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One Big Fish Is Making News, but There Are Many More Out There

The Internet is buzzing about one big fish, but many more monster fish are on their way to the National Geographic Museum.

This Scientist Made Superhero Headlines. Why Doesn’t That Happen More Often?

What prevents the majority of scientists from making the leap from the ivory tower to the front lines?

Satellite Cities: The Early Suburbs of Mexico City

This week, continuing in my investigation of the geography of growth in Mexico City’s metropolitan area, and following my most recent exploration of the wealthier, more U.S.-styled segments of sprawl in the city, I made a trip out to Ciudad Satélite, one of the oldest, and most famous suburban developments in the region. Thanks to the…

The thing about hunting

WHY THE HUNTING CONVERSATION HURTS CONSERVATION by Simon Espley The thing about hunting is that the topic is so polarising that it prevents meaningful discourse between people who probably have more in common than they care to admit. And, while the protagonists battle it out, the grim reapers continue to harvest Africa’s wildlife and other natural resources.…

Satsuma Fields: Encounters with the diaspora provoke reflections on what it means to be Japanese

When the Sakura Maru departed from Yokohama in February 1899 bound for the Peruvian port city of Callao, its 790 passengers must have had high hopes. The Meiji Government had been running campaigns advertising a better quality of life overseas, and the Morioka Emigration Company and other agents promised solid pay for four-year contracts on…

Sangay Volcano Erupts in Ecuador

In December we’d been walking on its slopes, collecting rock samples. One month after we departed, Sangay started erupting with ferocity again.

First Rules for Arctic Drilling Released

The U.S. Department of the Interior unveiled the first draft rules for offshore oil and gas exploration in the Arctic. The rules would require energy companies to clear a number of safety hurdles before being approved for drilling. “The Arctic has substantial oil and gas potential, and the U.S. has a longstanding interest in the…

Blue Halo Initiative Expands to Montserrat and Curaçao!

VERY EXCITING NEWS! The Waitt Institute has expanded its Blue Halo Initiative to Montserrat and Curaçao, building on the recent success in Barbuda. The new partnerships with these two innovative island governments and communities will help envision, design, and implement sustainable ocean policies for their waters. With the launches of Blue Halo Montserrat and Blue…

A Bat-tastic Beginning for 2015!

After catching bats all night, I crawled into my tent at 11:59 PM and counted down to the New Year, listening to lions call in the distance and a hyena whooping nearby …

Why Develop a Rapport?

In my last post, I mentioned being able to develop a rapport with the New Xade community. What does that mean? What does it look like? And why is it so important? Imagine someone – a foreigner speaking a foreign language no less – shows up at your home with a giant camera and says…

Bee With No Stripes Discovered in Kenya

It has a black head and a bright orange body, and velociraptor-like claws on its hind legs. It lives underground, not in a hive. And it lives by itself, instead of in the huge colonies we’re used to. Here’s the story of the discovery of the world’s newest-known bee. Bee-ing There The hot, dusty bush and deserts…

February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots and Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dangle from a hot air balloon over pristine forest, walk from Russia across Australia, protect Italy’s wildlife in a national park, share a language with chimpanzees, document Alberta’s tar sands, track the evolution of HIV, climb China’s mountains and bird watch, visit Morocco’s ancient bazaars, and ski New England’s unusually deep powder.

Google Science Fair Hangout: What’s Your Utopia?

TH Culhane isn’t interested in some fantasy perfect world, just a better, more beautiful carrying-out of the real one. How could you help make it happen?

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Managing Marine Reserves

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3   Part 4 It is a simple diagram, and Cristen Don and Stacy Galleher laugh wryly as they show us. Four overlapping circles represent their team’s responsibilities: “Policy and Administration (1 staff),” “Ecological Monitoring (2.5 staff),” “Human Dimensions Monitoring (1 staff),”…

Behind the Photo: Inside the World’s Largest Caves

Looking at Carsten Peter’s photo of a Vietnamese cave blanketed in a mystical mist, you could be excused for thinking it was the product of Hollywood magic.