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Chat With Legendary Wildlife Photographers

giving-tuesday

Join Dereck and Beverly Joubert for a live Facebook chatDecember 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST.

(Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)
With Dereck shooting video and Beverly on stills, the Jouberts have captured unforgettably eye-opening scenes of the lives of big cats for more than a quarter century. (Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)

Big cats used to be everywhere.

So did dinosaurs.

We may never get to see dinosaurs as living, breathing creatures, but we can still see, hear, smell, and feel the incredible power and beauty of the cats. That’s something to be thankful for.

Something else to be thankful for is the existence of people like Dereck and Beverly Joubert, who have dedicated their lives to recording and protecting Africa’s rapidly shrinking big cat populations. Their films and photographs have inspired millions, and the Big Cats Initiative they helped found has supported dozens of conservation projects on the ground throughout Africa and Asia. In the video below, you can see the impact those projects are having.

Join Dereck and Beverly for a live chat on the Nat Geo Facebook page Tuesday, December 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST. Ask them about their lives in the wild, the lions and leopards they have come to know so well, or the work of the other researchers and conservationists supported by the Big Cats Initiative.

Then, show your appreciation of wildlife and the work of conservationists and filmmakers around the world by including the Big Cats Initiative and the whole National Geographic Society in your #GivingTuesday giving-back.

We share the Earth with amazing creatures. Let’s keep it that way.

(Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)
A young adult male lion, healthy, strong, and ready to make his mark in his world. (Photo by Beverly Joubert/National Geographic Creative)

Join Dereck and Beverly Joubert for a live Facebook chatDecember 1, from 12-1 p.m. EST.

Support the Big Cats Initiative and the whole National Geographic Society.

[Updated 12/1/2015]

Comments

  1. Linda Caldwell
    San Luis Obispo CA
    December 2, 2015, 4:00 am

    I just tried to leave you a very long and thoughtful comment which it looks like maybe isn’t allowed? I’ll try again.

    I hope you’re getting this comment.

    I just donated some money for a Boma and finished watching the Last Lions. All I can say is…WOW! BRAVO! I’ve been watching Big Cat Week since last Friday night. The story was told, filmed and narrated so beautifully.

    I suggested to a couple of friends that they might want to watch it as they know how much I love cats and so do they. They’ve called….and said I’ve created monsters as they’re finding it difficult to pull themselves away from the TV.

    Last Lions: The photography and film making literally moves the heart and soul. It is so riveting and beautiful, so breath taking, and absolutely heartbreaking. The angles, when the mother lioness has to leave behind her cub with the broken back. The ending was so emotional when the huntress prevailed, I welled up with happiness. Was clad to see the cub made it that far (through another day) and she had created a coalition with the other females.

    My friend and I spent a month in Africa on a photography safari this past March, starting out in Botswana. We shared a flight with the two of you out of Maun to Joburg. Beverly, you sat next to my friend and Derek, you helped me with my bag from the overhead when we landed. It wasn’t until a week later that we realized who you two were/are, although we knew you were held in high esteem by the way people interacted with you two at the Maun airport. We were settling into a new game reserve when we discovered your article in the September 2014 Peolwane Magazine, Filming the Iconic. Wow! The time time it took to read that article was a defining and a life altering. That article started educating me about the idea of supporting the Big Cats.

    I’d been home for a few months when the news of Cecil the Lion being killed broke in the US.
    Thousands upon thousands upon thousands of people here were so saddened and furious! I’ve been blogging ever sense spreading your/the knowledge of your life’s work portrayed in your films.
    Change.org is what caused all of Delta and United and American Airlines (with their connecting flights to Africa) to ban the transport of (deceased) big game animals. Period!

    Although I’ve always been a wildlife supporter, it was Cecil’s death that made me an African wildlife defender. I asked a question a few months ago on your facebook page and asked about doing the math to figure out if game hunters truly are the savior’s they think they are of Africa’s wildlife with their big game hunting money? Many of them state if it wasn’t for them there wouldn’t be wildlife conservation in Africa. Based on what my trip to Africa cost me and I’m just one person…it got me thinking. You replied to the question with a very polite 10 point answer to me (on your facebook page), to the world and to a game reserve owner (who’s his name escapes me, Ian, Ivan Evan???). It seemed like he’d challenged you on this issue before. I loved how you broke down hunting safaris vs. photography safaris, the people they employ year round instead of five months and the whole concept of making photography safaris part of the solution instead to killing all the animals that no one else will go on to enjoy. And a very good point about free marketing with all of us going home and showing our photos!

    But back to the point. For decades trophy hunters have been able to get away with the shadowy practice of killing (way more than they’re reporting) the big game in the far away place called Africa. However the internet has changed that, the world’s eyes are now on this issue and in particular the Big Cats of Africa and around the world.

    Please keep working on showing the $$$ from tourism, eco-tourism and photography safaris to aid in the fight and show how the concept can be moved forward. Thank you for Causing an Uproar and for all that you’re doing with your films and dedicating your lives to the clowder of big cats. And thank you to the crew that supports the making of your films in on every level and to National Geographic for the knowledge that is being passed around the world

  2. Elle Caldwell
    San Luis Obispo CA
    December 2, 2015, 3:29 am

    Derek and Beverly. I so hope you get this message.

    I just donated some money for a Boma and finished watching the Last Lions. All I can say is…WOW! BRAVO! My hands laid upon my heart.The story was told, filmed and narrated so beautifully.

    I’ve been watching Big Cat Week since it started last Friday night. I suggested to a couple of friends that they might want to watch it as they know how much I love cats and so do they. They’ve called….and said, I’ve created monsters as they’re finding it difficult to pull themselves away from the TV.

    Last Lions: The photography and film making literally moves the heart and soul. It is so riveting and beautiful, so breath taking, and absolutely heartbreaking. The angles of the photography when the mother lioness has to leave behind her cub with the broken back. The ending was so emotional when the huntress prevailed, I welled up with happiness that her last cub made it that far (through another day) and she had created a coalition with the other females. What a harsh life they lead.

    My friend and I spent a month in Africa on a photography safari this past March starting out in Botswana. We shared a flight with the two of you out of Maun to Joburg. Beverly, you sat next to my friend and Derek, you helped me with my bag from the overhead when we landed. It wasn’t until a week later we realized who the two of you were/are (although we knew you were held in high esteem by the way people quietly interacted with you at the Maun airport). We were settling into a new game reserve when we discovered your article in the September 2014 Peolwane Magazine, FILMING THE ICONIC. Once again, wow! Reading time it took to read that article was defining and life altering. That article started educating me about the plight, and idea of supporting the Big Cats. Thank you.

    I’d been home for a few months when the news of Cecil the Lion being killed broke in the US.
    Thousands upon thousands upon thousands were sooooooooo saddened and furious! I’ve been blogging ever sense spreading your/the knowledge of Big Cats and your life’s work portrayed in your films.

    The signatures on change.org is what caused all of Delta, and United and American Airlines with their connecting flights to Africa (joining many other countries airlines who were doing the same) to ban the transport of big game animals. Period! The world is watching now.

    Although I’ve always been a wildlife supporter, it was Cecil’s death (and the seed planted by your article in Peolwane) that made me an African wildlife defender and activist.

    I contacted you a few months ago on your facebook page and asked about doing the math to decide if game hunters truly are the savior’s they think they are of Africa wildlife with their big game hunting money? Many of them state if it wasn’t for them there wouldn’t be wildlife conservation in Africa. Based on what my trip to Africa cost me (and I’m just one person)…it got me thinking. Could that be true?
    You replied to my question with a very polite 10 point answer (on your facebook page) to me, to the world and to a game reserve owner (who’s his name escapes me, Ian, Ivan Evan???). It seemed like he’d challenged you on this issue before. I loved (and am spreading the word) how you broke down hunting safaris vs. photography safaris, the people who are employed year round instead of five months and the whole concept of making photography safaris part of the solution instead to killing all the animals that no one else will go on to enjoy. And a very good point about free marketing with all of us going home and showing our photos!

    But back to the point. For decades trophy hunters have been able to get away with the shadowy practice of killing (way more than they’re reporting) the big game in the far away place of Africa. However the internet has changed that, the world’s eyes are now on this issue and in particular the Big Cats of Africa and around the world.

    Please keep working on showing the $$$ from tourism, eco-tourism and photography safaris to aid in the fight and show how the world can move that concept forward.

    Beverly and Derek. Thank you for Causing an Uproar and for all that you’re doing with your incredible films and dedicating your lives to the clowder of big cats. And thank you to the crew that supports the making of your films in on every level and to National Geographic for the knowledge that is being passed around the world.

    And thank you France for banning hunting trophies! Well done!

  3. Clio Espinoza
    Chile
    December 1, 2015, 12:06 pm

    Hello, how are you? I would like to know what is your more valuable lesson taking photos to this beautiful cats, and how do you start to becoming a pro wildlife photographer? Thank you so much and my best wishes,
    Clio.

  4. Rachita Nishad
    Allahabad, India
    December 1, 2015, 1:35 am

    Photography seems to be a very interesting and rewarding career, isn’t it!!!!
    I am very much passionate about photography….
    I want to know how can I get into this field

  5. Annie
    Massachusetts
    November 30, 2015, 1:37 pm

    Hi, I am a relatively new Mom of two beautiful babies. I recently had my own little lioness Scarlett, who was born a (Leo) August 17th. I have always been in awe and respect for Mother lions and the way the female lions stick/work together. I think woman could learn a lot from these lionesses. I also feel like a bit of a lioness myself when it comes to my babies and just wondered if either of you have had any outstanding experiences filming a mother lioness or other female lioness? Also, thank you for sharing and protecting big cats through your amazing photography!!