
    Camp IV
    May 15, 2013, 10:23 pm

    Conrad, as you climb higher and higher, there’s less oxygen and it gets colder. Have mountain climbers learned anything that would help people live on Mars?

    Also, with thousands of people summitting Mt Everest now, climbing miles of fixed ropes and ladders, why hasnt anyone tried to use something like a spacesuit, that’s heated and pressurized inside?

  8. Jean Francois Damon
    Kenya
    May 15, 2013, 8:18 pm

    It might be interesting to mention during the discussion the fact that glaciers and snow are disappearing from the big summits,
    Kilimanjaro will be snowless in 10 years time. Mount Kenya is already close to that.
    Can we learn something from the Mars voyages on how to avoid what happened there?
    Jean Francois Damon
    The Sleeping Warrior Lodge
    Kenya.

  9. Elizabeth N. Visco
    Pacfic Northwest
    May 10, 2013, 5:28 pm

    That one way ticket to ‘MARS’! Public isn’t prepaired to bon vogage ,nor how will they reunite back to Earth? In a waiting trip or unplanned to do bet guess ? Compare to that a bug life’ now ‘ cicadas’ happen in decades! To a venture for humans as a ‘donner party’,yet it sounds wrong ,or to invite public groups ? So don’t explore to settlements planet#62-9 of two or researchers to our arrival future dates!