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Andrew Howley

of National Geographic Society

Andrew Howley is a member of the National Geographic Science and Exploration team, working to share the stories of NG explorers and grantees online. For more than four years he produced the Home Page of nationalgeographic.com, and helped manage the Society's Facebook page during its breakout year of 2010. He studied Anthropology with a focus on Archaeology from the College of William & Mary in Virginia. He has covered expeditions with NG Explorers-in-Residence Mike Fay, Enric Sala, and Lee Berger. His personal interests include painting, running, and reading about history.

Join Live Twitter Chat With Explorers in the Okavango Delta

Join the team August 26 at 12 p.m. EDT, for a live Twitter chat by following @intotheokavango and @NatGeoLive and tweeting your questions with #NatGeoLive!

High Five! Give $5. Save Big Cats.

Don’t leave him hangin’. Share your own high five photo, donate $5, and tag five friends to spread the word that we can help save big cats in the wild!

#RebootTheSuit on Moon Landing Day

Robot satellites taking pictures three billion miles from Earth are pretty thrilling. But robot satellites aren’t people, and there’s no plan to ever bring them back. On this day in 1969 though, human beings themselves were walking on the surface of the moon—for hours on end. They learned to walk and maneuver in low gravity.…

Join a LIVE Twitter Chat With @PaulSalopek, Walking Across the Planet

What do you learn, walking 4,000 miles from Ethiopia to the Republic of Georgia? Ask @PaulSalopek yourself, in a LIVE Twitter chat, July 22 at 11:00 am ET using #NatGeoLive.

These Spiders Won’t Panic at the Disco

Get to know the bizarre and beautiful critters discovered on a recent expedition to the cloud forest of Ecuador.

Dinner’s-Eye View of a Saltwater Croc

If you were to look a saltwater crocodile in the mouth as it tried to eat you, this is what you’d see.

High-Tech Mapping Sheds New Light on the Atlantic Seafloor

The ancient Irish may have done it. The Vikings certainly did. And now a team of scientists is crossing the Atlantic by ship, preparing to make the most complete map ever of its floor.

Wildlife in London? Deer Me!

London’s Richmond Park may seem like a patch of untouched wilderness, but 700 years of human interaction have helped shape this urban oasis.

See Highlights From Hawai‘i Volcanoes BioBlitz, Discover Next Year’s Location

[This text is from an official press release.] HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Hawaii (May 20, 2015)—After two intensive days of exploration and documentation, the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park BioBlitz held on May 15 and 16, 2015, captured a vivid snapshot of the unique plant and animal biodiversity in the park. The event brought together more…

Help Make London a National Park City

Daniel Raven-Ellison doesn’t just see the forest for the trees, he sees the park for the city. Help him on his quest to make all of London a National Park City.

Exploring Civilization Beyond the Walls

Huge walls may separate cultures, but it’s how we interact across those boundaries that reveals the real story of civilization.

3 Surprising Discoveries From the Archaeology of Food

The archaeology of food is filling in the gaps between all the grand monuments and intricately crafted objects that occupied researchers and the public for generations.

3 Things to Know About the Origins of Chinese Civilization

China is big and it’s been around a long time. Top archaeologists peel back the layers of history and reveal how it all got started.

Scientists Witness Spectacular Flood Into the Red Sea

Somebody call Moses. Researchers have witnessed a remarkable Red Sea flood of their own.

St. Patrick’s Day Time Warp: Ireland Before St. Patrick

No farms, no sheep, no grassy hills—no pubs. This is Ireland at the dawn of the Stone Age.