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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #78

The WildBird! Revolution is back in full swing and we are delighted to present the second “Top 25” of 2017! Each of these images is literally just a snapshot of a much greater journey. The photographers who contribute these photos have dedicated so much time, energy, passion and resources into capturing moments that would otherwise go unseen. We can all do our part to heighten awareness and compassion around the Earth’s wildlife and photographing the characters of the bird world is a noble and profound way to do so. A massive thank you to all our avid bird photographers for your continued support and to all those budding enthusiasts, post your photographs on the Facebook page and join the revolution! Viva!

“In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; and we will understand only what we are taught.”

(Baba Dioum, 1968)

A small, colourful, stubby tailed bird, the Indian Pitta can be seen (or more likely heard) hopping around the undergrouwth and Indian and SriLankan forests. (Sathish Poojari)
A small, colourful, stubby tailed bird, the Indian Pitta can be seen (or more likely heard) hopping around the undergrouwth and Indian and Sri Lankan forests. (Sathish Poojari)
Blacktailed Godwits are monogamous and unparired males fight over their temporary territories to impress potential mates. Photographed in Pakistan by Awais Ali Sheikh.
Blacktailed Godwits are monogamous and unpaired males fight over their temporary territories to impress potential mates. Photographed in Pakistan by Awais Ali Sheikh.
Contrary to their name, not all Kingfishers feed on fish. The Malachite kingfisher does belong to the fisher type but for now, a tadpole will do just fine. Photographed in South Africa by Louis Groenewald.
Contrary to their name, not all Kingfishers feed on fish. The Malachite kingfisher does belong to the fisher type but for now, a tadpole will do just fine. Photographed in South Africa by Louis Groenewald.
A parent Caspian Tern shelters its chick from the hardships of adult life. (Yasser Essawaf)
A parent Caspian Tern shelters its chick from the hardships of adult life. (Yasser Essawaf)
An endangered parrot endemic to New Zealand, the Kea is an unusal bird whose most endering feature has got to be its inquisitive nature and attraction to humans. (Chris Mckay)
An endangered parrot endemic to New Zealand, the Kea is an unusal bird whose most endering feature has got to be its inquisitive nature and attraction to humans. (Chris Mckay)
Eight kilometers off the eastern shore of South Africa lies Bird Island, home to the 65 000 Cape Gannet breeding pairs, the largest gannetry of its type. (John Vosloo)
Eight kilometers off the eastern shore of South Africa lies Bird Island, home to the 65 000 Cape Gannet breeding pairs, the largest gannetry of its type. (John Vosloo)
The Malabar White headed starling, an Indian endemic. (Kamil Hari Medon)
The Malabar White headed starling, an Indian endemic. (Kamil Hari Medon)
A Great Horned Owl embraces the winter chill in Illinois. While the female incubates her eggs for over a month, she relies on her mate to bring her food. (Janelle Marie)
A Great Horned Owl embraces the winter chill in Illinois. While the female incubates her eggs for over a month, she relies on her mate to bring her food. (Janelle Marie)
The most widespread species of the Flamingo family, a Greater Flamingo walks on water in Cape Town, South Africa. (Allan Holland)
The most widespread species of the Flamingo family, a Greater Flamingo walks on water in Cape Town, South Africa. (Allan Holland)
From the comfort of its tree-top nest, a Red-headed Vulture perveys its home, the Desert National Park in India. Like most India vulture species, the Red-Headed vulture has experienced a dramatic population decline - 90% in just 10 years - predominantly due to the use of the veterinary drug, Diclofenac. If we want to keep benefitting from the critical clean-up service these birds provide, we have to do all we can to save these magnificent birds. (Suranjan Makherjee)
From the comfort of its tree-top nest, a Red-headed Vulture perveys its home, the
Desert National Park in India. Like most India vulture species, the Red-Headed vulture has experienced a dramatic population decline – 90% in just 10 years – predominantly due to the use of the veterinary drug, Diclofenac. (Suranjan Makherjee)
"Like water off a duck's back". A Red-headed Duck preens itself in the Mississippi River in Iowa, USA. (Janelle Marie)
“Like water off a duck’s back”. A Red-headed Duck preens itself in the Mississippi River in Iowa, USA. (Janelle Marie)
The African Black Oystercatcher is endemic to the coastline, and off shore islands of Southern Africa and breeds only in Namiba and South Africa. (Allan Holland)
The African Black Oystercatcher is endemic to the coastline, and off shore islands of Southern Africa and breeds only in Namiba and South Africa. (Allan Holland)
At less then 30 cm in length and the smallest of the Podicipedidae family, its little wonder that the Dabchicks is also known as the Little Grebe. Photographed in India by Suma Rao.
At less then 30 cm in length and the smallest of the Podicipedidae family, its little wonder that the Dabchicks is also known as the Little Grebe. Photographed in India by Suma Rao.
When breeding begins, Yellow-wattled Lapwings will do whatever it takes to protect their brood. Here, a Steppe Buzzard gets a stern talking to. Photographed in India by Gesudraz Ataullah.
When breeding begins, Yellow-wattled Lapwings will do whatever it takes to protect their brood. Here, a Steppe Buzzard gets a stern talking to. Photographed in India by Gesudraz Ataullah.
As such proficient fishers, its no wonder the Osprey is a cosmopolitan and successful raptor. (Yasser Essawaf)
As such proficient fishers, its clear why the Osprey is a cosmopolitan and successful raptor. (Yasser Essawaf)
Bar-headed Geese hold the record for the highest migratory flight! They can fly at an incredible altitude 7000m with just 10% oxygen as they flap their way over the mighty Himalayas. Photographed in Pakistan by Awais Ali Sheikh.
Bar-headed Geese hold the record for the highest migratory flight! They can fly at an incredible altitude 7000m with just 10% oxygen as they flap their way over the mighty Himalayas. Photographed in Pakistan by Awais Ali Sheikh.
An ancient bird, the Brown Pelican has been around for 30 million years! Here a young pelican braces for landing in California, USA. (Leslie Reagan)
An ancient bird, the Brown Pelican has been around for 30 million years! Here a young pelican braces for landing in California, USA. (Leslie Reagan)
Saraus Crane breeding pairs defend their territory through a number of vocal and "dancing" displays. Their trumpeting calls are produced by their elongated trachea that form coils within their chests. Photographed in India by RupalVaidya.
Saraus Crane breeding pairs defend their territory through a number of vocal and “dancing” displays. Their trumpeting calls are produced by their elongated trachea that form coils within their chests. Photographed in India by Rupal Vaidya.
Previously targeted by "plume hunters" for their desirable feathers to the point of near extinction in some areas, Great Egrets are now protected and their future is looking much brighter. A pair work together to build their nest in St Augustine Florida, USA. (Gail Pfoh)
Previously targeted by “plume hunters” for their desirable feathers to the point of near extinction in some areas, Great Egrets are now protected and their future is looking much brighter. A pair work together to build their nest in St Augustine Florida, USA. (Gail Pfoh)
More common in Central and South America, the Green Jay is also found in Southern Texas, USA. A charismatic and social bird who is a frequent visitor to picnic tables. (Melissa Penta)
More common in Central and South America, the Green Jay can also be seen  in Southern Texas, USA. A charismatic and social bird who is a frequent visitor to picnic tables. (Melissa Penta)
The only Harrier species in North America, a Northern Hen Harrier hovers over a potential prey in California. (Susan Olson)
The only Harrier species in North America, a Northern Hen Harrier hovers over a potential prey in California. (Susan Olson)
The New Zealand Pigeon of Kererū, is a common sight on both the North and South Islands but is found nowhere else in the world. (Kereru Discovery)
The New Zealand Pigeon of Kererū, is a common sight on both the North and South Islands but is found nowhere else in the world. (Kereru Discovery)
A Thick-billed Flowerpecker tells a Oriental Whiteeye who's boss in Bangalore India (Arun Samak)
A Thick-billed Flowerpecker tells a Oriental White-eye who’s boss in Bangalore India (Arun Samak)
The Sri Lankan or Ceylon Frogmouth is a related to the Nightjars and also hunts for insects in the dark. (Anil Oke‎)
The Sri Lankan or Ceylon Frogmouth is a related to the Nightjars and also hunts for insects in the dark. (Anil Oke‎)
The Ocellated Turkey is endemic to the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, Guatemala and Belize. Photographed in Guatemala by Birding Experience.
The Ocellated Turkey is endemic to the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, Guatemala and Belize. Photographed in Guatemala by Birding Experience.

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. Our blue-green living planet has seen cataclysms like us before and has always come back after the threat has subsided. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Jordan-Laine Calder, Campaign Manager

See the last “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #77″:

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #77

 

Comments

  1. Mike (Mick) Jackson
    Durban, South Africa
    March 12, 5:41 am

    Gesudraz Ataullah’s photo is actually a Steppe Eagle being buzzed by a Lapwing, not a Steppe Buzzard! The Eagle is nearly twice the size of the Buzzard and almost 4 times the mass!
    Thanks.

  2. Tony Stoddard (Kereru Discovery)
    New Zealand
    March 12, 12:22 am

    What an absolute hounour to have my kererū photo selected. We are so lucky here in New Zealand to have some very rare and unique native bird life. It is such a privilege to be involved with the conservation and protection of these amazing birds that ask for nothing yet give so much back to us humans.

    Thank you again

  3. Susan
    Los Angeles
    March 11, 7:01 pm

    Thank you for sharing my photo of the Northern Harrier

  4. Chris McKay
    March 11, 3:27 pm

    Thanks for sharing my image of New Zealand’s Alpine Parrot, the Kea. Probably one of the most mischievous parrots in the world!

    https://facebook.com/chrismckayphotography

  5. Janelle
    Illinois
    March 11, 8:00 am

    Thank you for sharing my images. I love being able to reach people with my passion for birds and photography all at once.
    Janelle Marie (Janelle Pitula Photography)

  6. Susan olson
    Los Angeles, CA and Door County, WI
    March 10, 1:44 pm

    I love this site. I have a number of birder friends who are on Instagram but not Facebook. Is there a way they can submit photos other than through Facebook?