Menu

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #75

WBT logo

Wow! We are almost there! Nearly 860,000 Wild Bird Enthusiasts on our Facebook page and counting… This is the 75th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” and represents one of the best wild bird photograph collections I have ever seen. This is a testament to how far this community has come and how much effort all of the contributing photographers and enthusiasts have to put in. We need your help to achieve our world-changing target of 1 million Wild Bird Enthusiasts celebrating the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild. These beautiful images unite us as one blue-green living planet. Share your favourite wild bird photographs, invite your friends to join, grab some binoculars and your camera, and support global bird conservation by donating to the Wild Bird Trust.   

Again, this week’s edition we included South Africa’s Cape parrot, the most endangered parrots in Africa and one of the most beautiful birds on the continent. Please join us in celebrating this stunning bird by voting them in as South Africa’s favourite bird. Click on the banner below…

Birdlife vote

Please help us continue our work by donating to the Wild Bird Trust: http://www.wildbirdtrust.com/donations/ Go to the new Wild Bird Trust website to learn more about our research and conservation projects in Africa. Your wild bird photographs can now be submitted at: www.wildbirdtrust.com/top25 Include #greatnature #wildbird when posting new photos!

Streaked laughingthrushes range across the northern part sof the Indian subcontinent in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia and Tajikistan. (Virag Sharma)
Streaked laughingthrushes range across the northern part sof the Indian subcontinent in Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia and Tajikistan. (Virag Sharma)
Steppe eagles breed in  Romania all the way E through S Russia and the central Asian steppes and Mongolia, wintering in India and Africa. Photographed here in India. (Pratik Humnabadkar)
Steppe eagles breed in Romania all the way E through S Russia and the central Asian steppes and Mongolia, wintering in India and Africa. Photographed here in India. (Pratik Humnabadkar)
Spot-billed ducks or "spotbills" are resident breeders in the S part of its range from Pakistan and India all the way to S Japan with the N subspecies wintering in SE Asia. Photographed here in Rajkot, Gujarat (India). (Satyam Dave)
Spot-billed ducks or “spotbills” are resident breeders in the S part of its range from Pakistan and India all the way to S Japan with the N subspecies wintering in SE Asia. Photographed here in Rajkot, Gujarat (India). (Satyam Dave)
Snowy owls nest in the Arctic tundra of the northernmost stretches of Alaska, Canada and Eurasia, wintering S through Canada and N Eurasia with irruptions occurring further south in some years due to extreme cold. Photographed here at Lake Michigan (USA). (Peter Chromik)
Snowy owls nest in the Arctic tundra of the northernmost stretches of Alaska, Canada and Eurasia, wintering S through Canada and N Eurasia with irruptions occurring further south in some years due to extreme cold. Photographed here at Lake Michigan (USA). (Peter Chromik)
Siberian stonechats are distributed throughout most of temperate Asia from about latitude 71°N in Siberia S to the Himalaya and SW China, as well as W to E Turkey, the Caspian Sea, and the far NE of Europe (mainly in Russia). (Mainak Das)
Siberian stonechats are distributed throughout most of temperate Asia from about latitude 71°N in Siberia S to the Himalaya and SW China, as well as W to E Turkey, the Caspian Sea, and the far NE of Europe (mainly in Russia). (Mainak Das)
Robin accentors are found in Bhutan, China, India, Nepal, and Pakistan. (Subhajit Chaudhuri)
Robin accentors are found in Bhutan, China, India, Nepal, and Pakistan. (Subhajit Chaudhuri)
Lesser-striped swallows breed across much of sub-Saharan Africa from Sierra Leone and southern Sudan south into eastern South Africa. Photographed here in South Africa. (John Vosloo)
Lesser-striped swallows breed across much of sub-Saharan Africa from Sierra Leone and southern Sudan south into eastern South Africa. Photographed here in South Africa. (John Vosloo)
Marvellous spatuletails are endemic to Peru asnd considered Endangered due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size, and limited range. (Dubi Shapiro / ABCbirds.org)
Marvellous spatuletails are endemic to Peru asnd considered Endangered due to ongoing habitat loss, small population size, and limited range. (Dubi Shapiro / ABCbirds.org)
Long-legged buzzards are distributed dry open plains of northern Africa, southeastern Europe, west and central Asia east to China, and across central India. (Faiz Rehman)
Long-legged buzzards are distributed dry open plains of northern Africa, southeastern Europe, west and central Asia east to China, and across central India. (Faiz Rehman)
Painted spurfowls are found in the rocky hills and scrub forests of peninsular India. (Subrato Sanyal)
Painted spurfowls are found in the rocky hills and scrub forests of peninsular India. (Subrato Sanyal)
Cape parrots are endemic to South Africa where they are restricted to a long archipeligo of isolated Afromontane forest patches degraded by logging. (Rodnick Biljon)
Cape parrots are endemic to South Africa where they are restricted to a long archipeligo of isolated Afromontane forest patches degraded by logging. (Rodnick Biljon)
Purple swamphen prefer marshes and wetlands in S Europe, Africa, S Asia and Australasia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Purple swamphen prefer marshes and wetlands in S Europe, Africa, S Asia and Australasia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Great white pelicans breed in swamps and shallow lakes from SE Europe through to Asia and Africa. Photographed here in Rajkot, Gujarat (India). (Satyam Dave)
Great white pelicans breed in swamps and shallow lakes from SE Europe through to Asia and Africa. Photographed here in Rajkot, Gujarat (India). (Satyam Dave)
Common Iora are found in scrub and low forest across the tropical Indian subcontinent. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Common Iora are found in scrub and low forest across the tropical Indian subcontinent. (Firoz Al Sabah)
European bee-eaters breed in S Europe and parts of N Africa and W Asia, migrating S to winter in tropical Africa, India and Sri Lanka. (Rich Lindie / www.rockjumper.co.za)
European bee-eaters breed in S Europe and parts of N Africa and W Asia, migrating S to winter in tropical Africa, India and Sri Lanka. (Rich Lindie / www.rockjumper.co.za)
Crimson-collared tanagers prefer the edges of humid evergreen forests and second growth of S Veracruz and N Oaxaca in Mexico all the way across to the highlands of W Panama. Photographed here in Costa Rica. (Tyohar Wildlife Photography)
Crimson-collared tanagers prefer the edges of humid evergreen forests and second growth of S Veracruz and N Oaxaca in Mexico all the way across to the highlands of W Panama. Photographed here in Costa Rica. (Tyohar Wildlife Photography)
Collared pratincoles are found in the warmer parts of Europe, SW Asia and Africa, migrating to tropical Africa during winter. (Phinda Daryl Dell)
Collared pratincoles are found in the warmer parts of Europe, SW Asia and Africa, migrating to tropical Africa during winter. (Phinda Daryl Dell)
Bronze-winged jacanas breed in India and southeast Asia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Bronze-winged jacanas breed in India and southeast Asia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
White-spotted fantails are found in forest, scrub and cultivated lands in S and central India. Photographed here in Bangalore (India). (Sathish Poojari)
White-spotted fantails are found in forest, scrub and cultivated lands in S and central India. Photographed here in Bangalore (India). (Sathish Poojari)
White-throated kingfishers widely distributed in Eurasia from Bulgaria,[3] Turkey, West Asia east through the Indian subcontinent to the Philippines. (Rich Lindie / www.rockjumper.co.za)
White-throated kingfishers widely distributed in Eurasia from Bulgaria,[3] Turkey, West Asia east through the Indian subcontinent to the Philippines. (Rich Lindie / www.rockjumper.co.za)
Willow tits are widespread and common resident breeders throughout temperate and subarctic Europe and N Asia. Photographed here in Finland. (Arsi Ikonen)
Willow tits are widespread and common resident breeders throughout temperate and subarctic Europe and N Asia. Photographed here in Finland. (Arsi Ikonen)
Barn swallows breed across most of the N Hemisphere, migrating to much of the S Hemisphere as far south as central Argentina, South Africa and N Australia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Barn swallows breed across most of the N Hemisphere, migrating to much of the S Hemisphere as far south as central Argentina, South Africa and N Australia. (Kallol Mukherjee)
Black-hooded parakeet or "Nanday parakeet" are indigenous to South America from SE Bolivia to SW Brazil, central Paraguay and N Argentina. Photographed here in the Pantanal. (Owen Deutsch)
Black-hooded parakeet or “Nanday parakeet” are indigenous to South America from SE Bolivia to SW Brazil, central Paraguay and N Argentina. Photographed here in the Pantanal. (Owen Deutsch)
Blue-capped rock thrushes breed in the foothills of the Himalayas and winters in the hill forests of southern India. (Rahul Deshpande)
Blue-capped rock thrushes breed in the foothills of the Himalayas and winters in the hill forests of southern India. (Rahul Deshpande)
White-eyed buzzards are widely distributed in S Asia throughout India in the open plains, extending all the way up to 1000m in the Himalaya foothills, and are resident in Iran, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Myanmar. (Tanuku Manohar)
White-eyed buzzards are widely distributed in S Asia throughout India in the open plains, extending all the way up to 1000m in the Himalaya foothills, and are resident in Iran, Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Myanmar. (Tanuku Manohar)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. Our blue-green living planet has seen cataclysms like us before and has always come back after the threat has subsided. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Bird Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Bird Revolution!!

The Wild Bird Trust would like to thank Swarovski Optik for helping to make the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” a possibility! Go to the new Wild BirdTrust website for a chance to WIN a pair of amazing Swarovski binoculars by donating $10!

See last week “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #74″:

http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2014/12/24/top-25-wild-bird-photographs-of-the-week-74/

Comments

  1. Kapil Pant
    New Delhi
    May 6, 2015, 1:23 am

    Kindly inform how can i post photographs which re published weekly on your site ?

  2. sumanta basu
    Hooghly, India
    April 1, 2015, 5:22 am

    lovely photographs. nice initiative. when would the 76th week’s images come?

  3. KAPIL
    Noida India
    February 19, 2015, 5:32 am

    Sirs,

    Please mail me the procedure to submit photographs ?

    Rgds

    Kapil pant

  4. Faiz Rehman
    Dhubri, Assam, India
    February 2, 2015, 12:16 pm

    Thanks a lot for selecting my photograph and Congrats to all the other birders 🙂

  5. sally gould
    Portland, Oregon USA
    January 29, 2015, 4:01 pm

    Beautiful ! Let us all take care of our planet so these birds can remain in their habitat. Please save the plants they depend on for food and breeding. Only you and I can make a difference. They are life in the skies! Please do not let them disappear!!!

  6. Gulab
    Afghanistan
    January 28, 2015, 11:00 pm

    What is name of bird

  7. Zsuzsánna Szopkó
    Hungary
    January 28, 2015, 1:32 pm

    Where is the name latin of this birds? You give a lot of hours fot foto, but cannot 5 minute for the latin name, to reading, at learning for me? Why?

  8. shubha Urs
    India
    January 28, 2015, 11:55 am

    Its a pleasure to see such beautiful photographs of wild birds, when you love birds in the deep forests flying free.

  9. Tig Warne
    Magoebaskloof, Limpopo
    January 28, 2015, 9:43 am

    We are privileged to have a small group of Cape parrots in our area. they come to feed on Pecan nuts on our farm, which is on the south side of the Woodbush Reserve. They are such joyful birds “talking” to each other as they fly overhead and when they are sitting in our trees. We also have a population of Samango monkeys and a few Vervets. Needless to say we never have any Pecans ourselves!