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Our Work Saving Africa’s Most Endangered Parrot

Please watch this 7-minute documentary on the Cape Parrot Project produced for global distribution by German television. How can we imagine a world without magnificent creatures like South Africa’s Cape parrot? Are we doing enough to protect our natural heritage? What can each of us do to turn this around? Why are we in this situation?

A recent study by WWF determined that the population sizes of over 3500 vertebrate species—mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish—have declined by over 50% just in the last 40 years. Tragically and irreversibly, wildlife populations around the world have declined by more than half in less than two generations. Our daily lives are filled with the chaos of modern life and we do not have time or energy to even think about everything in the natural world that we are just about to lose. Everyday we see stories in the news about dehorned rhinos, more dead elephants, beached whales, canned lions, disappearing species, and collapsing ecosystems.

Life is hard and there are enough problems at work, in our family life, with relatives and friends, and almost everywhere we look. Most of us would starve to death if we refused to eat food that was not a huge burden on the planet and species like these beautiful Cape parrots. People often ask me: “How do you not get depressed at the situation we are in and simply feel like giving up?” Well, all I need to believe that we can turn this around is our Cape Parrot Project group on Facebook and amazing people like Rodnick Biljon, Justin Eberhardt, David Bellamy, Susan Leas Latham, Phil McLean, Tara Tiki, Donna Shore, Greg Shaw, John Hilton and many others. These people make part of everyday available for species and conservation issues they want to help. Their work and commitment motivates me to continue in the knowledge that the work we do WILL create a better future for us all.

 

Watch: Feature report on the Cape Parrot Project “Cape Parrots face shrinking habitat”.

 

Watch: Interview with Steve Boyes about the importance of the cape parrot habitat.

 

Watch: Interview with Steve Boyes about the increasing illegal bird trade with cape parrot.

 

Join us! Join the Cape Parrot Project group and become part of an award-winning movement to save this beautiful green-and-gold parrot from extinction. Go to: https://www.facebook.com/groups/capeparrotproject/

M&G Greening the Future - Biodiversity Stewardship - Winner!
M&G Greening the Future – Biodiversity Stewardship – Winner!
One of our most popular Cape parrot photographs of 2014! Well done, Rodnick! You truly are the "Cape parrot whisperer". (Rodnick Biljon)
One of our most popular Cape parrot photographs of 2014! Well done, Rodnick! You truly are the “Cape parrot whisperer”. (Rodnick Biljon)
Adult male Cape parrot enjoying some quite time during the hottest part of the day. (Rodnick Biljon)
Adult male Cape parrot enjoying some quite time during the hottest part of the day. (Rodnick Biljon)
Flock of Cape parrots flying over King William's Town on their way to the wild plum tree they are feeding on together. Wild plums sustain this population for up to 12 months a year. (Rodnick Biljon)
Flock of Cape parrots flying over King William’s Town on their way to the wild plum tree they are feeding on together. Wild plums sustain this population for up to 12 months a year. (Rodnick Biljon)
Young Cape parrot having some fun launching off like an acrobat! I have not studied a bird that enjoys flying more! (Rodnick Biljon)
Young Cape parrot having some fun launching off like an acrobat! I have not studied a bird that enjoys flying more! (Rodnick Biljon)
At certain times of year Cape parrots fly hundreds of miles every day to and from distant feeding sites always returning to the same roost sites in the high mountains. (Rodnick Biljon)
At certain times of year Cape parrots fly hundreds of miles every day to and from distant feeding sites always returning to the same roost sites in the high mountains. (Rodnick Biljon)
Young Cape parrot fledgling waiting for mom or ad to come back to the "nursery tree" with food... (Rodnick Biljon)
Young Cape parrot fledgling waiting for mom or ad to come back to the “nursery tree” with food… (Rodnick Biljon)
Young Cape parrot trying to eat a wild plum before mom or dad return with the food they managed to find... (Rodnick Biljon)
Young Cape parrot trying to eat a wild plum before mom or dad return with the food they managed to find… (Rodnick Biljon)
Two perfect, young Cape parrot fledglings basking in the early morning sun. (Rodnick Biljon)
Two perfect, young Cape parrot fledglings basking in the early morning sun. (Rodnick Biljon)
Cape parrot mom feeding her enthusiastic youngsters. Just wonderful to see. Images like this make me cry. (Rodnick Biljon)
Cape parrot mom feeding her enthusiastic youngsters. Just wonderful to see. Images like this make me cry. (Rodnick Biljon)
Dad comes back to two excited Cape parrot fledglings. This is the future of the species...! (Rodnick Biljon)
Dad comes back to two excited Cape parrot fledglings. This is the future of the species…! (Rodnick Biljon)
"Love is in the air" as a Cape parrot breeding pair celebrate a successful breeding season. (Rodnick Biljon)
“Love is in the air” as a Cape parrot breeding pair celebrate a successful breeding season. (Rodnick Biljon)
Adult male Cape parrot in a coral tree in King William's Town. (Rodnick Biljon)
Adult male Cape parrot in a coral tree in King William’s Town. (Rodnick Biljon)
Grey-headed parrot, a very close cousin of the Cape parrot, in poor condition in a makeshift roadside cage after being poached from the nest. We have no idea how many of these magnificent parrots are left in the wild. (Kobus Lombard‎)
Grey-headed parrot, a very close cousin of the Cape parrot, in poor condition in a makeshift roadside cage after being poached from the nest. We have no idea how many of these magnificent parrots are left in the wild. (Kobus Lombard‎)

Comments

  1. Elwin Stracahan
    South Africa , Bloemfontein
    December 26, 2014, 5:39 am

    Great to see there is help on these beautiful birds