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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #77

It has been almost two years since the 76th edition of the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week”. We have continued the “Wild Birds! Revolution” on our Wild Bird Trust Facebook page. Our mission to share incredible wild bird photography with the world now has 1,1 million followers.  Birds are the colour, song and dance of the natural world. Thousands of dedicated photographers around the world are documenting the wild bird populations they encounter with their cameras. When we launched this initiative in 2014, we kept it simple and focussed on getting beautiful bird photos into social media feeds. The community we wanted to support was the independently-motivated photographers, nature guides and birders that go out as often as possible to document wild bird populations. Apart from inspiring an appreciation for birds, these photos can serve as effective monitoring and conservation tools. The Wild Bird Trust‘s Cape Parrot Project relies on high resolution photographs taken by Rodnick Biljon each day to monitor a debilitating disease attacking the Endangered wild population. The Wild Bird Trust is currently redeveloping the website to better archive the “Top 25 Wild bird Photographs of the Week” and function as a hub for the global birding community. We would like to welcome Jordan-Laine Calder to the Wild Bird Trust team. Jordan will be working on Wild Bird Trust community engagement and the Wild Birds! Revolution. The world thought Angry Birds was a hit, wait until “Wild Birds!” come to life in social media across the globe. Please get your friends involved and following the Wild Bird Trust Facebook page!

Grey herons are found throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. (Bhavesh Rathod)
Grey herons are found throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. (Bhavesh Rathod)
Cattle egrets have spread across the globe with the expansion of large-scale agriculture, spreading from their original range in parts of S Spain and Portugal, tropical and subtropical Africa and humid tropical and subtropical Asia. (Arunava De)
Cattle egrets have spread across the globe with the expansion of large-scale agriculture, spreading from their original range in parts of S Spain and Portugal, tropical and subtropical Africa and humid tropical and subtropical Asia. (Arunava De)
The Curlew gets its name from it's distinctive call; a loud "curloo-oo". These wide-ranging waders are considered "near-threatened" by the IUCN as certain important populations have experienced concerning declines.
A large, cosmopolitan wader, he Eurasian Curlew gets it’s name from its distinctive call; a loud “curloo-oo”. (Pranesh Kodancha)
Northern pintails breed in the N areas of Europe, Asia and N America, wintering S of its breeding range towards the equator. (Chandan Hazra)
Northern pintails breed in the N areas of Europe, Asia and N America, wintering S of its breeding range towards the equator. (Chandan Hazra)
Long-tailed shrikes range across much of mainland Asia and the eastern archipelagos. Photographed here in India. (Owen Deutsch)
Long-tailed shrikes range across much of mainland Asia and the eastern archipelagos. Photographed here in India. (Owen Deutsch)
Brown pelicans are found in N and S america and are most prominent in the coastal areas of the S and W United States. (Leslie Reagan)
Brown pelicans are found in N and S america and are most prominent in the coastal areas of the S and W United States. (Leslie Reagan)
Great barbets are resident breeders in the lower-to-middle altitudes of the Himalayas, ranging across N India, Nepal and Bhutan, and some parts of SE Asia as far as Laos. (Pranesh Kodancha)
Great barbets are resident breeders in the lower-to-middle altitudes of the Himalayas, ranging across N India, Nepal and Bhutan, and some parts of SE Asia as far as Laos. (Pranesh Kodancha)
Spotted owlets breed across tropical Asia from India to SE Asia, often in urban areas. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Spotted owlets breed across tropical Asia from India to SE Asia, often in urban areas. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Black-winged stilts have a global distribution and seven subspecies. (Bhavesh Rathod)
Black-winged stilts have a global distribution and seven subspecies. (Bhavesh Rathod)
Chestnut-crowned laughingthrushes are found in Bhutan, China, India and Nepal. Photographed here in West Bengal, India. (Ramanan RR)
Chestnut-crowned laughingthrushes are found in Bhutan, China, India and Nepal. Photographed here in West Bengal, India. (Ramanan RR)
Small pratincoles are resident breeders in India, W Pakistan and SE Asia. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Small pratincoles are resident breeders in India, W Pakistan and SE Asia. (Firoz Al Sabah)
Buffy fish owls are found from S Burma and central India to the S and E of Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, peninsular Thailand, the Malay Peninsula, the Riau Archipelago, Sumatra Brunei, Cocos Islands, Indonesia down to Java, Bali and Borneo. (Partha Mukherjee)
Buffy fish owls are found from S Burma and central India to the S and E of Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam, peninsular Thailand, the Malay Peninsula, the Riau Archipelago, Sumatra Brunei, Cocos Islands, Indonesia down to Java, Bali and Borneo. (Partha Mukherjee)
Elegant terns breed on the Pacific coasts of the S United States and Mexico, wintering S in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. Photographed here in United States. (Salah Baazizi)
Elegant terns breed on the Pacific coasts of the S United States and Mexico, wintering S in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. Photographed here in United States. (Salah Baazizi)
Black-naped monarch flycatcher breeds across tropical southern Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Indonesia and the Philippines. (Rajesh Chowdury)
Black-naped monarch flycatcher breeds across tropical southern Asia from India and Sri Lanka E to Indonesia and the Philippines. (Rajesh Chowdury)
White-cheeked barbets are endemic to the forest areas of the Western Ghats and adjoining hills in S India. (Rudraksha Chodankar)
White-cheeked barbets are endemic to the forest areas of the Western Ghats and adjoining hills in S India. (Rudraksha Chodankar)
Black-throated parrotbills prefer the subtropical or tropical moist montane forests of Bhutan, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam. (Shantanu Bhattacharya)
Black-throated parrotbills prefer the subtropical or tropical moist montane forests of Bhutan, India, Laos, Myanmar, Nepal, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam. (Shantanu Bhattacharya)
The Laggar Falcon is native to the Indian subcontinent, but is not as common as it once was due to a number of threats including the use of Laggar Falcons as decoys to trap larger raptors. (Suranjan Mukherjee)
The Laggar Falcon is native to the Indian subcontinent, but is not as common as it once was due to increased pesticide use and their use as decoys to trap larger raptors. (Suranjan Mukherjee)
Stellers eiders breed along the the Arctic coasts of E Siberia and Alaska. Photographed here in Norway. (Antero Topp)
Steller’s eiders breed along the the Arctic coasts of E Siberia and Alaska. Photographed here in Norway. (Antero Topp)
A small, cosmopolitan shorebird, the Kentish Plover, can be seen employing its characteristic “run and stop” method of retrieving arthropod prey from the shorelines across its wide range. (Wasif Yaqeen)
Violaceous trogons are found in the humid forests of the Amazon basin and on the island of Trinidad. Photographed here in Panama. (Owen Deutsch)
Violaceous trogons are found in the humid forests of the Amazon basin and on the island of Trinidad. Photographed here in Panama. (Owen Deutsch)
Just like their roller relatives, Indian Rollers are well known for the males’ acrobatic mating display also known as “rolling”. (Ravi’s Click)
Tickell's blue flycatchers have a wide distribution in tropical Asia from India to Indonesia. Photographed here in India. (Pratik Humnabadkar)
Tickell’s blue flycatchers have a wide distribution in tropical Asia from India to Indonesia. Photographed here in India. (Pratik Humnabadkar)
Who needs two feet to fly? A greater flamingo photographed in India. (Ami Prabal)
Ruddy shelducks breed from SE Europe across central Asia to SE Asia, wintering in the Indian Subcontinent. (Sumanta Basu)
Ruddy shelducks breed from SE Europe across central Asia to SE Asia, wintering in the Indian Subcontinent. (Sumanta Basu)
Wire-tailed swallows are split into two subspecies, one throughout Africa, the other found in S and SE Asia. Photographed here in Pakistan. (Awais Ali Sheikh)
Wire-tailed swallows are split into two subspecies, one throughout Africa, the other found in S and SE Asia. Photographed here in Pakistan. (Awais Ali Sheikh)

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. Our blue-green living planet has seen cataclysms like us before and has always come back after the threat has subsided. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

See the last “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #76″:

http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2015/01/28/top-25-wild-bird-photographs-of-the-week-76/

Edited by Jordan-Laine Calder, Campaign Manager

Comments

  1. Uday saha
    Kolkata, kalighat
    March 10, 11:10 pm

    Partha mukherjee photography skills and knowledge was superb, congrats for Buffy fish owl,waiting for the next one

  2. Santosh Rajput
    Jabalpur (M.P.) India
    March 6, 1:25 pm

    Wild birds are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature, surviving global cataclysms and drifting with the continents across the ages.Good platform for , photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists.

  3. Shilen Nimbalkar
    India
    March 5, 2:38 am

    I WOULD LIKE POST SOME OF MY BIRD CLICKS.PLZ TELL THE PROCEDURE for it.

  4. Tushar Bhagwat
    Alibag, maharashtra, India
    March 5, 1:19 am

    Would like to contribute bird photographs. Hoping that quite a few of them get selected. What is the procedure for submitting ?

    Thanks in advance.

  5. Gert Kotze
    Ermelo. Mpumalanga. South Africa.
    March 4, 7:35 am

    I would like to participate and post some of my bird shots here.

  6. Dr Mahesh Patil
    dombivili MAHARASHTRA
    March 4, 12:51 am

    I WOULD LIKE POST SOME OF MY BIRD CLICKS,HOPING FOR THE SELECTION.GOT SOME GOOD PICS.PLZ TELL THE PROCEDURE.

  7. Dr Pradeep Rao
    Bangalore, India
    March 3, 9:52 pm

    Wonderful information. Great work being done. Keep it going.Congratulations.

    Dr Rao
    Consultant Pathologist
    Hobby : Avian n Mammal Photography