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Liberation for Samburu Women Begins with a Song

If a Samburu girl in northern Kenya marries before she has been ‘cut’ (circumcised), tradition dictates that her family must create a small opening in the fence around the village, and the disgraced girl is asked to leave through the hole. Once she is gone, the opening is patched up, and she is forgotten forever.…

My Top Ten U.S. Ocean Stories of 2014

Given the cascading disasters the ocean faces from industrial overfishing, pollution, coastal sprawl and climate change there’s been some surprisingly good news in the United States this year. Here are ten stories – both good and bad – that impacted the blue in our red, white and blue. Pacific Monument Expanded President Obama expanded the…

Zero Invasive Predators

This week past the NEXT Foundation of New Zealand made the major announcement of start-up funding for a company named ZIP. Zero Invasive Predators (ZIP) aims to regenerate our native birdlife by transforming the way invasive predators are managed on mainland New Zealand. On small islands (in the range of 10,000 hectares) we have the…

With Water, Life Returns to the Colorado River Delta

Last spring, on the eighth day of the release of Colorado River water into its channel at the US-Mexico border – an event known as the “pulse flow” – I witnessed something extraordinary. Like most mornings, I headed out with my National Geographic team before dawn to find the leading edge of the river as…

Protected No Longer? Desperate Fisheries Managers Want to Open Closed Areas.

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown By the early 1990’s, decades of heavy fishing had depleted several of New England’s important fish species, including cod, haddock, pollock and flounders (collectively referred to as ‘groundfish’). Fishermen had been catching fish faster than they could reproduce and had degraded fish habitats by dragging nets. To help rebuild New…

Big Data Arrives on a Small Lake in Vermont

While visiting Vermont in late July, I took a day to catch up with colleagues who are studying lakes. University of Vermont (UVM) Rubenstein Ecosystem Science Laboratory director Jason Stockwell arranged for me to go out on a sampling run with two interns. Our destination was Shelburne Pond, a shallow lake located about ten miles south…

Next Steps for U.S. Pirate Fishing Rules

Do you know if your seafood dinner was caught and imported legally? Chances are good now that you wouldn’t be able to find out. But this week, a special task force of a dozen federal agencies released recommendations on how the U.S. can rein in illegal, or pirate, fishing and make seafood more traceable and sustainable.…

UN Climate Negotiators Ink Deal in Lima

Negotiators have reached a deal at United Nations (UN) talks in Peru, setting the stage for a global climate pact in Paris in December 2015. The agreement, dubbed the Lima Call for Climate Action, for the first time in history commits every nation to reducing its rate of greenhouse gas emissions. “As a text, it’s not perfect…

Feeding Conservation: An African Vision for Restoring Biodiversity

By Dale Lewis

Since 2003, the non-profit company Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) has been working in Zambia to help poor farmers improve their skills, grow surpluses, and receive above-market prices for their produce in exchange for meeting conservation targets. In managing the production and sale of these nutritious and chemical-free products, COMACO has committed itself to passing on above-market-price profits to farmers in the form of raw materials if they commit to conservation.

Hōkūle‘a: Making a Grand Entrance in Auckland

After several exciting weeks of traversing the Northland of Aotearoa (New Zealand) and interacting with incredible communities all throughout, our leg of the Worldwide Voyage finally concluded with a sail into Auckland, the capital city, and a day of ceremonies.

From Goat Herding to Lion Conservation: The Story of a Samburu Warrior. Part 1

Meet Jeneria Lekilelei, a young Samburu warrior who comes from the Sasaab area in Westgate Community Conservancy, Samburu, Kenya. Jeneria started working with Ewaso Lions in 2008 as a Lion Scout and has since taken a substantial leadership role in his current position as Field Operations and Community Manager. Jeneria is a wildlife hero and…

The Next New Species Could be in Your Backyard: Why Exploration and Discovery Matter – Everywhere

Gregory M. Mueller, Ph.D. Chief Scientist and Negaunee Foundation Vice President of Science Chicago Botanic Garden When we think about discovering new species, we tend to envision tropical rainforests, remote deserts or lofty mountain peaks. But researchers, including myself, are taking a closer look at the landscapes right under our noses – in my case,…

Snow-Laden-Trees in Central Park

This post is the last in the Click! Click! Click! Series which profiles interesting photographic moments that Kike captures during his travels.   Man in red coat under a canopy of snow-laden-trees.   This photograph is available at the National Geographic Online Store. Follow Kike Calvo on Blog,  Facebook, Twitter, Web, Tumblr, LinkedIn or Instagram.

Zimbabwe’s Reported Plan to Export Baby Elephants Raises Outcry Against Animal Trade

News that Zimbabwe has captured dozens of baby elephants from the wild and plans to export them overseas ignited a firestorm of alarm in conservation circles, raising new questions about the policies that govern the trade of live elephants. The elephants are reportedly headed to China, where they would most likely be held in zoos.…

Vote For Cape Parrot As SA’s Favourite Bird!

Click here to Vote for CAPE PARROT as South Africa’s favourite bird! The green-and gold Cape Parrot is our national parrot and are only found here, yet most South Africans do not even know they exists. Our Cape Parrot is Africa’s most Endangered parrot species with around 1,000 Cape Parrots remaining in the wild. Their fate is forever linked to…