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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #72

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Firethroats, kingfishers, openbills, nightjars, stilts, leafbirds, roadrunners, mangos, laughthrushes, and rubythroats are featured in this 72nd edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”! With almost 600,000 followers on the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page, the Wild Bird Revolution is accelerating towards our goal of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts by the end of the year… We need your help to achieve this world-changing effort to celebrate the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild. Share your favorite wild bird photographs, invite your friends to join, and support global bird conservation by donating to the Wild Bird Trust.   

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. Our blue-green living planet has seen cataclysms like us before and has always come back after the threat has subsided. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Bird Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

Please help us continue our work by donating to the Wild Bird Trust: http://www.wildbirdtrust.com/donations/ Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at: www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25 Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos!

Blue-eared kingfishers prefer dense shaded forests with small streams across the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia. (PakCik Malek)
Blue-eared kingfishers prefer dense shaded forests with small streams across the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia. (PakCik Malek)
Asian openbills are found in inland wetlands across much of the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia in . (Abhisek Patnaik)
Asian openbills are found in inland wetlands across much of the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia in . (Abhisek Patnaik)
Oriental white-eyes are abundant resident breeders in open woodlands across tropical Asia from the Indian subcontinent to SE Asia, extending all the way to Indonesia and Malaysia. (Abhisek Patnaik)
Oriental white-eyes are abundant resident breeders in open woodlands across tropical Asia from the Indian subcontinent to SE Asia, extending all the way to Indonesia and Malaysia. (Abhisek Patnaik)
White stork breed in Europe up to Finland, NW Africa, SW Asia and S Africa, migrating long distances to winter in Africa from tropical Sub-Saharan Africa all the way to the bottom of South Africa and the Indian subcontinent. (Antonis Tsaknakis)
White stork breed in Europe up to Finland, NW Africa, SW Asia and S Africa, migrating long distances to winter in Africa from tropical Sub-Saharan Africa all the way to the bottom of South Africa and the Indian subcontinent. (Antonis Tsaknakis)
White-throated kingfishers are widely distributed across Eurasia from Bulgaria, Turkey, W Asia all the way E to the Indian subcontinent and the Philippines. (Bidyut Kumar)
White-throated kingfishers are widely distributed across Eurasia from Bulgaria, Turkey, W Asia all the way E to the Indian subcontinent and the Philippines. (Bidyut Kumar)
Black-winged stilts have a wide distribution across W Europe and the Mediterranean all the way to central Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar, South and SE Asia. (Sarabjit Lehal)
Black-winged stilts have a wide distribution across W Europe and the Mediterranean all the way to central Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar, South and SE Asia. (Sarabjit Lehal)
European nightjars breed across Europe in the N to a latitude of 64°N and in Asia to the N up to about 60°N, as well as E all the way to Lake Baikal and E Mongolia, wintering in Africa S of the Sahara and to a limited extent in Pakistan, Morocco and Israel. (Fabio Usvardi)
European nightjars breed across Europe in the N to a latitude of 64°N and in Asia to the N up to about 60°N, as well as E all the way to Lake Baikal and E Mongolia, wintering in Africa S of the Sahara and to a limited extent in Pakistan, Morocco and Israel. (Fabio Usvardi)
Blue-throated barbets are a colorful barbet species found across the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Blue-throated barbets are a colorful barbet species found across the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Golden-fronted leafbirds are an abundant resident breeder in India, Sri Lanka, and some parts of SE Asia. (Dhritiman Hore)
Golden-fronted leafbirds are an abundant resident breeder in India, Sri Lanka, and some parts of SE Asia. (Dhritiman Hore)
Greater roadrunners prefer desert and shrubby country in SW United States and N Mexico. (Laurie Ross)
Greater roadrunners prefer desert and shrubby country in SW United States and N Mexico. (Laurie Ross)
Green-breasted mangos breed in E and S Mexico all the way S through to Central America as far as some near-shore islands and Costa Rica. (Owen Deutsch / www.owendeutsch.com)
Green-breasted mangos breed in E and S Mexico all the way S through to Central America as far as some near-shore islands and Costa Rica. (Owen Deutsch / www.owendeutsch.com)
Jungle owlets prefer scrub forest and deciduous forests on the Indian subcontinent. (Suresh AC)
Jungle owlets prefer scrub forest and deciduous forests on the Indian subcontinent. (Suresh AC)
Zitting cisticolas have a large breeding range in S Europe, Africa and S Asia all the way to N Australia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Zitting cisticolas have a large breeding range in S Europe, Africa and S Asia all the way to N Australia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Plain prinias prefer wet lowland grassland, open woodland, scrub and sometimes gardens in Pakistan and India all the way to S China and SE Asia. (Karunakanth Bathula)
Plain prinias prefer wet lowland grassland, open woodland, scrub and sometimes gardens in Pakistan and India all the way to S China and SE Asia. (Karunakanth Bathula)
Black-faced laughingthrushes are found along the E Himalayas from E Nepal to Arunachal Pradesh in India all the way across to Myanmar and Bhutan, as well as SE Tibet. (Meghna Banerjee)
Black-faced laughingthrushes are found along the E Himalayas from E Nepal to Arunachal Pradesh in India all the way across to Myanmar and Bhutan, as well as SE Tibet. (Meghna Banerjee)
Pied avocets breed in temperate Europe and W and central Asia, wintering in Africa or S Asia. (Meghna Banerjee)
Pied avocets breed in temperate Europe and W and central Asia, wintering in Africa or S Asia. (Meghna Banerjee)
Mountain bulbuls range across the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia. (Shaiful Azhar Abu Bakar)
Mountain bulbuls range across the Indian subcontinent and SE Asia. (Shaiful Azhar Abu Bakar)
Rufous-collared kingfishers prefer the subtropical and tropical moist lowland and montane forests of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, and Thailand. (Shaiful Azhar Abu Bakar)
Rufous-collared kingfishers prefer the subtropical and tropical moist lowland and montane forests of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, and Thailand. (Shaiful Azhar Abu Bakar)
Siberian rubythroats are a migratory insectivore that breed in the mixed coniferous forests of Siberia and winter in India and Indonesia. (Shantanu Bhattacharya)
Siberian rubythroats are a migratory insectivore that breed in the mixed coniferous forests of Siberia and winter in India and Indonesia. (Shantanu Bhattacharya)
Kelp gulls breeds on coastlines and islands across most of the S hemisphere. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
Kelp gulls breeds on coastlines and islands across most of the S hemisphere. (Sjoerd van Berge Henegouwen)
Firethroats breed in temperate forests in Sichuan Province (China), wintering in the Indian subcontinent across Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Tibet and Myanmar. (Surajit Sarkar)
Firethroats breed in temperate forests in Sichuan Province (China), wintering in the Indian subcontinent across Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Tibet and Myanmar. (Surajit Sarkar)
Demoiselle cranes are a strongly migratory species from W Eurasia that winter in Africa and the Indian subcontinent. (Tanmoy Das)
Demoiselle cranes are a strongly migratory species from W Eurasia that winter in Africa and the Indian subcontinent. (Tanmoy Das)
Lesser sand plovers are a migratory species, wintering on sandy beaches in E Africa, S Asia and Australasia. (Tanmoy Das)
Lesser sand plovers are a migratory species, wintering on sandy beaches in E Africa, S Asia and Australasia. (Tanmoy Das)
Blue-capped rock thrushes are summer visitors to parts of Afghanistan and along the Himalayas, migrating to pine forests and hill slopes during summer. (Tanuku Manohar)
Blue-capped rock thrushes are summer visitors to parts of Afghanistan and along the Himalayas, migrating to pine forests and hill slopes during summer. (Tanuku Manohar)
Red-tailed black cockatoos are a large black cockatoo native to Australia that   is usually found in eucalyptus woodlands and riverine forest habitat. (Trevor Andersen)
Red-tailed black cockatoos are a large black cockatoo native to Australia that is usually found in eucalyptus woodlands and riverine forest habitat. (Trevor Andersen)

The Wild Bird Trust would like to thank Swarovski Optik for helping to make the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” a possibility! Go to the new Wild BirdTrust website for a chance to WIN a pair of amazing Swarovski binoculars by donating $10!

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #71″:

http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/21/top-25-wild-bird-photographs-of-the-week-71/

Comments

  1. Bidyut Kumar De
    KOLKATA
    January 24, 2015, 3:18 am

    Great images,many thanks for selecting my image.Many thanks for other photographers for their excellent photos.
    Many thanks to Steve Boyes and National Geographic.

  2. Bidyut Kumar De
    KOLKATA
    January 24, 2015, 3:15 am

    Great images,many thanks for selecting my image.M

  3. RAJIB MAJI
    Rawatbhata, Rajasthan, 323306, INDIA
    January 20, 2015, 11:35 am

    outstanding images

  4. Heta Karia
    India
    January 17, 2015, 1:23 pm

    Excellent images amazing by Shantanu !, Siberian rubythroat

  5. Milan Roy
    Asansole ,INDIA
    September 24, 2014, 3:36 pm

    Thks for information ,just awesome

  6. Syed Mohammad Salim
    Chittagong-Bangladesh
    September 24, 2014, 1:28 pm

    Thanks a lot for Excellent Photography of Amazing Bird’s.

  7. anna lynar
    Ettalong Beach nsw Australia
    September 18, 2014, 5:20 am

    I love these bird photos they bring such joy to my day thank you so much regards Anna

  8. suresh AC
    kalady kerala india
    September 18, 2014, 4:15 am

    Thank you so much for selecting my phito in the 25.thanks to the team

  9. kulvinder kochar kaur
    jalandhar,punjab,india
    September 18, 2014, 4:06 am

    such beauty and colourful birds -it is amazing they are getting depleted -had never seen such a green bird with a name mango and beautiful other kingfishers and such lovely colours and how tyheir habitat is getting destroyed is a shame although didnt see what we call koel although saw 25 photographs of amazing birds of various habitats from sandy regions moving to various other regions.

  10. Tanuku Manohar
    Chennai
    September 18, 2014, 3:31 am

    Thanks a lot for selecting my photo for this week … Congrats to all the other members whose photo has been selected .. An honor indeed 🙂

  11. Belinda Jonker
    Pietermaritzburg
    September 18, 2014, 3:14 am

    Wonderful to capture the beauty of birds. So perfect in every little detail. Well Done and Thank you Steve

  12. Tanmoy Das
    Kolkata, India.
    September 18, 2014, 3:01 am

    Amazing bird images! Delighted to see couple of my images in this collection. Thank you Steve Boyes. Thank you National Geographic.