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Andrew Howley

of National Geographic Society

Andrew Howley is a member of the National Geographic Science and Exploration team, working to share the stories of NG explorers and grantees online. For more than four years he produced the Home Page of nationalgeographic.com, and helped manage the Society's Facebook page during its breakout year of 2010. He studied Anthropology with a focus on Archaeology from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He has covered expeditions with NG Explorers-in-Residence Mike Fay, Enric Sala, and Lee Berger. His personal interests include painting, running, and reading about history.

Dinner’s-eye View of a Saltwater Croc

If you were to look a saltwater crocodile in the mouth as it tried to eat you, this is what you’d see.

High-Tech Mapping Sheds New Light on the Atlantic Seafloor

The ancient Irish may have done it. The Vikings certainly did. And now a team of scientists is crossing the Atlantic by ship, preparing to make the most complete map ever of its floor.

Wildlife in London? Deer Me!

London’s Richmond Park may seem like a patch of untouched wilderness, but 700 years of human interaction have helped shape this urban oasis.

See Highlights From Hawai‘i Volcanoes BioBlitz, Discover Next Year’s Location

[This text is from an official press release.] HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Hawaii (May 20, 2015)—After two intensive days of exploration and documentation, the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park BioBlitz held on May 15 and 16, 2015, captured a vivid snapshot of the unique plant and animal biodiversity in the park. The event brought together more…

Help Make London a National Park City

Daniel Raven-Ellison doesn’t just see the forest for the trees, he sees the park for the city. Help him on his quest to make all of London a National Park City.

Exploring Civilization Beyond the Walls

Huge walls may separate cultures, but it’s how we interact across those boundaries that reveals the real story of civilization.

3 Surprising Discoveries From the Archaeology of Food

The archaeology of food is filling in the gaps between all the grand monuments and intricately crafted objects that occupied researchers and the public for generations.

3 Things to Know About the Origins of Chinese Civilization

China is big and it’s been around a long time. Top archaeologists peel back the layers of history and reveal how it all got started.

Scientists Witness Spectacular Flood Into the Red Sea

Somebody call Moses. Researchers have witnessed a remarkable Red Sea flood of their own.

St. Patrick’s Day Time Warp: Ireland Before St. Patrick

No farms, no sheep, no grassy hills—no pubs. This is Ireland at the dawn of the Stone Age.

Google Science Fair Hangout: What’s Your Utopia?

TH Culhane isn’t interested in some fantasy perfect world, just a better, more beautiful carrying-out of the real one. How could you help make it happen?

What’s Living Under These Elephant Seals?

Most people come to the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) to see elephant seals and penguins. Ginny Edgcomb came for the microbes.

Google Science Fair 2015: What Will You Try?

The annual Google Science Fair is back, bringing together the biggest ideas and the greatest experiments from young people all around the world, and you are invited to be a part of it.

Facts and Photos From an Australian BioBlitz

When groups from around the world gather in a place as wild as Australia for something as outdoors-oriented as the World Parks Congress, they’d better not sit inside wearing neckties and high-heels all day. To that end, the recent congress in Sydney included a BioBlitz, an intense, public, 24-hour inventory of all the different living species in the area. Inspired by…

Big Cats Q&A With Super Skier Anna Fenninger

There are very few ways a human being, without the aid of machines, can get itself to move faster than a sprinting cheetah. Downhill skiing is one of them.