VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Africa’s Imperiled Wild Lions Don’t Need Petting and Walking Operations – Os Ameaçados Leões Selvagens de África Não Precisam de Festinhas e Passeios

Attempts by “walking with lions” or “cub-petting” operators to establish new commercial ventures in Mozambique and Zambia under the guise of “lion conservation” should raise serious concern among our environmental and governmental leaders.

Authors: Paola Bouley & Dr. Rui Branco – Projecto Leões da Gorongosa, Mozambique. www.Lions.Gorongosa.org;  Dr. Colleen Begg – Niassa Carnivore Project, Mozambique. www.Niassalion.orgDr. Matthew S. Becker, Zambian Carnivore Programme, Zambia.  www.ZambiaCarnivores.org

The Niassa Lion Project in Northern Mozambique strives to nurture co-existence between lions and communities in of Africa's last-remaining lion strongholds.
The Niassa Lion Project in Northern Mozambique strives to nurture co-existence between lions and communities in of Africa’s last-remaining lion strongholds.  Photo:  C.M. Begg.

Commercial “lion encounter” ventures have undeniably exploded in popularity in Zimbabwe, South Africa and Zambia recently with well-intentioned tourists being drawn into these facilities and into believing their visits support conservation of lions in the wild. Unfortunately, quite the opposite is true, and at a time when wild lion populations need all the help they can garner these operations are actually doing our national parks and reserves a great disservice. They divert much-needed tourism away from established protected areas and attention away from what is really needed to secure survival of the species across the continent – that is, recognizing the root causes for the rapid decline of wild populations underway and putting the full weight of our efforts towards meaningfully strengthening protections for the species through long-term, complex and integrated conservation solutions.

A Call to Action

While the many problems associated with “walking with lion” industry have now been addressed by experts repeatedly (e.g. Hunter et al. 2012, Hunter 2012), potential operators continue to surface. Just recently venture operators have been making the rounds in Mozambique and attempting to establish facilities and offload their surplus lions (lion cubs quickly outgrow captive facilities) into protected areas like Niassa Reserve and Gorongosa National Park, and secure endorsements for their ventures from government and conservation organizations. Thankfully, managers of these protected areas are very well-informed and the proposals have been quickly declined. Nonetheless, this has greatly highlighted the urgent need to raise public and governmental awareness and put the brakes on an industry that will do conservation of Mozambique and Zambia’s wild lion populations and habitat a great disservice.

These facilities will predictably argue that the lions they captive-breed can be reintroduced in to areas where lions populations are threatened or have been extirpated. But in truth, to save our wild lion populations we don’t need shadowy captive breeding or re-introduction programs of this sort. Reintroducing lions – or any wildlife – into a protected area that has lost such a population is always a last resort or “emergency measure,” but without addressing the factors that caused that decline in the first place is a death sentence for the reintroduced animals involved and simply a waste of already scarce and precious conservation funds. A good example being snaring and the illegal bushmeat trade, the “silent killer” of lions and other carnivores across both Southern Africa which is very seriously threatening lion populations. No amount of reintroductions will ever bring back a population under the conditions that lead to their decline in the first place. On a positive note, if the root causes are mitigated or even partly solved wild populations – being remarkably resilient as they are – can and will bounce back. We only need to put the full weight of our attention and resources towards saving existing wild populations and their habitats. Lion populations are plummeting for a reason, and we all need to urgently address the roots causes of the declines.

Projecto Leoes da Gorongosa is dedicated to post-war recovery of a wild lion population and works daily to stem the impact of human encroachment and bushmeat poaching on lions in Mozambique's flagship national park.
Projecto Leoes da Gorongosa is dedicated to post-war recovery of a wild lion population and works daily to stem the impact of human encroachment and bushmeat poaching on lions in Mozambique’s flagship national park.  Photo: P. Bouley.

From an animal welfare perspective these operations also pose a lot of challenges. The “walk with lion” industry exists in a black hole of unregulated trade with complete lack of animal-welfare oversight making them extremely vulnerable to abuse, all counter to what any tourist or conservationist would knowingly support. Operators consistently attempt to mislead tourists about the value of their commercial operations and incorrectly promote the idea that lion conservation issues are effectively solved by captive breeding lions and reintroducing them. While most operations use the reintroduction idea as a justification for their business with little intention of actually doing so, these operations end up with a surplus of lions too old to cuddle or walk and in need of more space to live out the rest of their lives. In some cases these lions are diverted to canned-lion hunts, an appalling inhumane practice where lions are “disappeared” into a nebulous, unregulated sport-hunting trade that not coincidentally is fueling a dangerous trade in lion bones (Williams et al 2015).

Captive-bred lions are killed in canned hunts and supply a growing Asian demand for lion bones.
Captive-bred lions are killed in canned hunts and supply a growing Asian demand for lion bones.

Last but not least, captive bred animals are a gamble for everyone involved, but none more than the communities near which they are released. A lion accustomed to human contact is a serious risk for all parties involved, especially so in Mozambique where communities live within or in very close proximity to protected areas and parks. Recent attacks on tourists in very well established “lion encounter” parks in South Africa only highlight the risks.

Conservation programs across the region working hard to protect wild lions and their habitats through reducing specific threats like bushmeat snaring and livestock conflict, and through collaborating with communities to solve environmental problems, are showing some success. However investment in these programs and in protection of Africa’s last remaining wild lion populations is very inadequate. These are the programs that need to be strengthened now, and on which we need to focus limited resources, not spurious commercial “walking with lions and cub petting ventures. Any commercial operations focused on lions would be best served through growing the wildlife and eco-tourism industry in Africa’s protected area networks that support wild lion populations and their habitat and investing in communities that have to co-exist with wildlife.

The Zambian Carnivore Programme is dedicated to protecting large carnivores in one of the last-remaining strongholds for lions on the African continent.
The Zambian Carnivore Programme is dedicated to protecting large carnivores in one of the last-remaining strongholds for lions on the African continent.  Photo:  T. Mweetwa.

References
Hunter, L., 2012. Captive Lion Reintroduction, a ‘Conservation Myth. The Huffington Post

Hunter, L., White, P., Henschel, P., Frank, L., et al., 2012. Walking with lions: why there is no role for captive-origin lions Panthera leo in species restoration. Oryx1–6.

Vivienne Williams, David Newton, Andrew Loveridge and David Macdonald. BONES OF CONTENTION: An assessment of the South African trade in African Lion Panthera leo bones and other body parts. A TRAFFIC and WildCRU Joint Report. 2015.

 


Os Ameaçados Leões Selvagens de África Não Precisam de Festinhas e Passeios

Autores: Paola Bouley & Dr. Rui Branco – Projecto Leões da Gorongosa, Mozambique. www.Lions.Gorongosa.org;  Dr. Colleen Begg – Niassa Carnivore Project, Mozambique. www.Niassalion.org; Dr. Matthew S. Becker, Zambian Carnivore Programme, Zambia. www.ZambiaCarnivores.org

The Niassa Lion Project in Northern Mozambique strives to nurture co-existence between lions and communities in of Africa's last-remaining lion strongholds.
The Niassa Lion Project in Northern Mozambique strives to nurture co-existence between lions and communities in of Africa’s last-remaining lion strongholds.

Tentativas recentes de operadores de “passeios com leões” ou de “fazer festinhas a leõezinhos” para estabelecer novos empreendimentos comerciais em Moçambique e na Zâmbia sob o disfarce de “conservação dos leões” deve levantar sérias preocupações entre os nossos líderes ambientais e governamentais.

Iniciativas comerciais de “encontro com leões” têm inegavelmente obtido grande popularidade no Zimbabwe, África do Sul e recentemente na Zâmbia junto de turistas bem-intencionados que foram atraídos para essas instalações acreditando que com as suas visitas estavam a apoiar a conservação dos leões em estado selvagem. Infelizmente, o oposto é verdadeiro, e numa altura em que as populações de leões selvagens precisam de toda a ajuda que se consiga obter, essas operações estão realmente a fazer aos nossos parques nacionais e reservas um enorme mau serviço. Elas desviam o muito necessário turismo para longe das áreas protegidas existentes e desviam a atenção do que é realmente necessário para garantir a sobrevivência da espécie em todo o continente – isto é, reconhecer as causas para o rápido declínio em curso das populações selvagens e colocar todo o peso dos nossos esforços no sentido de fortalecer significativamente as protecções para as espécies através de complexas soluções integradas de conservação a longo prazo.

Um Apelo à Acção

Enquanto os muitos problemas associados com a indústria do “passeio com os leões” têm sido abordados repetidamente por especialistas (por exemplo, Hunter et al. 2012, Hunter 2012), os potenciais operadores continuam a aparecer. Recentemente operadores destas actividades têm vindo a fazer rondas em Moçambique e a tentar estabelecer as suas instalações e descarregar os seus leões excedentários (os filhotes de leão superam rapidamente a capacidade das instalações de cativeiro) em áreas protegidas como a Reserva do Niassa e o Parque Nacional da Gorongosa, e a tentar obter certificações para seus empreendimentos do governo e das organizações de conservação. Felizmente, os administradores dessas áreas protegidas estão muito bem informados e as propostas têm sido rapidamente rejeitadas. No entanto, isso deu maior realce à necessidade urgente de aumentar a consciência pública e governamental e colocar travões numa indústria que vai fazer ao habitat e à conservação das populações de leões selvagens de Moçambique e da Zâmbia um enorme mau serviço.

Estes empreendimentos irão previsivelmente argumentar que os leões criados em cativeiro podem ser reintroduzidos em áreas onde as populações de leões estão ameaçadas ou foram extirpados. Mas, na verdade, para salvar as nossas populações de leões selvagens não precisamos desse tipo de programas nebulosos de reprodução em cativeiro ou de reintrodução. Reintroduzir leões – ou qualquer outra fauna bravia – numa área protegida que perdeu essa população é sempre um último recurso ou “medida de emergência”, mas sem abordar em primeiro lugar os factores que causaram esse declínio, é uma sentença de morte para os animais reintroduzidos e simplesmente um desperdício dos já escassos e preciosos fundos de conservação. Bons exemplos são a caça furtiva e o comércio ilegal da carne de caça, o “assassino silencioso” de leões e outros carnívoros em toda a África Austral que está a ameaçar seriamente as populações de leões. Nenhuma quantidade de reintroduções irá trazer de volta uma população às condições que levaram à sua queda, em primeiro lugar. Numa nota positiva, se as causas originais forem mitigados ou mesmo parcialmente resolvidas, as populações selvagens – sendo notavelmente resistentes como são – podem e irão recuperar. Nós só precisamos de colocar todo o peso da nossa atenção e recursos para salvar as populações selvagens existentes e os seus habitats. As populações de leões estão em queda acentuada por alguma razão, e todos nós precisamos de abordar urgentemente as causas fundamentais desse declínio.

Projecto Leoes da Gorongosa is dedicated to post-war recovery of a wild lion population and works daily to stem the impact of human encroachment and bushmeat poaching on lions in Mozambique's flagship national park.
Projecto Leoes da Gorongosa is dedicated to post-war recovery of a wild lion population and works daily to stem the impact of human encroachment and bushmeat poaching on lions in Mozambique’s flagship national park.

De uma perspectiva do bem-estar animal estas operações também apresentam uma série de desafios. A indústria dos “passeios com leões” existe num buraco negro de comércio irregular com total falta de supervisão sobre o bem-estar dos animais tornando-os extremamente vulneráveis a abusos, tudo ao contrário do que qualquer turista ou conservacionista apoiaria com conhecimento de causa. Operadores consistentemente tentam enganar os turistas sobre o valor das suas operações comerciais e promovem de forma incorrecta a ideia de que as questões de conservação dos leões são efectivamente resolvidas através da reprodução de leões em cativeiro e seguida de reintroduções. Enquanto a maioria das operações usam a ideia da reintrodução como a justificação para os seus negócios, ainda que com pouca intenção de realmente a fazer, essas operações acabam por gerar um excedente de leões velhos demais para “fazer festinhas” ou para passear e que precisam de mais espaço para viver o resto das suas vidas . Em alguns casos, esses leões são desviadas para caçadas a “leões-enlatados”, uma prática desumana terrível onde os leões acabam por desaparecer num comércio nebuloso de caça desportiva não regulamentada que não por acaso está a alimentar um comércio perigoso de ossos de leões (Williams et al 2015).

Captive-bred lions are killed in canned hunts and supply a growing Asian demand for lion bones.
Captive-bred lions are killed in canned hunts and supply a growing Asian demand for lion bones.

Por último, mas não menos importante, os animais criados em cativeiro são uma incerteza para todos os envolvidos, mas sobretudo para as comunidades perto da quais eles são libertados. Os leões acostumados ao contacto humano são um grave risco para todas as partes envolvidas, especialmente em Moçambique, onde as comunidades vivem dentro ou muito próximo das áreas protegidas e dos parques. Recentes ataques contra turistas em parques reconhecidos como “de encontro com leões” na África do Sul só vieram realçar esses riscos.

Programas de conservação em toda a região que trabalham arduamente para proteger os leões selvagens e os seus habitats através da redução das ameaças específicas, como a caça furtiva de animais selvagens e o conflito com animais domésticos, através de colaboração com as comunidades para resolver os problemas ambientais, estão a mostrar algum sucesso. No entanto o investimento nesses programas e na protecção das últimas populações remanescente de leões selvagens em África é muito insuficiente. Estes são os programas que precisam ser reforçados agora, e sobre o qual temos de concentrar os recursos limitados, e não em iniciativas comerciais espúrias de “passeios com leões e de festinhas a leõezinhos”. Quaisquer operações comerciais focadas em leões seriam melhor aproveitadas através do crescimento da indústria de fauna bravia e ecoturismo nas redes de áreas protegidas de África que apoiam as populações de leões selvagens e os seus habitats e através do investimento nas comunidades que têm que coexistir com a fauna bravia.

The Zambian Carnivore Programme is dedicated to protecting large carnivores in one of the last-remaining strongholds for lions on the African continent.
The Zambian Carnivore Programme is dedicated to protecting large carnivores in one of the last-remaining strongholds for lions on the African continent.

Referências
Hunter, L., 2012. Captive Lion Reintroduction, a ‘Conservation Myth. The Huffington Post

Hunter, L., White, P., Henschel, P., Frank, L., et al., 2012. Walking with lions: why there is no role for captive-origin lions Panthera leo in species restoration. Oryx1–6.

Vivienne Williams, David Newton, Andrew Loveridge and David Macdonald. BONES OF CONTENTION: An assessment of the South African trade in African Lion Panthera leo bones and other body parts. A TRAFFIC and WildCRU Joint Report. 2015.

Comments

  1. Ricardo cattani
    Brasil
    November 14, 2015, 6:51 pm

    We must get Dow the president of South África, and change the law for STOP this barbaric for EVER!!!

  2. Celeste Watt
    United States
    November 11, 2015, 12:10 am

    Lions are a sentinal species. Because of them entire ecosystems flourish. If they are not there, other species will collapse.

  3. Sna
    Dresden
    November 8, 2015, 11:53 am

    Stop torturing Nature!
    Is not ours !!!