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Albino Otter Proves to Be as Adorable as You’d Hope

If you spent a good amount of time studying, photographing, and protecting otters in the wild, how long do you think it would be before you saw an albino one? 10 years? 20?
Try more like 40.

Good News on #TigerDay: Tiger Population Rebounds in Parsa, Nepal

The tiger population of Nepal’s Parsa Wildlife Reserve has increased markedly, according to a camera trap study released on International Tiger Day (today) by Panthera and the the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). The Government of Nepal’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC), National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), Panthera, the global wild cat…

CITES Conference Will Test Commitment of Governments to Save Tigers, EIA Says

The 17th Conference of the Parties to CITES in Johannesburg at the end of September is the perfect opportunity for China, Thailand, Laos and Vietnam to announce real action to end demand for tiger parts and products, Debbie Banks, leader of the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) Tiger Campaign, said in a statement released in observance of Global Tiger Day…

Global Tiger Day: 45 NGOs Call for End to Tiger Farming, Trade

On Global Tiger Day #TigerDay this year, 45 NGOs are raising the alarm of increasing tiger poaching and call for ending all tiger farming and tiger trade

International #TigerDay: Cause for Celebration or Alarm?

By Gabriel Fava, Born Free Foundation

Today, the 29th of July, is International Tiger Day (#TigerDay). Does the day represent a cause for celebration, alarm, or both?

A Look Inside Ethiopia’s Falash Mura Community: Q&A with Filmmaker Lior Sperandeo

Falash Mura is the name given to the community of Ethiopians who practice the Jewish faith and claim the right to live in Israel. Every year, the city of Gondar hosts what is billed as the largest Passover celebration in the world. The Falash Mura community bakes and sews for days, preparing for the Jewish…

Pending Deal on Montreal Protocol Amendment Second Only to Paris Agreement

World climate leaders meeting in Vienna have laid the foundation for an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, the global treaty that phased out ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The amendment would address climate-damaging hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), the refrigerant chemicals that replaced CFCs but that can trap heat in the atmosphere at levels a thousand times higher than…

Research Brief: Red Wolves Are Recent Hybrids of Gray Wolves and Coyotes

By Virginia Morell A study of the complete genomes of 28 canids reveals that despite differences in body size and behavior, North American gray wolves and coyotes are far more closely related than previously believed, and only recently split into two lineages. Furthermore, the endangered red and eastern wolves are not unique lineages with distinct evolutionary…

Poaching of African Elephants Slows, but Serious Threats Remain, CITES Reports

The significant upward trends in elephant poaching have stabilized, but African elephants continue to face serious threats, the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) said in a news statement today.

The report is being released in advance of the next major conference of the world’s wildlife trade regulating treaty, in September, when world governments will make crucial decisions on the conservation of elephants and trade in ivory.

Best Job Ever: Hunting for the Bones of a Loch Ness-Like Monster

Aubrey Jane Roberts is a National Geographic Young Explorers grantee and a professional dinosaur hunter (aka paleontologist).

Saving Sharks and Coral Reefs in Malaysian Borneo

Borneo. The name speaks of wildness, of dense rain forests, biodiversity, of elephants and orangutans. Eighteenth century naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, co-theorist of speciation, natural selection and evolution, traveled extensively throughout Malaysia and Indonesia describing terrestrial flora and fauna. His work founded the field of biogeography, and Wallace’s Line describes the separation of species between the ecoregions…

Photo Update: How Technology is Reaching Pakistan’s Children with the Polio Vaccine

In our February story – Cell Coverage: Reaching Pakistan’s Children with the Polio Vaccine – Aziz Memon wrote about Rotary‘s work to replace traditional paper reporting of polio, maternal and newborn health data in Pakistan with more accurate and timely mobile phone-based reporting. This new program is being implemented almost entirely by female health workers, many working…

Urgent Global Action Needed to Stop Extinction of Earth’s Last Megafauna

A swift and global conservation response is needed to prevent the world’s gorillas, lions, tigers, rhinos, and other iconic terrestrial megafauna from being lost forever, an influential group of international scientists reported today in the journal BioScience.

Their analysis, entitled Saving the World’s Terrestrial Megafauna, covers the precipitous loss of large animal populations around the globe. The report included a 13-point declaration by 43 scientists and conservationists calling for acknowledgement that a “business as usual” mentality will result in massive species extinction. Read the declaration and study the maps showing the global decline of big land animals.

Why Research Matters to Mountain Lions in Wyoming

Mountain lions live like shadows around us, and most people have never seen one. Most never will. Yet on July 8, the Wyoming Game Commission granted these wraiths of forests and mountains a reprieve in several parts of the state, including Unit 2 in the northwest where Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project (TCP) operates. Unit 2…

The Emerging Role of Asia in Wildlife Conservation Practice

The practice of solving conservation problems for wildlife has presented more and varied challenges for researchers and practitioners in Asia, especially over the last quarter century. While human populations have grown, lands available for wildlife have steadily decreased and habitats have been degraded. Yet as conservation practice has matured, researchers are striving to make their science relevant to the issues at hand and practitioners have better tools and information available to implement solutions.