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BP Memories that don’t fade

April 20 marks the 5th anniversary of the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. A federal judge has ruled that BP demonstrated “gross negligence” leading to the blowout and spill. Still BP (and former Pentagon) spokesman Geoff Morrell insists that the Gulf is now, “better than ever,” and the company is fighting claims…

One Colorado Town’s Answer to a Catch-22 of Water Conservation

A few years ago, the town of Westminster, Colorado, just north of Denver, came eye-to-eye with an issue many water-conserving cities face when a resident posed this question at a public meeting, “Why do you ask me to conserve, and then raise my rates?” With droughts dotting the country and a growing number of areas…

What’s Behind Malawi’s Decision Not to Burn Its Ivory Stockpile?

By Michael Schwartz

Malawi president Peter Mutharika recently decided to postpone the burning of roughly four tons of stockpiled ivory, worth around seven million dollars. He claimed that at least 2.6 more tons are still being held as evidence in the upcoming trials of suspected elephant poachers.

While his initial decision to destroy the ivory is being lauded by some Malawians, others question whether a burn is the best possible recourse. Some see confiscated ivory as disposable remnants of barbarism that only carry intrinsic value when attached to their owners. Others see it as revenue to help the country’s poor or to augment conservation.

This also broaches the larger debate as to whether or not destroying contraband stockpiles really helps elephants in the long run.

A SEA IN FLAMES

Though a bit imprecise, the time, approximately 9:50 p.m. on April 20, 2010, marks the end of knowing much precisely. A floating machinery system roughly the size of a forty-story hotel has for months been drilling into the sea floor in the Gulf of Mexico. Its creators have named the drilling rig “Deepwater Horizon.” Oil…

Palau: Leading by Example

If there is one country that leads by example, it’s Palau. This is a strong country, one that was a battleground for World War II, it has survived typhoons and earthquakes, and still the Palauans persevere. While their culture shows some Western influence, Palauan traditions remain steadfast. They thrive in one of the most beautiful,…

Google and the Green Economy: Lessons in Process Innovation

Guest post by Samia Mazhar Global efforts to reach a climate change agreement in Paris later this year are gaining momentum not only in the halls of some parliaments but also in the corporate world. In this guest post, an Australian scholar of project management and innovation, Samia Mazhar, explores ways one major corporate power…

3-D Modelling Corals on the Real Skull Island

On Skull Island, the skulls of head-hunting victims lie entombed beneath the skulls of their captors, while under the waves, a living treasure of coral is being enshrined digitally for all to see.

Mapping the Underground Mysteries of Socotra

Once they’d made the difficult journey to the cave entrance, the real journey began for these explorers on the trail of ancient rock art.

Keeping the Wild Yampa Wild

By Nathan Fey, Colorado Stewardship Director for American Whitewater

Cutting through the steep canyons and arid sage lands of northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah, the Yampa is the region’s lifeblood. A major tributary of the Colorado, which has been increasingly stretched as demand exceeds supply, and climate warms and dries, the river’s flows are eyed by downstream water-users in Utah, Arizona and California. That fact behooves all of us to take a closer look at how water is managed in the West.

Women Lead on Conservation in Nepal

“Women do most of the work in rural communities, they are the ones collecting firewood or fodder from the forests or fetching water from the faraway spring. Given how connected women are to nature, they are the most knowledgeable about natural resources and their connection to better livelihoods. Communities without empowered women are missing the backbone that strengthens them and helps them climb out of poverty.”

Speaking up for Elephants: Reflections on Vermont’s Ivory Sales Ban Hearing

“In a world where everything feels like it is moving at the speed of light, slowing down and watching an elephant in its natural habitat is calming and shows us the importance of paying attention to the natural world.”

That opinion came from 12-year-old Taegen Yardley, a sixth grader at Endeavour Middle School in Shelburne, Vermont, on April 8 when she testified before Vermont’s House Committee on Fish, Wildlife and Water Resources in support of a proposed state ban on ivory and rhino horn sales (H.297). Twenty of her classmates filled the ornate room to listen and show support.

Last Ice Area Expedition Launches

Climate projections forecast the total disappearance of summer sea ice in the Arctic by 2040, with the exception of one place: the “last ice area,” north of Greenland and Ellesmere Island in Nunavut. This area will likely harbor the largest concentration of Arctic wildlife that depends on the sea ice edge for survival, including bowhead…

When Civil War Made Humans Prey for Carnivores

In the third episode of Through the Prides, we learn how immigrants evade predators as they walk across Kruger National Park and we speak to carnivore experts about what would compel a lion to hunt a human. [VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED]

Bat Man of Borneo

Trudging through piles of guano up to 70 feet high, Donald McFarlane is getting to know the secrets of bats deep in the caves they call home.

Court Hears Arguments Surrounding EPA Power Plant Rule

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit heard arguments Thursday in a set of cases (Murray Energy v. EPA andWest Virginia v. EPA) challenging the U.S Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) authority to limit greenhouse gases from existing power plants under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act. There was skepticism from at…