VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers


Dan is on a life-long journey to discover what it truly means to be a citizen of the world. Along the way, he is seeking the advice of elders, the wisdom of children, and the stories of anyone willing to share. With a focus on photojournalism and travel, it is Dan’s firm belief that telling stories through photos is one of the most powerful ways to get people to care about the world and all of its inhabitants.

Dan first started taking photos while living in the outer islands of American Samoa as a way to share experiences. Over time, the more he traveled and listened to stories of place, the more he came to understand what his role as a photographer needed to be. Today, Dan travels extensively throughout the Pacific Islands and Asia working on issues pertaining to climate change, culture, and youth. He hopes to bring about awareness on these critical issues and, with any luck, help to raise the collective social consciousness of the general public.

Dan is a regular contributor to National Geographic and the Associated Press as well as a crewmember for the Polynesian Voyaging Society, a Fellow of The Explorers Club, and a member of the IUCN Specialist Group on Cultural and Spiritual Values of Protected Areas. He is also a brand ambassador for Maui Jim and Waiola Coconut Water.

Contact: danlinphotography@gmail.com

Sailing Halfway Around the World to Find Our Oldest Ancestors

The crew of the voyaging canoe, Hōkūle’a, arrive in Mossel Bay, South Africa, and reflect on the immense significance of this location, as a halfway point of the Worldwide Voyage and as a bridge that connects the genealogy of all people on Earth.

What Do Voyagers Do While Waiting for Good Weather?

To minimize the likelihood of trouble at sea, our voyaging leaders pay extra close attention to the weather, ensuring that we only sail when the wind is favorable. As a result, there are often long stretches of time where we must wait patiently in port for the weather to shift. This, however, does not mean that we wait idly.

Witnessing the “Miracle” of iSimangaliso

On this Worldwide Voyage, we have learned to flexible in ALL things, but especially with timing. However, one thing that we definitely did not want to miss out on was the opportunity to visit the beautiful iSimangaliso Wetland Park in the KwaZulu-Natal region of South Africa.

What Does A Polynesian Canoe Mean to a South African?

Several days ago, Hōkūle’a made landfall at Richards Bay, South Africa. This is the first of several stops in the country where so many significant stories of the Worldwide Voyage will be told. Upon arrival, Hōkūle’a crew were greeted by community members of all different backgrounds. Among those who greeted the crew was Romeo Njabulo, a young Zulu man and member of the Roving Reporters.

Finding Ubuntu: Hawaiian Voyagers in South Africa

The crewmembers aboard the voyaging canoe, Hōkūle’a, are a few days from reaching South Africa on their Worldwide Voyage. In preparing for this leg of the voyage, the concept of “ubuntu” kept coming up as a foundational element of South African culture. We learned that “ubuntu” is a Zulu word that serves as a guiding belief for societal values in the country. But to truly understand the depth and beauty of this word, we know that we must experience it first-hand, much like we do with “aloha” back home.

Dying Wishes From One of the Last Remaining Micronesian Master Navigators

The sacred knowledge of navigating by the stars has been passed down for many generations in Micronesia. Today, with the convenience of modern instruments and technology, only a handful of people still retain this precious knowledge. These “Master Navigators” exist within a paradox where convenience often trumps custom and the gap between traditional and modern grows exponential wider with time. Nearing the end of his life, one Master Navigator has an important message for all those who are willing to listen…

Dust and Dancing to Celebrate Indigenous Australia

Every two years, the Laura Aboriginal Dance Festival in Australia brings together people for a spectacle of sights, sounds, and dust.

Protecting the Sea, Strengthening People, and Nursing Sea Turtles Back to Health

“It’s not just about protecting our land and sea. What we do also strengthens our people to stand up and stand together. That’s the biggest thing for us.”

Taking the Worldwide Voyage Underwater in Australia

The Great Barrier Reef spans more than 1,400 miles and is considered one of the best-preserved marine sites on Earth. Naturally, we needed to see this for ourselves. We needed to take the voyage underwater.

A Small Island Takes a Big Stand on Plastic

The Micronesian island of Yap banned the use of plastic bags to protect the local environment—and discovered additional benefits along the way.

Hōkūle‘a: Making a Grand Entrance in Auckland

After several exciting weeks of traversing the Northland of Aotearoa (New Zealand) and interacting with incredible communities all throughout, our leg of the Worldwide Voyage finally concluded with a sail into Auckland, the capital city, and a day of ceremonies.

Hōkūle‘a: Breathing Deeply and Treading Softly

It’s been two weeks since arriving in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to continue the Worldwide Voyage, which on this leg is inside New Zealand itself! One of our stops was the Waipoua Forest along the Hokianga coast to see the mighty kauri trees that lived therein.

Hōkūle‘a: Return to Aotearoa

After almost six months since departing from Hawai‘i, the Worldwide Voyage arrived in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to a Maori welcoming ceremony that was not only stunning to see, but historical as well.

Hōkūleʻa: Honoring the Kermadec Islands

This particular leg of the voyage, starting in Samoa and ending in New Zealand, is deeply significant because it follows the path of ancient Polynesian voyagers through the Kermadec Islands. Today, it is one of the most species-rich migration routes in the Pacific.

Hōkūleʻa: An Investment in the Future

The true success of the Worldwide Voyage will not be measured by how many miles Hōkūle’a has sailed but by how many people, especially youth, grow to become better stewards of the Earth.