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Brian Clark Howard covers the environment for National Geographic. He previously served as an editor for TheDailyGreen.com and E/The Environmental Magazine, and has written for Popular Science, TheAtlantic.com, FastCompany.com, PopularMechanics.com, Yahoo!, MSN, and elsewhere. He is the co-author of six books, including Geothermal HVACGreen LightingBuild Your Own Small Wind Power System, and Rock Your Ugly Christmas Sweater.

Volunteers Needed to Study American Eels

This week, a trio of organizations have asked the public to help gather data on one of New York City’s more slippery residents: the American eel (Anguilla rostrata). (We previously profiled the American eel as a Freshwater Species of the Week in August 2012.) Wildlife Conservation Society’s New York Aquarium, the New York State Department…

Tackling Overfishing on Many Fronts

As the World Ocean Summit winds down in Half Moon Bay, California, this evening, much discussion among the hundreds of gathered delegates has turned to overfishing.  There were perhaps as many thoughts on the subject as members in attendance from the fishing industry, academia, conservation organizations, and the media. But, several solutions emerged that received…

Can World Leaders Tame the Wild West of the High Seas?

Earlier this month, Indonesia announced the world’s largest sanctuary for manta rays. At the World Ocean Summit Tuesday, Peter Seligmann, the CEO of Conservation International, said the sanctuary “was not done out of good will, it was done out of enlightened self interest.” Seligmann said Indonesia had made careful calculations about how much manta rays…

John Kerry and Prince Charles Urge Immediate Action on Ocean Protection

The editor-in-chief of The Economist, John Micklethwait, asked a packed room at the World Ocean Summit if they thought the ocean was in worse shape now than when the conference was first held in 2012. Almost everyone held up a pre-printed red card that read “yes,” leading Micklethwait to say that the room had responded…

World Ocean Summit Puts Marine Issues “On Global Agenda”

Hundreds of representatives from national governments, environmental organizations, academic institutions, and corporations have gathered in Half Moon Bay, California, for the World Ocean Summit February 24-26. As the sun rises over the hills to shed first light on the Pacific Ocean, delegates are meeting to discuss solutions to international ocean governance and sustainable use of…

Filmmaker Greg MacGillivray Shares His “Journey to the South Pacific”

  Journey to the South Pacific, a new 3D IMAX film now in theaters, takes moviegoers on an adventure through the island paradise of remote West Papua, a province of Indonesia in the Coral Triangle. Narrated by Cate Blanchett, the film tells the story of Jawi Mayor, a young island boy who discovers the incredible diversity…

First Fish That’s No Longer Endangered: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, for the first time, a fish has been declared recovered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed this week that the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri) “has recovered and no longer meets the definition of an endangered species or a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973.” The silvery…

New Big-Head Fish: Freshwater Species of the Week

This week, scientists identified a new species of freshwater fish in the U.S., the cedar sculpin (Cottus schitsuumsh). Forest Service fisheries biologist Michael Young said in a statement, “It’s really exciting to find a new species of fish. It’s something you might expect in more remote parts of the world, but not in the U.S.” Scientists…

Watch Salmon Stranded in Pool Thanks to California Drought

“Time to pray for rain!” writes Thomas B. Dunklin, a self-described “fisheries geo-videologist.” Dunklin “combines his training in geology and fisheries biology to produce documentary videos on topics surrounding salmon, salmon restoration, and salmon culture.” Dunklin writes on Vimeo that the lower Mattole River on California’s north coast hasn’t seen any significant rainfall since late September,…

Rare Video Shows Deep-Sea Squid Fighting Epic Battle With an Owlfish

This rare video published on January 13 shows a deep-sea squid (Gonatus onyx) fighting to eat what appears to be a larger owlfish (Pseudobathylagus milleri). The video was made with the remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts, by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). The squid, also called the clawed armhook squid or black-eyed squid, lives in…

New Species of River Dolphin: Freshwater Species of the Week

Scientists in Brazil proposed a new species of river dolphin this week, the first such designation for the highly endangered group in a century. The proposed new species of river dolphin, the Araguaian boto (Inia araguaiaensis), was found in the Araguaia River Basin in central Brazil. The marine mammals were found to be isolated from other…

Bird-Snatching Tigerfish: Freshwater Species of the Week

Earlier this week we reported on the first confirmed video that shows what many people had long feared: that some fish can leap out of the water and snatch birds in midair. That fish is the tigerfish, a “megafish” that dwells in lakes in Africa, and which has large, razor-sharp teeth. Widely distributed across much…

Country’s First New Species of Fish Discovered

The science community welcomed a new species of fish today, called Eviota santanai. The striking, pinkish-mauve-and-white animal, a type of dwarf goby, was found off Timor-Leste (map), and is the first new species of fish found in the country, according to Conservation International (CI), the group that made the discovery. The new fish description was…

Minnesota Young People “Change the Course” and Save 7 Million Gallons of Water

In the above video, which was just released, Christian McGuigan is seen making a passionate plea to young people to help “change the course” of the Earth’s water crisis. McGuigan helps lead the Change the Course campaign in his role at Participant Media, the company behind such documentaries as An Inconvenient Truth, Food Inc., and Last…

Flooding the Grand Canyon to Restore It

On November 11, officials from the U.S. Department of Interior started a “high-flow experimental release” from Glen Canyon Dam in northern Arizona. Instead of the dam’s normal flow rate of 5,000 to 8,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) downstream, the dam released about 34,100 cfs for 96 hours. This was the second high release on…