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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #81

It’s the last day of March and the change of seasons is upon us. Here on the southern tip of Africa we say good-bye to the hot summer days and welcome the much needed winter rain. Up in the northern hemisphere, our friends are glad to put away their winter coats and are looking forward to a little spring time sunshine. All the while, the feathered ones among us are too feeling the changes. Having arrived home from cross continental migrations, many will be settling down for another challenging breeding season. Others might be bidding farewell to their newly fledged chicks as they brave the world on their own.
Whatever season you are facing or reason you are living for, one thing is for sure, the only constant is change, so let’s embrace it!

Thank you once again to all the photographers who have contributed their images, their passion and their talent to the WildBird! Revolution! Viva!

A Barn Owl takes a rest from its nightly hunting duties. Photo by Ann Warner
A Barn Owl takes a rest from its nightly hunting duties. Photo by Ann Warner
Spot-winged Tit by Shantanu Bhattacharya‎
Spot-winged Tit by Shantanu Bhattacharya‎
The African Penguin is the only penguin that breeds in Africa. It is listed as endangered partly because of commercial fisheries depleting their food resources. Photo by Anthony Roberts.
The African Penguin is the only penguin that breeds in Africa. It is listed as endangered partly because of commercial fisheries depleting their food resources. Photo by Anthony Roberts.
Masters of effortless flight, Griffon Vultures have been studied intensively for the soaring and thermoregulation. Photo by Nitin Madan
Masters of effortless flight, Griffon Vultures have been studied intensively for the soaring and thermoregulation. Photo by Nitin Madan
Once a thrush, now a flycatcher, the Bluethroat is a beautiful bird in its own right. Photo by Kallol Mukherjee.
Once a thrush, now a flycatcher, the Bluethroat is a beautiful bird in its own right. Photo by Kallol Mukherjee.
A Tricolored Heron treads lightly as its searches for prey. Photo by Teri Franzen.
A Tricolored Heron treads lightly as its searches for prey. Photo by Teri Franzen.
An intimate moment between too Coppersmith Barbets. Photo by Manish Trivedi.
An intimate moment between too Coppersmith Barbets. Photo by Manish Trivedi.
A Lilac-breasted Roller takes on a Yellow-billed Kite in Botswana. Photo by Anja Denker.
A Lilac-breasted Roller takes on a Yellow-billed Kite in Botswana. Photo by Anja Denker.
Sea birds, like this Dalmatian Pelican, rely on oils secreted at the base of their tail to keep their feathers waterproof. Photo by Rupal Vaidya.
Sea birds, like this Dalmatian Pelican, rely on oils secreted at the base of their tail to keep their feathers waterproof. Photo by Rupal Vaidya.
A male Northern Shoveler shows off his beautiful wing feathers. Photo by Narahari Kanike
A male Northern Shoveler shows off his beautiful wing feathers. Photo by Narahari Kanike
No bigger than a Mourning Dove, the American Kestrel is a successful fierce little hunter. and  Photo by Raymond De Jesus Asencio
No bigger than a Mourning Dove, the American Kestrel is a successful fierce little hunter. and Photo by Raymond De Jesus Asencio
A baby Sandhill Crane is called a colt! Photo by Jon Cormorant.
A baby Sandhill Crane is called a colt! Photo by Jon Cormorant.
A member of the "clean up crew", Egyptian Vultures provide an important service to humankind by cleaning up the mess we leave behind. The world will be a very different place without vultures. Photo by Pranesh Kodancha
A member of the “clean up crew”, Egyptian Vultures provide an important service to humankind by cleaning up the mess we leave behind. The world will be a very different place without vultures. Photo by Pranesh Kodancha
An Eastern Imperial Eagle on the move in the Tal Chapar Grasslands, India . Most populations of these Gian birds are migratory and winter in Northeast Africa. Photo by Shishir Saksena‎
An Eastern Imperial Eagle on the move in the Tal Chapar Grasslands, India . Most populations of these Gian birds are migratory and winter in Northeast Africa. Photo by Shishir Saksena‎
The Kea, New Zealand's Alpine Parrot with a lot of attitude. Photo by Chris Mckay
The Kea, New Zealand’s Alpine Parrot with a lot of attitude. Photo by Chris Mckay
A Little Spider Hunter is dwarfed by giant flower in Karnataka, India.  Photo by Ashish Chauhan
A Little Spider Hunter is dwarfed by giant flower in Karnataka, India.
Photo by Ashish Chauhan
A Brown Pelican just before it breaks the surface. Photo by Leslie Reagan.
A Brown Pelican just before it breaks the surface. Photo by Leslie Reagan.
The Tawny Eagle is widespread raptor but exists in three distinct populations; southern Africa, North Africa and the Western Arabian Peninsula and a third population ranges from Iran to Myanmar. This regal individual was photographed in Bangalore, India by Prasanna Bhat
The Tawny Eagle is widespread raptor but exists in three distinct populations; southern Africa, North Africa and the Western Arabian Peninsula and a third population ranges from Iran to Myanmar. This regal individual was photographed in Bangalore, India by Prasanna Bhat
With a wingspan of just 80cm, the Black Baza is a small bird of prey who eats mostly insects. Photo by Debapratim Saha.
With a wingspan of just 80cm, the Black Baza is a small bird of prey who eats mostly insects. Photo by Debapratim Saha.
Swallow it whole! The Malabar Grey Hornbill  is endemic to the Western Ghats and associated hills of southern India. Photo by Ram Vaidyanathan‎
Swallow it whole! The Malabar Grey Hornbill is endemic to the Western Ghats and associated hills of southern India. Photo by Ram Vaidyanathan‎
The Batelaur is so called for its impressive aerial style reminiscent of a tight rope walker. Juviniles like this one may only get their striking adult plumage after 7 years. Photo by Sharon Templin.
The Batelaur is so called for its impressive aerial style reminiscent of a tight rope walker. Juviniles like this one may only get their striking adult plumage after 7 years. Photo by Sharon Templin.
The Anhinga get its name from the Brazilian Tupi language and means devil bird or snake bird as when it swims you only see its snake-like head and neck.  Photo by Mindy Musick King.
The Anhinga get its name from the Brazilian Tupi language and means devil bird or snake bird as when it swims you only see its snake-like head and neck. Photo by Mindy Musick King.
The majestic African Fish Eagles gets taught a lesson by an angry Saddle-billed Stork in Cameroon. Photo by The Flacks Photography.
The majestic African Fish Eagles gets taught a lesson by an angry Saddle-billed Stork in Cameroon. Photo by The Flacks Photography.
The Green-billed Malkoha is a cuckoo but is not  guilty of the cuckoo's crime of leaving its eggs in another's nest. Photo by Silpi Patra
The Green-billed Malkoha is a cuckoo but is not guilty of the cuckoo’s crime of leaving its eggs in another’s nest. Photo by Silpi Patra
The Crested Hawk Eagle is also called the Changable Hawk Eagle presumably because of its many appearances... Photo by Pallavi Sarkar‎
The Crested Hawk Eagle is also called the Changable Hawk Eagle presumably because of its many appearances… Photo by Pallavi Sarkar‎

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Jordan-Laine Calder, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #80

Comments

  1. Sandipan Ghosh
    Barddhaman, West Bengal, India
    April 8, 12:44 pm

    I congratulate all winners for the excellent photographs…..surely more to come

  2. Arun Patwardhan
    Mumbai
    April 1, 1:32 pm

    The two intimate moment by Manish trivedi just touched my heart. Being a Mumbaikar in this busy life these birds represent a breath of fresh air and love to cherish their memories which is extinct.

  3. Dr Pradeep Rao
    Bangalore, INDIA
    March 31, 11:02 pm

    Hi,
    Congratulations on this wonderful effort.
    How do I go about submitting my photographs to the Hon’ble Jury, please?
    Am into serious Avian n Mammal Photography, as a hobby. Please advice.
    Thank you n keep the good work going.
    Cheers
    Dr Rao

  4. Fraida Gutovich
    United States
    March 31, 10:14 am

    Hi!!! How do I submit my images for consideration of Bird of the Week?

    Many thanks,
    Fraida Gutovich