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Life Aboard With Pristine Seas

If it’s a very busy, happy expedition boat strewn with scuba diving gear, work-boats jammed full of divers, strange-looking rigs attached to floats with weights and cameras, all available inside space occupied by scientists and film-makers analysing data, film, and images, microscopes always in use, cameras, computers, and batteries charging everywhere, a constant background symphony of scientific and creative filming discussions combined with the whine of a heavy crane accompanied by the powerful sound of a high-capacity dive compressor, all topped off nicely with the faint smell of fish—then that is a Pristine Seas expedition.

Our expeditions are the very best example of laser-like focus, ambition, maximum efficiency of resource-use, high competence, and enthusiasm, complemented by a unique capacity for achieving the near-impossible.

As you aren’t here with us (and we wish you were!) this is what it looks like and we hope you’ll sense the energy and celebrate that you can feel the excitement of our expedition without having to smell like fish.

Dave McAloney filling the scuba diving cylinders. (Photo by Paul Rose)
Dave McAloney filling the scuba diving cylinders. (Photo by Paul Rose)

 

Jessica Cramp and Pelayo Salinas Deleon deploying "BRUVS" - Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems. (Photo by Jon Betz)
Jessica Cramp and Pelayo Salinas Deleon deploying “BRUVS” – Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems. (Photo by Jon Betz)

 

The Niuean Katuali Sea Snake, a species of banded sea krait that is endemic to Niue. The snake is venomous, but extremely curious and, more importantly, docile. (Photo by Manu San Felix)
The Niuean Katuali Sea Snake, a species of banded sea krait that is endemic to Niue. The snake is venomous, but extremely curious and, more importantly, docile. (Photo by Manu San Felix)

 

Eric Brown inspecting a deep sea amphipod that hitched a ride to the surface from 1700m on the National Geographic Remote Imaging drop camera. (Photo by Jon Betz)
Eric Brown inspecting a deep sea amphipod that hitched a ride to the surface from 1700m on the National Geographic Remote Imaging drop camera. (Photo by Jon Betz)

 

The invaluable "fish soap"! (Photo by Paul Rose)
The invaluable “fish soap”! (Photo by Paul Rose)

More From the Niue Expedition

The Expedition to Niue Sets Sail

Colorful Close-Ups From a Remote Coral Reef