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Flying Robots Serving in Singapore by 2015

This post is the latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series,  which profiles interesting information, thoughts and research into using  drones, UAVs or remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography, that Kike learns about during his travels.      Can you imagine going to a restaurant and being served by a flying robot? Reality might surpass your…

Explorers’ Hearts Full This Thanksgiving

National Geographic explorers kicked off their Thanksgiving celebrations by sharing with us some of the things they are grateful for. From nightly raccoon visits to the smell of the ocean, our explorers continue to remind us to cherish the earth and celebrate the world around us.

Something to be Thankful for: Growing Cranberries Sustainably

By Brian Milne It’s Saturday morning in Plympton, Mass., and the sun has yet to dry the dew from the windows at the Mayflower Cranberries farm, but owner Jeff LaFleur is already on a knee in his bog inspecting his crimson bounty in preparation for the fall harvest. “It’s a pretty big berry, as you…

Google+ Hangout: Get to Know India’s Curious Big Cats

As part of Big Cat Week on Nat Geo Wild, several National Geographic big cat researchers, photographers, and conservationists (including me) are joining together for a live video chat via Google+ Hangout Wednesday, December 3rd at 1 p.m. EST (6 p.m. UTC). This is your chance to get your questions about these beautiful, fascinating, and highly endangered animals answered by those of us…

Polar Bears Use Scent as a Trail of Bread Crumbs

By Emily Shenk National Geographic Imagine you’ve drawn a line across a jigsaw puzzle, and you’re following that line from beginning to end. Suddenly the puzzle breaks apart and the pieces move in different directions. How do you follow the line to your destination? In the case of polar bears, the destination is a potential…

Africa’s Last Tropical Glaciers: Watch for Free

The film Snows of the Nile has won a major award, and to celebrate, it is being made available to watch for free!

Asher Jay’s T-shirt for Big Cats Conservation

By Anika Rice “The unique power of art is that it can transcend differences, connect with people on a visceral level, and compel action,” says creative conservationist and 2014 National Geographic Emerging Explorer Asher Jay. Through her cause-driven artistic projects and campaigns, Jay sheds light on the world’s threatened wildlife and the causes behind the…

Michael Waldrep: Outward from Within—Mexico City

It’s tough to talk about a periphery without first talking about a center. I’m not planning to be too terribly strict with my definition of the “periphery” of the city over the course of my time in Mexico City; after all, with ever traffic jam and with every bus delay, the mental distances within a city yawn wider. When your train is delayed, it’s easy to feel on the margins, and (with investment in infrastructure, anyway) it’s easy to feel connected as well. In any case, I’ll come to the topic of delineating the extents of the city, the reaches that are the subject of the project. That’s the hard question. Spotting the center of the city–in many ways the center of the country– is strangely simple.

Short Film Showcase: For India’s Girls, Gardens Offer Escape From Early Marriage

Nearly half of India’s girls marry before they turn 18. Thanks to a micro-agricultural group that fosters financial independence for some 40,000 girls in West Bengal, 16-year-old Monika is able to sell gourds from her garden at a local market and put off an early marriage. Directed by Academy Award-winner Megan Mylan, After My Garden…

Mapping and Protecting the Biggest Cat in the Americas

The once unassailable jaguar now survives in a few pockets throughout North and South America. Explore an interactive map to reveal the corridors that connect these populations and are key to their livelihood. Then join us for a Google+ Hangout to explore the world of big cats for yourself.

Confronting the Rhino in the Room

Jaclyn Skurie and Madeleine May explain the complex situation in South Africa, where preserving land and wildlife sometimes clashes with humanitarian crisis.

The Mighty and Mysterious Mount Mabu

In the “sky island” forests of Mozambique’s mountains, researchers are discovering possible new species tucked away and isolated from the surrounding savannah.

INTERPOL Asks Public to Help Nab Environmental Crime Fugitives

On November 17, for the first time in its history, INTERPOL asked the public to assist in the capture of environmental crime fugitives. The landmark public appeal falls under INTERPOL’s Operation Infra Terra, launched in October and targeting 139 criminals from 36 nations. INTERPOL—the International Criminal Police Organization—is the world’s largest international police organization, with…

Chimpanzees and the Battle Over Human Nature

Were humans born to war? Or is warfare a recent, rare development in our history? Studies of chimps and early human civilizations give clues to the origins of this kind of violence.

Is Climate The Mother Of Innovation?

Toledo, Ohio’s summer battle with toxic algae is just the latest in a string of weather-related catastrophes to beset our nation’s water and sewer systems. Hurricane Sandy’s unprecedented storm surge caused more than $500 million in damage to coastal water systems. Last year’s Arizona wildfires that killed 19 firefighters also devastated forested watersheds in a…