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Carl Safina is author of seven books, including Song for the Blue Ocean, which was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year, Eye of the Albatross, Voyage of the Turtle, and The View From Lazy Point. Safina is founding president of The Safina Center at Stony Brook University, where he also co-chairs the University's Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. A winner of the 2012 Orion Award and a MacArthur Prize, among others, his work has been featured in outlets such as The New York Times, National Geographic, CNN.com and The Huffington Post, and he hosts “Saving the Ocean” on PBS. The paperback version of Safina's seventh book, "Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel," is available in stores July 12, 2016.

While you were celebrating Earth Day, the President’s son was out killing a keystone species

On Earth Day 2017 when millions were busy conserving and celebrating nature, President Donald Trump’s son was out killing a keystone species.

Why do we have a World Tuna Day?

By Shelley Dearhart One of the most incredible predators in our Ocean is in danger of being lost. Pacific Bluefin tuna populations have been in jeopardy for years and new allegations of illegal and overfishing activity by Japanese fleets create a dire need for conservation measures to be taken to protect this species. Populations have…

Scientists discover the secret to breaking down plastic: Beeswax-eating worms

Two years ago, biochemist Federica Bertocchini’s scientific work and beekeeping hobby collided into a major discovery: That wax worms are capable of breaking down plastic.

A date with killer whales

Wildlife photographer Jodi Frediani explains why April 20 is more than a holiday for smokers; it’s a day for whale lovers in Monterey Bay to gather & watch.

Misool bluewater shark baitball: A sign of conservation success in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

Photographer, filmmaker and conservationist Shawn Heinrichs documents new biodiversity, a sign of conservation success in Indonesia’s Misool Marine Reserve.

“The Fish on My Plate” review – Author and fisherman Paul Greenberg tells us which fish to eat, which to avoid and which we’re running out of

Author and fisherman Paul Greenberg decided in 2015 to consume sea animals “for breakfast, lunch and dinner…and sometimes snacks” for a whole year. When he wasn’t researching seafood recipes, cooking in or eating out, Greenberg, who is also a Pew Fellow for Marine Conservation and Safina Center Fellow, was traveling and meeting with the world’s foremost fisheries experts. He tells his story in a forthcoming PBS Frontline documentary called “The Fish on My Plate,” which airs Tuesday, April 25, at 10pm Eastern, 9pm Central.

Shark attack survivor says people should respect, not fear, the seas

Brian Correiar, a California-based diving master and certified diver for more than 18 years, says he’s always been more comfortable in water than on land. His sense of ease in the seas was seriously shaken on Saturday, March 18, 2017, when a great white shark attacked the 14-foot, single-person ocean kayak he was paddling in through Monterey Bay.

China bans ivory, prices plummet. Will this really help save the elephants?

The price of ivory in China has dropped by 2/3 since 2014. Can that help save living elephants?

Experts say marine protected areas are great but could be better with more staff and funding

A new study suggests many marine protected areas suffer from a lack of adequate staffing and funding–and that’s holding these areas back from reaching their full potential as protective areas for marine life.

The Grekos: A success story in the crackdown on illegal fishing

Investigative New York Times Reporter and Safina Center Fellow tells the tale of The Grekos, a case of an illegal fishing crackdown success story.

Animal neuroscientist discusses her career and the case for keeping cetaceans out of captivity

Many countries and U.S. states have recently banned the captivity of orcas and other cetaceans. Neuroscientist Lori Marino discusses what happens when these animals are kept in tanks and why she believes there is a need to bring them back into a more natural environment.

Montauk business launches crowdfunding campaign to fight seafood fraud with technology

Montauk-based sustainable seafood company Dock to Dish launches a crowdfunding campaign to upgrade their business with new technology that will boost their products’ traceability.

The vulnerable vaquita: Immediate action needed to save critically endangered porpoise

Scientists find vaquita populations continue to plummet, calling for more research and greater protections.

Underwater photography and films advocate for ocean conservation

Documentary filmmaker Christine Ren combines her passions for the arts, sciences and dance to advocate for ocean conservation.

Sound and the sea

New technology allows scientists to explore, study, and monitor noise in changing marine environments, and the growing field of marine bioacoustics is providing insight into the ways animals perceive their surroundings.