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Clare Fieseler

of UNC-Chapel Hill

Clare Fieseler is a National Geographic Grantee and National Geographic Creative photographer. She’s currently a Innovation Fellow at Conservation X Labs and is completing her PhD in Ecology at UNC Chapel Hill. Follow her @clarefieseler on Twitter Instagram.

Colombia’s Former Guerrillas Need New Jobs. Why Not in Conservation?

Painted flowers of pink and blue grace the nails of two slender hands posed on the trigger and barrel of an assault weapon. Behind the weapon, a hot pink t-shirt serves as backdrop. There is nothing else in the frame. From the moment that I saw this photo last month in The California Sunday Magazine,…

Conservationists Clash on #CecilTheLion, Hunting, and the Future

Cecil the Lion’s illegal killing isn’t just trending in news, it was trending in the hallways of the International Congress of Conservation Biology (ICCB) last week. The biennial, five-day gathering of 2,000 scientists is structured by formal, planned presentations. But on the conference’s last day, an untraditional pop-up session called “#CecilTheLion: What Next?” revealed just how factionalized…

What a Group of 2,000 Biologists Talks About May Surprise You

“We’re not [just] talking about ‘how to save a rhino,’” says Dr. James Watson, President of the Society of Conservation Biology at the biannual gathering in France.

This Scientist Made Superhero Headlines. Why Doesn’t That Happen More Often?

What prevents the majority of scientists from making the leap from the ivory tower to the front lines?

“Cuba’s New Now” and the Oceans: Part II

November’s “National Geographic” cover story is about life in Cuba — but it’s also about the ocean. Explorer Clare Fieseler shares photos from the Cuban coast that help illuminate the human-ocean challenges embedded in the new article.

“Cuba’s New Now” and the Ocean: Part I

November’s “National Geographic” cover story is about life in Cuba — but it’s also about the ocean. Explorer Clare Fieseler shares photos from the Cuban coast that help illuminate the human-ocean challenges embedded in the new article.