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Andrew Howley

of National Geographic Society

Andrew Howley is a member of the National Geographic Science and Exploration team, working to share the stories of NG explorers and grantees online. For more than four years he produced the Home Page of nationalgeographic.com, and helped manage the Society's Facebook page during its breakout year of 2010. He studied Anthropology with a focus on Archaeology from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He has covered expeditions with NG Explorers-in-Residence Mike Fay, Enric Sala, and Lee Berger. His personal interests include painting, running, and reading about history.

Intriguing Burials, Artifacts Unearthed at Ancient Egyptian/Nubian Site

Our investigations into understanding life and death for the elite individuals buried in the Tombos pyramid/chapel structures at Tombos have been very successful this season.

Unleashing the Wild Soul of the Cat

Domestic cats outnumber big cats more than 600 to 1. Can our love of kitties be the key to saving the kings?

Happy Anniversary, Photo Ark! 10 Years, 6,300 Animals Photographed

Photographing every one of the 12,000 animal species under human care is Joel Sartore’s dream. And now he’s been living that dream for 10 full years.

Year-End Honors for Our Cutting-Edge Explorers

2016 has been an incredible year for exploration, research, and conservation—and explorers supported by the National Geographic Society have been at the top of each of those fields.

Writer James Welch: A Singular Voice From the Native American Renaissance

Today’s Google doodle celebrates a man whose work helped shape the Native American Renaissance and can still help develop cross-cultural communication in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Colorful Close-Ups From a Remote Coral Reef

Kike Ballesteros reveals some of his most colorful and finely detailed images yet of the strange and beautiful creatures that call the bottom of the ocean home.

Albino Otter Proves to Be as Adorable as You’d Hope

If you spent a good amount of time studying, photographing, and protecting otters in the wild, how long do you think it would be before you saw an albino one? 10 years? 20?
Try more like 40.

Something Fishy in Washington, D.C.

By Amy Werner Today is World Fish Migration day, a day best celebrated by raising awareness of the importance of open rivers and migratory fish, exactly what Rock Creek Park did at a 2016 BioBlitz fish identification on May 20.  The urban oasis of Rock Creek Park in Washington D.C., is often viewed as containing only…

Secrets of Stunning Ocean Photography

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Enric Sala has visited and photographed some of the most remote and beautiful places in the ocean. Hear him reveal what he’s learned.

‘Clockwork Lion’ in London Cries, “Time Is Running Out for Big Cats”

That’s the message of a new statue in Trafalgar Square, commissioned by Nat Geo Wild and about to be auctioned to raise money for National Geographic’s Big Cats Initiative.

Using Science, Exploration, and Storytelling to Change the World in 2015

This year proved that there’s still so much left to explore—from discovering a new human ancestor deep in a South African cave to protecting some of the last wild places in the ocean.

The Ocean and Our Explorers Need You

This week, just comment on Facebook or Twitter with “#donate $10” to help us explore, document, and garner protection for the most pristine areas of the ocean.

#PhotoArk to Illuminate St. Peter’s Basilica

Follow @NatGeo on Twitter and Periscope to share the excitement from St. Peter’s Square with Joel Sartore, and comment on Facebook or Twitter with “#donate $10” to support the Photo Ark.

It’s Elementary: Wildlife Is Going Up in Smoke

National Geographic explorer and creative conservationist, Asher Jay, is sharing her visual arts at #COY11, inspiring young people to action on climate change.

Facebook Chat With the Wisest Woman in the Sea

As #COY11 kicks off in Paris, record-holding diver and ocean advocate Dr. Sylvia Earle will be taking your questions about the ocean, climate, and our future in a live Facebook chat Friday, November 27, at 1 p.m. EST.