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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #58

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Tits, “Jacobins”, king-fishers, kites, skimmers, woodcreepers, oystercatchers, nightjars and flycatchers… Sounds like types of people or utensils used to eat wild foods. These amazing wild bird photographs, the first of 2014, are world-class and represent everything the Wild Bird Trust seeks to protect for future generations – the freedom, beauty and security of birds in the wild. Each species has an evolutionary story that, like ours, goes back millions of years and is a living example of the creativity of nature. Wild birds are threatened all over the world with most species with restricted distributional ranges under threat of extinction. We need a global effort to combat with wild-caught bird trade, the capture en masse of migratory birds for food, and ongoing habitat destruction that threatens our birdlife.

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We are proud to bring the wonder and vibrance of wild birds direct to you every week. With your help we plan to publish the Top25s to 1 million people every month by the end of 2014. That is a revolution that will change the world! Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up a camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa.

Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at:

www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25

Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos!

"Strawberries with cream" Red avadavats, red munias or strawberry finches as they are known across their wide distribution across the open fields and grasslands of tropical Asia, showing their amazing breeding pluamge during the Monsoon Season on the Indian Subcontinent. (Vishwas C GM)
“Strawberries with cream” Red avadavats, red munias or strawberry finches as they are known across their wide distribution across the open fields and grasslands of tropical Asia, showing their amazing breeding pluamge during the Monsoon Season on the Indian Subcontinent. (Vishwas C GM)
"Flying tassles" Asian paradise flycatchers are resident breeders in the thick forests and well-wooded habitats of Turkestan to Manchuria, all over the Indian Subcontinent and Sri Lanka, as well as the Malay Archipelago on the islands of Sumba and Alor. (Vishwas C GM)
“Flying tassles” Asian paradise flycatchers are resident breeders in the thick forests and well-wooded habitats of Turkestan to Manchuria, all over the Indian Subcontinent and Sri Lanka, as well as the Malay Archipelago on the islands of Sumba and Alor. (Vishwas C GM)
"Little master" Black jacobins are common residents in or near the Atlantic Forests of E Brazil, Uruguay, E Paraguay, and the far NE of Argentina. (Trevor Kleyn)
“Little master” Black jacobins are common residents in or near the Atlantic Forests of E Brazil, Uruguay, E Paraguay, and the far NE of Argentina. (Trevor Kleyn)
"Dreamscape" Greater flamingoes have a wide global distribution and are photographed here on Lake Uchali in Pakistan. (Tahir's Photography)
“Dreamscape” Greater flamingoes have a wide global distribution and are photographed here on Lake Uchali in Pakistan. (Tahir’s Photography)
"Forest punked" Himalayan black-lored tits are active insectivores and cavity-nesters that are resident breeder in the Himalayas. (Swethadri Doraiswamy)
“Forest punked” Himalayan black-lored tits are active insectivores and cavity-nesters that are resident breeder in the Himalayas. (Swethadri Doraiswamy)
"Lone stalker" Ruddy-breasted crakes are a little-known wetland bird that frequents swamps and wetlands across S Asia from the Indian Subcontinent E all the way to S China, Japan and Indonesia. (Prashant Srivastava)
“Lone stalker” Ruddy-breasted crakes are a little-known wetland bird that frequents swamps and wetlands across S Asia from the Indian Subcontinent E all the way to S China, Japan and Indonesia. (Prashant Srivastava)
"Sign of disturbance" Black kites are widely distributed through the temperate and tropical parts of Eurasia and parts of Australasia and Oceania, dominating disturbed habitat where birdlife has been depleted by human impacts. (Sree Vardhan)
“Sign of disturbance” Black kites are widely distributed through the temperate and tropical parts of Eurasia and parts of Australasia and Oceania, dominating disturbed habitat where birdlife has been depleted by human impacts. (Sree Vardhan)
"Can i have my bill?" Stork-billed kingfishers are widely distributed across the tropical parts of the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia from India and Sri Lanka to Indonesia. They are not a common sighting and often require specialist assistance. (Abu Bakar)
“Can i have my bill?” Stork-billed kingfishers are widely distributed across the tropical parts of the Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia from India and Sri Lanka to Indonesia. They are not a common sighting and often require specialist assistance. (Abu Bakar)
"heli-king-fisher" Pied kingfishers have the unique ability to hover over feeding sites before plunging into the water to catch fish, tadpoles and insects, and have spread across Africa and Asia with this advantageous ability. (Stephen Mostert)
“heli-king-fisher” Pied kingfishers have the unique ability to hover over feeding sites before plunging into the water to catch fish, tadpoles and insects, and have spread across Africa and Asia with this advantageous ability. (Stephen Mostert)
"Snow ghost" Snowy owls are the official bird of Quebec (Canada), breeding in the Arctic tundra of N Alaska, Canada and Eurasia. (Peter Chromik)
“Snow ghost” Snowy owls are the official bird of Quebec (Canada), breeding in the Arctic tundra of N Alaska, Canada and Eurasia. (Peter Chromik)
"Global citizen" Grey herons have one of the widest distributions of any wading bird and can be found throughout temperate Europe and Asia, as well as large parts of Africa. (Sreeji Nair)
“Global citizen” Grey herons have one of the widest distributions of any wading bird and can be found throughout temperate Europe and Asia, as well as large parts of Africa. (Sreeji Nair)
"Abundance of life" Snow geese or "blue geese" breed N of the "timberline" in Greenland, Canada, Alaska and the NE tip of Siberia, wintering in the warmer parts of North America from SW British Columbia through parts of the United States to Mexico. Photographed here after arriving in Victoriaville, Quebec (Canada). (Simon Bolyn)
“Abundance of life” Snow geese or “blue geese” breed N of the “timberline” in Greenland, Canada, Alaska and the NE tip of Siberia, wintering in the warmer parts of North America from SW British Columbia through parts of the United States to Mexico. Photographed here after arriving in Victoriaville, Quebec (Canada). (Simon Bolyn)
"Elegance" Eastern pale or Somali chanting goshawks are found in semi-desert, dry woodlands and savana grasslands in S Ethiopia, Djibouti, W Somalia, E Kenya, NE Tanzania and adjacent Uganda. (Nina Stavlund)
“Elegance” Eastern pale or Somali chanting goshawks are found in semi-desert, dry woodlands and savana grasslands in S Ethiopia, Djibouti, W Somalia, E Kenya, NE Tanzania and adjacent Uganda. (Nina Stavlund)
"Sun god" White-throated kingfishers feed predominantly in trees and have a wide distributed across Eurasia from Bulgaria, Turkey, W Asia all the way E through the Indian Subcontinent to the Philippines. (Nikunj patel)
“Sun god” White-throated kingfishers feed predominantly in trees and have a wide distributed across Eurasia from Bulgaria, Turkey, W Asia all the way E through the Indian Subcontinent to the Philippines. (Nikunj patel)
"Intercontinental flight" Steppe eagles breed from Romania E through S Russia and the central Asian steppes to Mongolia, wintering in Africa and India. (Ritesh Nagare)
“Intercontinental flight” Steppe eagles breed from Romania E through S Russia and the central Asian steppes to Mongolia, wintering in Africa and India. (Ritesh Nagare)
"Two is company, three is a crowd" Lesser flamingos are the smallest species of flamingo and occur in sub-Saharan Africa and India. (Raj Dhage Wai)
“Two is company, three is a crowd” Lesser flamingos are the smallest species of flamingo and occur in sub-Saharan Africa and India. (Raj Dhage Wai)
"Lake specialist" Spot-billed pelicans are "Near-Threatened" and breed in S Asia from S Pakistan across India E to Indonesia, preferring large inland and coastal waters like large lakes. (Poorna Kedar)
“Lake specialist” Spot-billed pelicans are “Near-Threatened” and breed in S Asia from S Pakistan across India E to Indonesia, preferring large inland and coastal waters like large lakes. (Poorna Kedar)
"Feed me!" Black skimmers breed in loose groups on sandbanks and sandy beaches in N and S America with 3-7 heavily dark-blotched buff or bluish eggs incubated by both parents and the resultant chicks leaving the nest as soon as they hatch. (Kelly Hunt)
“Feed me!” Black skimmers breed in loose groups on sandbanks and sandy beaches in N and S America with 3-7 heavily dark-blotched buff or bluish eggs incubated by both parents and the resultant chicks leaving the nest as soon as they hatch. (Kelly Hunt)
"Bust creeping!" The unstudied tawny-winged woodcreeper is found in Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. (Owen Deutsch)
“Bust creeping!” The unstudied tawny-winged woodcreeper is found in Belize, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama. (Owen Deutsch)
"Busy woodpecking..." Golden-fronted woodpeckers are distributed from Texas and Oklahoma in the United States through Mexico to Honduras and northern Nicaragua. (Owen Deutsch)
“Busy woodpecking…” Golden-fronted woodpeckers are distributed from Texas and Oklahoma in the United States through Mexico to Honduras and northern Nicaragua. (Owen Deutsch)
"Still waters" Ruddy shelducks are mostly migratory and winter in the Indian Subcontinent with small resident populations in NW Africa and Ethiopia. (Hrishikesh Jadhav)
“Still waters” Ruddy shelducks are mostly migratory and winter in the Indian Subcontinent with small resident populations in NW Africa and Ethiopia. (Hrishikesh Jadhav)
"Last of the catchers" African (black) oystercatchers have a global population of less than 5,000 adult birds and is endemic to the coasts of South Africa and Namibia. (Edward Peach)
“Last of the catchers” African (black) oystercatchers have a global population of less than 5,000 adult birds and is endemic to the coasts of South Africa and Namibia. (Edward Peach)
"Silent incubator" African paradise flycatchers are common resident breeder in open forests and savannah habitats across sub-Saharan Africa. (Chris Krog)
“Silent incubator” African paradise flycatchers are common resident breeder in open forests and savannah habitats across sub-Saharan Africa. (Chris Krog)
"Day sleeper" Great-eared nightjars are found in the subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests of Indonesia, India, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Abhilash Arjunan)
“Day sleeper” Great-eared nightjars are found in the subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests of Indonesia, India, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. (Abhilash Arjunan)

logo-vectorPlease join the Wild Bird Trust page on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to receive all wild bird photo updates and news from our research and conservation projects in the field. Submit your own photos and become part of this important public awareness campaign to bring the magic of wild birds to the world. Prepare to be blown away every week… The Wild Bird Trust was founded in South Africa in August 2009 with the primary objective of keeping birds safe in the wild. The trust aims to encourage the use of flagship endangered bird species as “ecosystem ambassadors” in their indigenous habitat. The trust focusses on linking ordinary people with conservation action in the field through innovative marketing campaigns and brand development. Saving Africa’s birds is going to take a determined effort from all of us.

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #57″: 

Comments

  1. Daniel
    UK
    January 19, 2:35 pm

    Stunning photos, but where’s number 25?

  2. Luke Smith
    Australia
    January 12, 11:55 pm

    HI Steve, great photos. What hardware we’re you using to take these shots? They all look awesome!

  3. Hara Prasad Mitra
    Kolkata, India.
    January 12, 11:06 pm

    Very nice pictures of birds.

  4. Wesley Goorachan
    Trinidad and Tobago
    January 12, 6:36 am

    I love these pictures and I like animals very much. Keep posting!

  5. Owen Deutsch
    Chicago
    January 10, 2:59 pm

    Thank you Steve, it is always an honor to have my work appear on your prestigious web site.

  6. Sreevardhan Garlapati
    Hyderabad
    January 8, 2:11 pm

    Thank you for selecting my image…that indeed was a great new year’s gift..:-)

  7. Vishwas C.G.M
    Shimoga
    January 8, 12:45 pm

    Thank You Steve Boyes for both the images…!! Truly a wonderful surprise and a great start for the New Year..2014