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Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #84

Yet another week of 2017 has flown by and with that comes our Friday treat – The Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #84!

Thank you to all the bird lovers and photographers across the globe who have contributed so wonderfully to this movement. You and your beautiful photographs are what drive the Wildbird! Revolution! Viva!

Narina Trogon was named by the famous ornithologist, Le Vaillant’s, after a beautiful woman, Narina, with whom he shred a brief love affair during his travels in South Africa. Photo by Tim Cockcroft
The Narina Trogon was named by the famous ornithologist, Le Vaillant, after a beautiful woman, Narina, with whom he shred a brief love affair during his travels in South Africa. Photo by Tim Cockcroft
Wood Sandpipers in Pakistan. Photo by Farrukh Zafar
Wood Sandpipers in Pakistan. Photo by Farrukh Zafar
A Steppe Eagle shows off its impressive 7 foot wingspan. Photo by Ami Prabal‎.
A Steppe Eagle shows off its impressive 7 foot wingspan. Photo by Ami Prabal‎.
The South Island Takahē is a flightless bird found only in New Zealand. They were thought to be extinct in 1898 but after a careful search, they were rediscovered on the South Island in 1948. Photo by Tony Stoddard‎.
The South Island Takahē is a flightless bird found only in New Zealand. They were thought to be extinct in 1898 but after a careful search, they were rediscovered on the South Island in 1948. Photo by Tony Stoddard‎.
Two Great Crested Grebes create a mirrored image. Photo by Dilipsinh Chudasama‎
Two Great Crested Grebes create a mirrored image. Photo by Dilipsinh Chudasama‎
Ornithologists have recently discovered that when temperatures are scorching, southern yellow-billed hornbills dilate blood vessels in their beaks to thermoregulate andcoot
flamingo cool off. Photo by Francois Rademeyer.
Ornithologists have recently discovered that when temperatures are scorching, southern yellow-billed hornbills dilate blood vessels in their beaks to thermoregulate and cool off. Photo by Francois Rademeyer.
The Barking Owl is an Australian owl who gets its name from its "hoot" which is almost indistinguishable from the bark of a small dog. Photo by Chris McKay‎.
The Barking Owl is an Australian owl who gets its name from its “hoot” which is almost indistinguishable from the bark of a small dog. Photo by Chris McKay‎.
Unlike many other waterbirds like ducks and geese who have webbed feet, Common Coots have "lobed" feet which help them swim.. Photo by Arindam Halder‎
Unlike many other waterbirds like ducks and geese who have webbed feet, Common Coots have “lobed” feet which help them swim. Photo by Arindam Halder‎
Greater Flamingos at sunset in The Camargue, France. Photo by Christian Bagnol Photographe.
Greater Flamingos at sunset in The Camargue, France. Photo by Christian Bagnol Photographe.
The state bird of Goa, the Flame-throated bulbul, caught in mid flight. Photo by Md Auwais Shaikh‎.
The state bird of Goa, the Flame-throated bulbul, caught in mid flight. Photo by Md Auwais Shaikh‎.
Burrowing Owls have a higher tolerance for carbon dioxide than other birds - an adaptation that allows them to live in underground burrows where carbon dioxide accumulates. Photo by Melissa Penta‎
Burrowing Owls have a higher tolerance for carbon dioxide than other birds – an adaptation that allows them to live in underground burrows where carbon dioxide accumulates. Photo by Melissa Penta‎.
River Tern captured in Pakistan by NaiNy ShaH‎.
River Tern captured in Pakistan by NaiNy ShaH‎.
Red-footed Booby's are the smallest of the Booby species and are so nimble that they can catch flying fish from the air! Photo by Sjoerd Van Berge Henegouwen‎.
Red-footed Booby’s are the smallest of the Booby species and are so nimble that they can catch flying fish from the air! Photo by Sjoerd Van Berge Henegouwen‎.
Perhaps not as glamorous as their senior counterparts, young male Peafowls at least have less trouble taking flight. For now... Photo by Anvita Paranjpe‎.
Perhaps not as glamorous as their senior counterparts, young male Peafowls at least have less trouble taking flight. For now… Photo by Anvita Paranjpe‎.
A Golden Oriole loses her lunch. Photo by Narahari Kanike‎.
A Golden Oriole loses her lunch. Photo by Narahari Kanike‎.
The Yellow Eyed Penguin, also known at the Hoiho is a species of penguin native to New Zealand and is considered one of the rarest penguin species in the world. Photo by Chris McKay‎.
The Yellow Eyed Penguin, also known at the Hoiho is a species of penguin native to New Zealand and is considered one of the rarest penguin species in the world. Photo by Chris McKay‎.
A female Great Horned Owl returns to her nest in Lecanto, Florida.  These are one of the few animals who will eat skunks! Photo by Robert Strickland‎.
A female Great Horned Owl returns to her nest in Lecanto, Florida. These are one of the few animals who will eat skunks! Photo by Robert Strickland‎.
The Himalayan Monal is a bird of the pheasant family and is not only the state bird of Uttarakhand India, it is also the national bird of Nepal, where it is known as Danphe. Photo by Sunil Kadam‎.
The Himalayan Monal is a bird of the pheasant family and is not only the state bird of Uttarakhand India, it is also the national bird of Nepal, where it is known as Danphe. Photo by Sunil Kadam‎.
Two Little egrets in an airborne altercation in Sailkot, Pakistan. Photo by Tahir Abbas Awan‎.
Two Little egrets in an airborne altercation in Sailkot, Pakistan. Photo by Tahir Abbas Awan‎.
Mandarin Ducks are from East Asia but a couple of isolated populations exist in the United States that originated from collection escapees. Photo by Leslie Reagan.
Mandarin Ducks are from East Asia but a couple of isolated populations exist in the United States that originated from collection escapees. Photo by Leslie Reagan.
You don't have to be pretty to be beautiful. The Lesser Adjutant stork uses its powerful bill to catch and eat fish, frogs, reptiles, and even small mammals! Photo by Arnab Rayc.
You don’t have to be pretty to be beautiful. The Lesser Adjutant stork uses its powerful bill to catch and eat fish, frogs, reptiles, and even small mammals! Photo by Arnab Rayc.
Reminiscent of a calico cat, the Ruddy Turnstone gets it's name from it's foraging strategy of flipping over stones and pebbles in search of food. Photo by Dilipsinh Chudasama.
Reminiscent of a calico cat, the Ruddy Turnstone gets it’s name from it’s foraging strategy of flipping over stones and pebbles in search of food. Photo by Dilipsinh Chudasama.
Great Blue Heron feed their young fish, frogs and insects for about 80 days before they leave the nest. Photo by Teresa Hedden
Great Blue Heron feed their young fish, frogs and insects for about 80 days before they leave the nest. Photo by Teresa Hedden
Mallard ducks Northern Hemisphere dabbling ducks that have been introduced to all corners of the globe from Peru to South Africa! Photo by Peter Chromik‎.
Mallard ducks are Northern Hemisphere dabbling ducks that have been introduced to all corners of the globe from Peru to South Africa! Photo by Peter Chromik‎.
Hunting the threatened Houbara Bustard is banned but that hasn't stopped Arab princes and their wealthy friends hunting these birds both for the sport and because the meat is considered an aphrodisiac. Photo by Marzook Mohd‎.
Hunting the threatened Houbara Bustard is banned but that hasn’t stopped Arab princes and their wealthy friends hunting these birds both for the sport and because the meat is considered an aphrodisiac. Photo by Marzook Mohd‎.

Our mission is to build a global community around the freedom and beauty of birds in the wild as ambassadors for the natural ecosystems that they depend upon. They are the music, decoration and character of every terrestrial habitat on the planet and have been around since the dinosaurs. They are the witnesses and ambassadors of the awesome power of nature. The wide availability of good, cheap optics has opened their world to us for the last few decades. Amazing, affordable DSLR cameras with long lenses are delivery brilliant digital bird imagery to online communities.

We are in a day-and-age during which more bird species are threatened with extinction than ever before. The Wild Birds! Revolution aims to publish the “Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week” to 1 million people every week by the end of the year. That is a revolution that will change the world! Join thousands of other weekend naturalists, photographers, birders, experts, hikers, nature-lovers, guides, scientists, conservationists and artists that share the thousands of wild bird photographs submitted to the Wild Bird Trust website and Facebook page. Thousands of wild bird enthusiasts are going out everyday to photograph our planet’s beautiful birdlife. Pick up your camera, fill your bird feeder, open your heart, and join the Wild Birds! Revolution!!

Edited by Jordan-Laine Calder, Campaign Manager

Top 25 Wild Bird Photographs of the Week #83