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Interactive Map: Untamed Patagonia

Patagonia, the legendary land of wildness, fierce winds, and hardy gauchos, easily lives up to the allure of its iconic name. Glacier-fed rivers tumble between jagged, never-climbed mountains. Herds of long-necked guanacos gallop across expansive grasslands as Andean Condors soar overhead.

Since 2004, Conservacion Patagonica has focused on creating the future Patagonia National Park in one of the most ecologically critical areas of this region. This 650,000 acre public-access park will unite Tamango and Jeinemeni National Reserves with the Chacabuco Valley, a former sheep ranch recovering from overgrazing.

We’ve created an interactive map to bring the park to life wherever you are.  Zoom and pan around the map to explore the landscape, dive into immersive panoramas to get a 360˚ view from the ground, and visit points of interest and blog posts from throughout the park. Want to keep up to date on their latest puma tracking and grasslands restoration work? Check back frequently for new and exciting content.  Click here to check out the map.

For anyone who likes the feel of a map in their hands, or the look of a map on the wall, check out our waterproof print map and guide of the park, available at our online store and at Patagonia clothing stores nationwide.

To find out more about our work, visit Maps for Good, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Instagram. We want to thank all those who have supported us in this project, including the National Geographic Expeditions Council, Patagonia, our 210 Kickstarter backers, Wild Gift, Goal Zero, SPOT, and Rise Bar. Thank you!

Click on the image to explore the interactive map.
Click on the image to explore the interactive map.
Waterproof Map & Guide: the Future Patagonia National Park
Click on the image to order the print map and guide to the future Patagonia National Park.
In their three months in the field, Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue collected geographic data and multimedia to create maps of the future Patagonia National Park. Photo by Rick Ridgeway
In their three months in the field, Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue collected geographic data and multimedia to create maps of the future Patagonia National Park.
Photo by Rick Ridgeway
Marty Schnure hikes up the Avilés Valley with small solar panels on her back to keep equipment charged. Photo by Ross Donihue and Marty Schnure.
Marty Schnure hikes up the Avilés Valley with small solar panels on her back to keep equipment charged.
Photo by Ross Donihue and Marty Schnure.
Valle Hermoso and Lago Verde, a remote and stunning part of the Jeinemeni Mountains, part of the future Patagonia National Park.  Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Valle Hermoso and Lago Verde, a remote and stunning part of the Jeinemeni Mountains, part of the future Patagonia National Park.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Marty and Ross make camp beside a high alpine lake.  Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Marty and Ross make camp beside a high alpine lake.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
After just eating a meal of carrion, a male Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) perches on the edge of a cliff face. One of the largest birds on earth, the Andean Condor is a symbol of power, health, and liberty for the people of Patagonia. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
After just eating a meal of carrion, a male Andean Condor (Vultur gryphus) perches on the edge of a cliff face. One of the largest birds on earth, the Andean Condor is a symbol of power, health, and liberty for the people of Patagonia.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Marty Schnure scrambles up a slope of loose rock in the Jeinemeni Mountains.  Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Marty Schnure scrambles up a slope of loose rock in the Jeinemeni Mountains.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
After the first rainstorm in five weeks, evening light illuminates the grasslands as darkness descends on the Chacabuco Valley. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
After the first rainstorm in five weeks, evening light illuminates the grasslands as darkness descends on the Chacabuco Valley.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Ross Donihue refills his water supply in an icy alpine lake. With so few people and such pure water, no water purification is necessary in the park. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Ross Donihue refills his water supply in an icy alpine lake. With so few people and such pure water, no water purification is necessary in the park.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
A full moon glows over the Avilés River Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
A full moon glows over the Avilés River.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Ross Donihue discusses local areas and geographic features with a park ranger. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Ross Donihue discusses local areas and geographic features with a park ranger.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Maiden’s Slipper (Calceolaria unifora) Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Maiden’s Slipper (Calceolaria unifora)
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Marty Schnure looks out on the Chacabuco River. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Marty Schnure looks out on the Chacabuco River.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
A Guanaco surveys his surroundings from his high vantage point. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
A Guanaco surveys his surroundings from his high vantage point.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
With darkness only minutes away, the clouds above Valle Chacabuco are illuminated   in a brilliant display of colors. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
With darkness only minutes away, the clouds above Valle Chacabuco are illuminated in a brilliant display of colors.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Shot from Marty and Ross’s basecamp, a long exposure of the night sky reveals the southern axis of the earth’s rotation. Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure
Shot from Marty and Ross’s basecamp, a long exposure of the night sky reveals the southern axis of the earth’s rotation.
Photo by Ross Donihue & Marty Schnure

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Comments

  1. Charlie
    May 11, 11:29 am

    I wish it was bigger, when i use google earth i get sad when I realise how small oir world is and how big our footprint is.

  2. Mavis
    Singapore
    May 11, 8:18 am

    Sounds like an amazing project! It’ll definitely make map-reading a lot more fun and easy for direction idiots like me.

    http://www.leadmeaway.com

  3. Joel
    Kenya
    May 10, 6:41 pm

    impressive,educative. …thank you for the good work