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Seen and not heard: Six months after the World Cup, little has changed for Rio’s Favela footballers

In many ways Breno Washington is a typical 15-year-old boy. He has the look of someone whose body grew slightly too quick for him, but he wears it easy anyway, like a pair of good jeans; he likes the Chicago Bulls and sometimes he smokes marijuana with his friends. Unlike most boys his age, however,…

Have You Seen the Largest Picture Ever Taken?

On January 5 NASA captured a1.5 billion pixel image (69,536 x 22,230) that requires more than 4 GB of disk space. Its is an image of the Andromeda Galaxy and it was captured using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. One image contains 100 million stars and takes you to more than 40,000 light years.  …

Dwarf Minke Whale

This post is the last in the Click! Click! Click! Series which profiles interesting photographic moments that Kike captures during his travels.   Dwarf Minke Whale ( Balaenoptera acutorostrata.) All minke whales are part of the rorquals, a family that includes the humpback whale, the fin whale, the Bryde’s whale, the sei whale and the blue whale.   Kike’s photographs are available at the National Geographic…

The Real Penguin of Madagascar

By Graeme Patterson

It has been a decade since viewers first encountered the popular penguins of the crowd-pleasing Madagascar movie franchise. In the 2005 hit, the penguins eventually find their way to the island of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean along with their old friends from the Central Park Zoo: a zebra, lion, giraffe and a hippo who accidentally got dropped off there. Adventures ensue, the running joke is that these visitors are all out of place on Madagascar, as indeed they are. Or are they?

Indonesia’s Indigenous Communities Use Ecotourism To Secure the Rights to their Land

From Chandra Kirana in Bogor, Indonesia. Six Indigenous communities have launched an ecotourism initiative that would show off their ancestral forests in a bid to develop alternate economic models that local government in Indonesia could embrace, moving away from extractive industries such as mining and palm oil plantations. The initiative, called GreenIndonesia, would ultimately help…

Salamanders Are Pretty Awesome…But They may Be in big Trouble

By Doug Parsons, North America Policy Director, Society for Conservation Biology

On recent visit with my two young sons to the National Zoo here in Washington, D.C., I pleaded with them to make a quick detour to look at the pandas. My 11-year-old scoffed, and made a beeline for the Blink and you Miss It exhibit for the Japanese giant salamanders. Slimy, small and cold-blooded as they are, salamanders don’t always evoke the same “warm and fuzzy” response from many zoo-goers as the larger and more charismatic mammal species.

Can Mozambique’s Hidden World—And Its Creatures—Be Saved?

We finish our expedition to Mozambique’s sky islands focused heavily on whether remaining fragments of forest can be conserved. I had expected to find new species and see beautiful forests, but I had not expected the destruction—or my poignant reaction to it.

Lions Confiscated From German Circus Start new Life in African Sanctuary

Maggie and Sonja, two lionesses seized from a circus in Germany, are settling into their new home in South Africa, “where they’ll have a second chance to live out their days in a nurturing and natural environment” at the Born Free Foundation’s Big Cat Rescue and Education Centre at Shamwari Game Reserve, the conservation charity Born Free USA said in a news statement today.

Obama Tackles Climate Change in State of the Union Address

“No challenge — no challenge — poses a greater threat to future generations than climate change,” said President Obama in his 2014 State of the Union address. “The best scientists in the world are all telling us that our activities are changing the climate,” he said, “and if we do not act forcefully, we’ll continue to see rising oceans,…

Get Involved to Protect the African Lion

It is estimated that there are approximately 35,000 wild lions in Africa. This is a large decline in the total population since last estimates in 1980 of about 76,000. The decline is largely due to habitat loss, loss of prey base, and increased human-lion contact. (Related post: Lion Numbers Plunge as African Wilderness Succumbs to…

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Otter Rock

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3 We walk on the ocean floor in Otter Rock Marine Reserve, and we may as well be underwater, the air is so thick with mist. The low tide has exposed a glinting stage of seaweed full of clefts and holes. The…

VIDEO: Young Women Rising to Save Lions in Mozambique

Celina Dias and Domingas Aleixo – featured in the newly released film-short by the EO Wilson Biodiversity Foundation (EOWBF) – were both born and raised in Villa da Gorongosa, the largest village in the park’s surrounding buffer-zone. Recruited to Projecto Leões da Gorongosa in 2013, they represent the first women from Gorongosa to ever be employed on a Park science project and the first Mozambican women to work directly with lions in the wild, to study and conserve them.

Terrified Baby Impala Becomes Young Cheetahs’ First Hunting Lesson

Professional guide and lodge owner Mikey Carr-Hartly was on safari in Kenya’s Masai Mara, when he witnessed a remarkable encounter between a cheetah family and a young impala. “We were in an area of the southern Mara called Majani ya Chai, not far from Sala’s Camp,” said Mikey. “It’s the ideal habitat for cheetah because…

Pictures: Whale Bone Memorials, by Nature and Humans

In the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas), once a major location for whaling, whale bones are all around, layered with history and meaning, and silently communicating their tales.

10 Things I learned at the 2015 National Geographic Seminar

Every year, photographers, editors, storytellers, filmmakers and world travelers gather at the National Geographic headquarters in Washington. Along with the long-awaited annual seminar, National Geographic Creative convenes all its members and the Magazine presents “Works in Progress.” Meetings, dinners, hugs, stories and smiles are shared by the photo community. “As journalists, our worlds can be…