VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

1Frame4Nature | Esther Horvath

Flying over northern Greenland with Polar 6 research aircraft by Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research. During the three week campaign in 2016, the team flew a total of fifty hours from the Danish military base Station Nord in Greenland to direction the North Pole reaching 88th degree latitude. Greenland, DK, July 26, 2016, Esther Horvath
Flying over northern Greenland with Polar 6 research aircraft by Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research. During the three week campaign in 2016, the team flew a total of fifty hours from the Danish military base Station Nord in Greenland to direction the North Pole reaching 88th degree latitude.

What YOU Can Do: 

Each individual can bring important help by adopting a more responsible lifestyle: starting from little, everyday things. It’s the only reasonable way to save our planet, before it is too late.

–1Frame4Nature is a collection of images and stories from around the globe of your personal connection to nature. However small, when combined with the actions of others, your individual actions can impact real and tangible outcomes for the preservation of our planet. Submit your story now!

Polar 6 reserach aircraft flies at an altitude of 70 meters while pulling the “torpedo” housing ice thickness measurement equipment called "EM Bird" at an altitude of 15 meters. The Alfred Wegener Institute is the only institute in the world providing an airplane-based ice thickness study producing highly accurate ice thickness data and related information to the changing conditions in the Arctic. Arctic Ocean, August 1, 2016, IceCam / AWI / Esther Horvath
Polar 6 research aircraft flies at an altitude of 70 meters while pulling the “torpedo” housing ice thickness measurement equipment called “EM Bird” at an altitude of 15 meters. The Alfred Wegener Institute is the only institute in the world providing an airplane-based ice thickness study producing highly accurate ice thickness data and related information to the changing conditions in the Arctic.

iLCP Fellow Esther Horvath‘s 1Frame4Nature: Changing Arctic Ocean

“During the survey, please discuss only necessary issues though the headphones” requested Dr. Thomas Krumpen before taking off in the DC3 aircraft from Station Nord heading in the direction of the Nord Pole. In order to cover longer distances, the airplane had no soundproofing and therefore headphones were needed. The request was important because during the daily 6 hour flight, the aircraft would fly at an altitude of just 200 feet / 70 meters while pulling a torpedo-shaped ice thickness measurement device called “EM Bird” at an altitude of 15 meters. Such an expedition demands a high level of concentration along with having an experienced pilot.

Dr. Thomas Krumpen and Manuel Sellmann of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research discuss the results of the thickness measurements. Findings from the campaign revealed surprisingly low thickness measurements. Since 2010, the ice thickness has reduced by 42%, due to both rising air and rising sea temperatures. Arctic Ocean, July 24, 2016, Esther Horvath
Dr. Thomas Krumpen and Manuel Sellmann of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research discuss the results of the thickness measurements. Findings from the campaign revealed surprisingly low thickness measurements. Since 2010, the ice thickness has reduced by 42%, due to both rising air and rising sea temperatures.
Deploying the EM Bird for ice thickness measurement over the Arctic Ocean. Arctic Ocean, August 3, 2016, Esther Horvath
Deploying the EM Bird for ice thickness measurement over the Arctic Ocean.

The Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) is the only institute in the world providing an airplane-based ice thickness study producing highly accurate ice thickness data.

The mission aboard the 1942 DC3 aircraft is aimed at measuring ice thickness and changes in the Arctic Ocean. Lead scientist, Dr. Thomas Krumpen, has been overseeing the campaign called TIFAX since 2010, covering the same polar region, including Fram Streight and above Northern Greenland towards Nord Pole each year in July -August. During the three weeks campaign in 2016, the team flew a total of fifty hours during 10 survey flights, surveying 2300 miles/3700 km of ice surface. Findings from the campaign revealed surprisingly low summer ice thickness measurements. Since 2010, the Arctic summer ice thickness has reduced by 42%, presumably due to both rising atmospheric and sea temperatures.

Dr. Thomas Krumpen TIFAX lead scientist of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, starts to process data during ice thickness survey over Arctic Ocean. Arctic Ocean, August 1, 2016, Esther Horvath
Dr. Thomas Krumpen TIFAX lead scientist of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, starts to process data during ice thickness survey over Arctic Ocean.

The average atmospheric temperature in the Arctic region is growing twice as fast compared to other parts of the world. With continual increasing temperatures being measured in the Arctic Ocean, ice thickness is rapidly decreasing.

I believe these research findings can motivate us to make positive changes through daily and long-term choices. We can support the Paris Agreement on a personal level by working to hold the global average temperature below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels.

Melting glacier in Northern Greenland. View from Polar 6 research aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research during the Arctic sea ice thickness measurement campaign. July 26, 2016, Greenland, DK, Esther Horvath
Melting glacier in Northern Greenland. View from Polar 6 research aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research during the Arctic sea ice thickness measurement campaign.

Choices we can make:

  1. Globally, 14.5% of all greenhouse gas pollution can be attributed to livestock according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. 65% of livestock industry’s role comes from raising beef and dairy cattle. Reducing global beef consumption is critical to keeping global warming in check.
  2. Personal vehicles are one of the major causes of global warming. Choosing low CO2 or electric cars could reduce the CO2 emissions and slow down the increasing temperatures.
  3. Choosing to walk, ride a bicycle or taking public transportation, are healthier choices for the planet.
  4. Air conditioners are contributing to the rise in temperature as they emit hot air. Presently, the U.S. uses more energy to keep cool than all other countries combined. Reducing dependence on air conditioners would positively effect the increasing temperatures globally.

Each individual can bring an important help adopting a more responsible lifestyle: starting from little, everyday things. It’s the only reasonable way to save our planet, before it is too late.

Polar 6 research airplane of Alfred Wegener Institute. for Polar and Marine research flies over the Arctic Ocean during ice thickness measureent campaign, July 31, 2016, Esther Horvath
Polar 6 research airplane of Alfred Wegener Institute. for Polar and Marine research flies over the Arctic Ocean during ice thickness measurement campaign.

—————————————————————————————————————————

This article is brought to you by the 1Frame4Nature Campaign. Share a picture and story on Instagram with the hashtag #1Frame4Nature, of your personal connection to nature and tell us what action you’ve taken on behalf of our planet.

More stories from 1Frame4Nature

Comments

  1. Jeff Welker
    Alaska
    March 28, 1:42 pm

    What a great story by Esther and the AWI team. It is fabulous that this group is able to repeat their measurements year after year so that the changes can be so accurately recorded. The photographs are just magnificent.