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Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #13

Explore the wilderness with us… Rhinos are in terrible trouble across Africa. The Kruger National Park, the second oldest protected area on earth, may lose as many as 1,000 rhinos this year! The South African government has reacted by supporting the legal sale of over $100 million of rhino horn. This decision has polarized the African conservation community. The main concern is that the sale stimulates trade by creating the impression that rhino horn is now legal. When massive stockpiles of ivory were sold onto the international market, the price per kg did not go down, and the message that there is now legal sources of ivory was received by the general public in markets like China that “ivory is now legal!” We lost over 25,000 elephant in Africa last year and poaching is escalating. We need to be very careful in making this decision and spend funds from the sale of rhino horn very carefully if we go through with this…

 

Within the next 10-15 years we will see the last-remaining wilderness area on earth dominated by the demands of growing human populations and undermined by accelerated climate change. When the earth’s last wild places are gone, all we will have are fenced off protected areas dependent on constant intervention to persist and marginalized by the demands of sustained development in emerging markets. Guides, rangers, researchers, ecotourists, photographers, artists and conservationists around the world apply themselves everyday to sharing, studying, photographing, writing about, protecting, conserving and celebrating the “wild” with their guests, co-workers, colleagues, and local communities. These amazing photographs are a window into their world, a world where the lions, elephants, orangutans and leopards still reign supreme and we can dream of that perfect morning in the wilderness.

 

Ranger Diaries and The Bush Boyes have teamed up to bring you the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness”. These stunning photographs are selected from hundreds of submissions and are intended to bring the beauty, freedom and splendor of the wilderness to as many people as possible around the world. Please submit your best photographs from the wildest places to the The Bush Boyes Facebook page or Ranger Diaries website, and stand a chance of being featured in the “Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness” published each week. This initiative is all about SHARING and CARING about wild places. Please “Like” this blog post and share this link with as many people as possible… So begins the “Ranger Revolution”… Anyone can be an “Honorary Ranger” if they share and care about the wilderness, stimulating positive change for wild places around the world… Join the “Ranger Revolution” now!

 

Hunting lioness , photographed by Ken Dyball in Etosha National Park, Namibia. (purenaturesafaris.com)
Hunting lioness , photographed by Ken Dyball in Etosha National Park, Namibia. (purenaturesafaris.com)

 

“The elders should come together and teach us the traditional ways so we know what the Earth means to us.” – Pierre Alphonse (Black Lake First Nation)

 

Zebras in a row, by Andy Biggs. Photographed in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania (andybiggs.com)
Zebras in a row, by Andy Biggs. Photographed in the Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania (andybiggs.com)

 

 

“The American Indian is of the soil, whether it be the region of forests, plains, pueblos, or mesas. He fits into the landscape, for the hand that fashioned the continent also fashioned the man for his surroundings. He once grew as naturally as the wild sunflowers, he belongs just as the buffalo belonged….” – Luther Standing Bear Oglala Sioux (1868-1937)

 

 

 

Leopard and vervet monkey by guide Gary Parker. “Over the course of three hours we watched the leopard and monkey pit their tree-climbing skills, acrobatics and intuition against each other.” Read more about this sigthing here: http://bit.ly/14EoFfn. Photographed in the Sabi Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (untamedodyssey.com)
Leopard and vervet monkey by guide Gary Parker. “Over the course of three hours we watched the leopard and monkey pit their tree-climbing skills, acrobatics and intuition against each other.” Read more about this sigthing here: http://bit.ly/14EoFfn. Photographed in the Sabi Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (untamedodyssey.com)

 

“Out of the Indian approach to life there came a great freedom, an intense and absorbing respect for life, enriching faith in a Supreme Power, and principles of truth, honesty, generosity, equity, and brotherhood as a guide to mundane relations.” – Luther Standing Bear Oglala Sioux (1868-1937)

 

Aposematic beauty, by guide Calvin Kotze. A fire-grid burnet moth is able to fly during the day due to the toxins its bright colours are warning potential predators about. Photographed at Ulusaba, Kruger Park, South Africa (ulusaba.com)
Aposematic beauty, by guide Calvin Kotze. A fire-grid burnet moth is able to fly during the day due to the toxins its bright colours are warning potential predators about. Photographed at Ulusaba, Kruger Park, South Africa (ulusaba.com)

 

“You have noticed that everything as Indian does is in a circle, and that is because the Power of the World always works in circles, and everything tries to be round….. The Sky is round, and I have heard that the earth is round like a ball, and so are all the stars. The wind, in its greatest power, whirls. Birds make their nest in circles, for theirs is the same religion as ours….” – Black Elk Oglala Sioux Holy Man (1863-1950)

 

Cheetah chase, by Ken Dyball. A mother cheetah and sub-adult in persuit of a warthog piglet, with the warthog adults considering a retaliation in the background. Photographed in the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. (purenaturesafaris.com)
Cheetah chase, by Ken Dyball. A mother cheetah and sub-adult in persuit of a warthog piglet, with the warthog adults considering a retaliation in the background. Photographed in the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. (purenaturesafaris.com)

 

“Even the seasons form a great circle in their changing, and always come back again to where they were. The life of a man is a circle from childhood to childhood, and so it is in everything where power moves.” – Black Elk Oglala Sioux Holy Man (1863-1950)

 

On the move, by guide Andrew Schoeman. Two male cheetah in the early morning patrolling and scent marking their territory. Photographed at at Phinda Game Reserve, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.
On the move, by guide Andrew Schoeman. Two male cheetah in the early morning patrolling and scent marking their territory. Photographed at at Phinda Game Reserve, Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa.

 

“What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.” – Crowfoot, Blackfoot warrior and orator

 

Mother leopard and cub, by guide Chad Cocking. “Nthombi leopardess and her cub share a cuddle in some long grass on an island in the Nhlaralumi Riverbed.” Photographed at Motswari Game Reserve, Timbavati, South Africa.
Mother leopard and cub, by guide Chad Cocking. “Nthombi leopardess and her cub share a cuddle in some long grass on an island in the Nhlaralumi Riverbed.” Photographed at Motswari Game Reserve, Timbavati, South Africa.

 

“In the beginning of all things, wisdom and knowledge were with the animals, for Tirawa, the One Above, did not speak directly to man. He sent certain animals to tell men that he showed himself through the beast, and that from them, and from the stars and the sun and moon should man learn.. all things tell of Tirawa.” – Eagle Chief (Letakos-Lesa) Pawnee

 

Elephant and water droplets by guide Matthew Copham (safarifootprints.com)
Elephant and water droplets by guide Matthew Copham (safarifootprints.com)

 

All things in the world are two. In our minds we are two, good and evil. With our eyes we see two things, things that are fair and things that are ugly…. We have the right hand that strikes and makes for evil, and we have the left hand full of kindness, near the heart. One foot may lead us to an evil way, the other foot may lead us to a good. So are all things two, all two. – Eagle Chief (Letakos-Lesa) Pawnee

 

Namibian lion, photographed at Etosha National Park by Philip Baertschi (philipbaertschi.ch)
Namibian lion, photographed at Etosha National Park by Philip Baertschi (philipbaertschi.ch)

 

“…everything on the earth has a purpose, every disease an herb to cure it, and every person a mission. This is the Indian theory of existence.” – Mourning Dove Salish (1888-1936)

 

Punching above your weight, photographed by guide James Haskins (wildlandsafaris.com)
Punching above your weight, photographed by guide James Haskins (wildlandsafaris.com)

 

“Children were encouraged to develop strict discipline and a high regard for sharing. When a girl picked her first berries and dug her first roots, they were given away to an elder so she would share her future success. When a child carried water for the home, an elder would give compliments, pretending to taste meat in water carried by a boy or berries in that of a girl. The child was encouraged not to be lazy and to grow straight like a sapling.” – Mourning Dove Salish (1888-1936)

 

Zebra dazzle at sunset, by guide Phill Steffny. Photographed in the Okavango Delta, Botswana (Phill Steffny Safaris)
Zebra dazzle at sunset, by guide Phill Steffny. Photographed in the Okavango Delta, Botswana (Phill Steffny Safaris)

 

“From Wakan-Tanka, the Great Mystery, comes all power. It is from Wakan-Tanka that the holy man has wisdom and the power to heal and make holy charms. Man knows that all healing plants are given by Wakan-Tanka, therefore they are holy. So too is the buffalo holy, because it is the gift of Wakan-Tanka.” – Flat-Iron (Maza Blaska Oglala Sioux Chief)

 

Shoebill, by guide Nicky Silberbauer. “Considered to be one of the five most desirable birds in Africa the shoebill certainly gets my vote for favorite!”. Photographed at Lake Victoria, Tanzania. (nickysilberbauer.com)
Shoebill, by guide Nicky Silberbauer. “Considered to be one of the five most desirable birds in Africa the shoebill certainly gets my vote for favorite!”. Photographed at Lake Victoria, Tanzania. (nickysilberbauer.com)

 

The traditions of our people are handed down from father to son. The Chief is considered to be the most learned, and the leader of the tribe. The Doctor, however, is thought to have more inspiration. He is supposed to be in communion with spirits… He cures the sick by the laying of hands, and payers and incantations and heavenly songs. He infuses new life into the patient, and performs most wonderful feats of skill in his practice…. He clothes himself in the skins of young innocent animals, such as the fawn, and decorated himself with the plumage of harmless birds, such as the dove and hummingbird…” – Sarah Winnemucca Paiute (1844-1891)

 

Cryptic colouration, by guide Calvin Kotze. Can you see the foam-nest frog? Photographed at Ulusaba, Kruger Park, South Africa. (ulusaba.com)
Cryptic colouration, by guide Calvin Kotze. Can you see the foam-nest frog? Photographed at Ulusaba, Kruger Park, South Africa. (ulusaba.com)

 

“The Great Spirit is in all things, he is in the air we breathe. The Great Spirit is our Father, but the Earth is our Mother. She nourishes us, that which we put into the ground she returns to us….” – Big Thunder (Bedagi) Wabanaki Algonquin

 

Giraffe under Acacia tree, by Andy Biggs. Photographed in the Serengeti National Park (andybiggs.com)
Giraffe under Acacia tree, by Andy Biggs. Photographed in the Serengeti National Park (andybiggs.com)

 

“… I have seen that in any great undertaking it is not enough for a man to depend simply upon himself.” - Lone Man (Isna-la-wica) Teton Sioux

 

Blue-tailed bee eaters, India,  photographed by Subramanniyan Mani
Blue-tailed bee eaters, India, photographed by Subramanniyan Mani

 

“All birds, even those of the same species, are not alike, and it is the same with animals and with human beings. The reason WakanTanka does not make two birds, or animals, or human beings exactly alike is because each is placed here by WakanTanka to be an independent individuality and to rely upon itself.” – Shooter Teton Sioux

 

10.Lions take down a buffalo, by Brendon Cremer. “We witnessed this buffalo kill from start to finish, from the lions playing at first light to finding the buffalo stalking, and then the kill. It was just like one of those sightings out of the documentaries, a true reflection on the never-ending battles between the relentless enemies of Duba Plains.“ (brendoncremerphotography.com/outdoorphoto.co.za)
10. Lions take down a buffalo, by Brendon Cremer. “We witnessed this buffalo kill from start to finish, from the lions playing at first light to finding the buffalo stalking, and then the kill. It was just like one of those sightings out of the documentaries, a true reflection on the never-ending battles between the relentless enemies of Duba Plains.“ (brendoncremerphotography.com/outdoorphoto.co.za)

 

“If today I had a young mind to direct, to start on the journey of life, and I was faced with the duty of choosing between the natural way of my forefathers and that of the… present way of civilization, I would, for its welfare, unhesitatingly set that child’s feet in the path of my forefathers. I would raise him to be an Indian!”- Tom Brown, Jr., The Tracker

 

Anyone there? Lone elephant photographed by Frederick van Heerden (frederick.photium.com)
Anyone there? Lone elephant photographed by Frederick van Heerden (frederick.photium.com)

 

“We learned to be patient observers like the owl. We learned cleverness from the crow, and courage from the jay, who will attack an owl ten times its size to drive it off its territory. But above all of them ranked the chickadee because of its indomitable spirit.” – Tom Brown, Jr., The Tracker

 

Rocky Ridge, by guide Jono Harper. “Looking back at the leopard I noticed it was focused on this weak young elephant calf. A few minutes later the cow decided to move to a nearby thicket to start feeding while keeping a good eye on the calf. It was at this time the opportunistic cat decided to make its move.  It sneaked up to the calf without making a sound, and then throttled the calf by its neck. The calf’s distress call alerted the cow which came stampeding in, and threw her trunk at the leopard which managed to dart away without being touched. It ran to the nearest tree which the cow proceeded to crash down sending the leopard flying out and bouncing up some rocks where the elephant could not get to.” Read more of this story here: http://bit.ly/11Qe9gf. Photographed at Lion Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (lionsands.com)
Rocky Ridge, by guide Jono Harper. “Looking back at the leopard I noticed it was focused on this weak young elephant calf. A few minutes later the cow decided to move to a nearby thicket to start feeding while keeping a good eye on the calf. It was at this time the opportunistic cat decided to make its move. It sneaked up to the calf without making a sound, and then throttled the calf by its neck. The calf’s distress call alerted the cow which came stampeding in, and threw her trunk at the leopard which managed to dart away without being touched. It ran to the nearest tree which the cow proceeded to crash down sending the leopard flying out and bouncing up some rocks where the elephant could not get to.” Read more of this story here: http://bit.ly/11Qe9gf. Photographed at Lion Sands, Kruger Park, South Africa. (lionsands.com)

 

“When you know who you are; when your mission is clear and you burn with the inner fire of unbreakable will; no cold can touch your heart; no deluge can dampen your purpose. You know that you are alive.” – Chief Seattle, Duwamish (1780-1866)

 

Serval kittens, by Ken Dyball, photographed in the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. (purenaturesafaris.com)
Serval kittens, by Ken Dyball, photographed in the Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya. (purenaturesafaris.com)

 

“When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the waters are polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then will you discover you cannot eat money.” – Cree Prophecy

 

Rhinos on the edge of darkness, by guide Keith Connelly. In 2007 13 rhinos were poached in South Africa, the world’s last stronghold of the black and white rhinoceros. In 2010: 333 were poached. 2011: 448 poached. 2012: 668 poached.  We are only half way through 2013 and almost 500 rhinos have been killed for their horns in South Africa alone so far to feed the demand from China and Vietnam.  (Contact us at info@rangerdiaries.com if you want our advice on how to help.)
Rhinos on the edge of darkness, by guide Keith Connelly. In 2007 13 rhinos were poached in South Africa, the world’s last stronghold of the black and white rhinoceros. In 2010: 333 were poached. 2011: 448 poached. 2012: 668 poached. We are only half way through 2013 and almost 500 rhinos have been killed for their horns in South Africa alone so far to feed the demand from China and Vietnam. (Contact us at info@rangerdiaries.com if you want our advice on how to help.)

 

“In our every deliberation, we must consider the impact of our decisions on the next seven generations.” – Iroquois Maxim (circa 1700-1800)

 

Ground pangolin, by guide Kyle de Nobrega. “There are four species of pangolin in Africa and another four in Asia. Their nocturnal behavior and habit of curling into a ball when approached make them extremely difficult to find or spot. There is one place though, tucked in the middle of the southern Kalahari that one may be granted a sight of this amazing animal. Tswalu Kalahari and its vast habitat prime-suited for pangolins coupled with extremely cold nights make this the destination to increase your chances to see them in the daylight. Sub-zero temperatures make life impossible for many insects or mammals including ants and termites forcing species such as aardwolf , aardvark and pangolin to stay above ground during the day.” Photographed at Tswalu, Kalahari, South Africa. See the rest of the images here: http://bit.ly/137Tigs (Tswalu.com/intestxx.com)
Ground pangolin, by guide Kyle de Nobrega. “There are four species of pangolin in Africa and another four in Asia. Their nocturnal behavior and habit of curling into a ball when approached make them extremely difficult to find or spot. There is one place though, tucked in the middle of the southern Kalahari that one may be granted a sight of this amazing animal. Tswalu Kalahari and its vast habitat prime-suited for pangolins coupled with extremely cold nights make this the destination to increase your chances to see them in the daylight. Sub-zero temperatures make life impossible for many insects or mammals including ants and termites forcing species such as aardwolf , aardvark and pangolin to stay above ground during the day.” Photographed at Tswalu, Kalahari, South Africa. See the rest of the images here: http://bit.ly/137Tigs (Tswalu.com/intestxx.com)

 

“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.” – Chief Seattle, Duwamish (1780-1866)

 

4.Leopard and warthog, by guide Keith Connelly of Motswari Game Reserve. “The young Male leopard (Xiviti) was relaxing in a rocky river bed when a group of warthog with little piglets started to make their way down the bank...he got into a perfect position and when the big warthog sow was within half a meter she saw him and charged. He leaped over her to get at the piglets and they sprinted up the bank. He soon gave up and came back down. The warthog sow was calling the piglets from across the river and they ran across slipping into the water. The leopard saw his chance and just as he was about to nab one a huge baboon charged down from the river bank and chased him across the river!!” See the rest of the images here: http://bit.ly/10Q1vxP
4. Leopard and warthog, by guide Keith Connelly of Motswari Game Reserve. “The young Male leopard (Xiviti) was relaxing in a rocky river bed when a group of warthog with little piglets started to make their way down the bank…he got into a perfect position and when the big warthog sow was within half a meter she saw him and charged. He leaped over her to get at the piglets and they sprinted up the bank. He soon gave up and came back down. The warthog sow was calling the piglets from across the river and they ran across slipping into the water. The leopard saw his chance and just as he was about to nab one a huge baboon charged down from the river bank and chased him across the river!!” See the rest of the images here: http://bit.ly/10Q1vxP

 

“Warriors are not what you think of as warriors. The warrior is not someone who fights, because no one has the right to take another life. The warrior, for us, is one who sacrifices himself for the good of others. His task is to take care of the elderly, the defenseless, those who cannot provide for themselves, and above all, the children, the future of humanity.” —Sitting Bull (c. 1831 – 1890), Hunkpapa Sioux.

 

Elephant herd under the roof of Africa., by Marina Cano. Photographed in Ambosli National Park, Kenya (marinacano.com)
Elephant herd under the roof of Africa., by Marina Cano. Photographed in Ambosli National Park, Kenya (marinacano.com)

 

“If a man is as wise as a serpent, he can afford to be as harmless as a dove.” – Cheyenne Proverb

 

Giraffe and our closest star, by guide James Haskins.. Photographed on the Chobe River, Botswana (wildlandsafaris.com)
Giraffe and our closest star, by guide James Haskins.. Photographed on the Chobe River, Botswana (wildlandsafaris.com)

 

“Every time you wake up ask yourself “What good things am I going to do today?” Remember that when the sun goes down at sunset, it will take a part of your life with it.” – Native American proverb

 

Notch and sons, photographed by Ken Dyball.  “We had the choice of going to a cheetah mother and four little cubs or sitting with five very lazy, sleeping male lions. We picked the lions…. and it looked like they would sleep until dark. A strong wind came up so they all got to their feet. One of the sons was a bit aggresive towards Notch (the father on the right). The other three sons were by Notch’s side wanting to join in at anytime! This was a time of testing each other out: a few of them had some recent and deep puncture wounds. Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (purenaturesafaris.com)
Notch and sons, photographed by Ken Dyball. “We had the choice of going to a cheetah mother and four little cubs or sitting with five very lazy, sleeping male lions. We picked the lions…. and it looked like they would sleep until dark. A strong wind came up so they all got to their feet. One of the sons was a bit aggresive towards Notch (the father on the right). The other three sons were by Notch’s side wanting to join in at anytime! This was a time of testing each other out: a few of them had some recent and deep puncture wounds. Photographed in the Masai Mara, Kenya. (purenaturesafaris.com)

 

“Every year, my brother (Chris Boyes), Pete (“the Nare”) Hugo, Giles (“Prince William”) Trevethick and I (Dr Steve Boyes) cross the Okavango Delta, top to bottom, on mokoros (dug-out canoes) to survey the distribution and abundance of wetland birds, advocate for World Heritage Status, and share this amazing wilderness with accompanying scientists, explorers and special guests. My wife, Dr Kirsten Wimberger, joined us for the first time this year. No one will forget what happened on the 2012 expedition…”

See: http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/07/26/bush-boyes-on-expedition-okavango-wetland-bird-survey/

In 2013, we are embarking on the Okavango River Expedition. This will be a 1,750km odyssey down the Okavango River from the source near Huambo (Angola) all the way down the catchment, across the Caprivi Strip (Namibia), and into Botswana to cross the Okavango Delta via one of our planet’s last untouched wilderness areas. Our objective is to support the Okavango World Heritage Project and achieve UNESCO World Heritage Status for the Okavango Delta and the entire catchment. See: http://www.okavangofilm.com/

 

“Like” the Bush Boyes page and stand a chance to WIN one of two amazing Citizen watches… Go to: http://www.facebook.com/bushboyes

 

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Comments

  1. Rosa De cyan
    Spain
    July 17, 2013, 3:15 am

    Es el drama diario en África: o te como, o me comes

  2. alaa eddine
    tunisie
    July 12, 2013, 6:08 am

    nice

  3. samir desani
    Bhavnagar, India
    July 10, 2013, 12:00 am

    That is awesome shots. I know how much passions need for this shots. superb shots!!!!

  4. munir
    ksa
    July 9, 2013, 3:10 pm

    i have a dream to become a professional photographer but sometimes always stays as a dream which we cant make it reality whenever i see such i always think that why i was not there why i have not shoot this pictures i salute for this beautiful creation of god thank you……….

  5. samir desani
    Bhavnagar, india
    July 9, 2013, 12:57 pm

    superb shot!!!!!!
    1000 likes