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David Maxwell Braun

of National Geographic Society

David Braun is director of outreach with the digital and social team illuminating the National Geographic Society’s education, science, and explorer programs.

National Geographic Explorer-Correspondent Mireya Mayor Joins Amazon Conservation Team

National Geographic explorer, anthropologist, and conservationist, Mireya Mayor, is joining the Amazon Conservation Team to help communicate news of vital projects and expand global awareness about the plight of the Amazon region, the nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving South American rainforests said in a news statement today. “Dr. Mayor will be lending her expertise, as both scientist and communicator,…

Dutch Police Test Using Raptors to Intercept Errant Drones

With the proliferation of drones has come a rising threat to the security of aircraft as well as the possibility that the aerial devices could be used for crimes, or that they could threaten the safety of stadium crowds. Among the solutions authorities have attempted to deal with the problem have been using drones to…

Lost Lions Found in Northwest Ethiopia Raise Hopes That Big Cats Survive in Sudan

Exciting news for lions is that an expedition led by Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, supported by Born Free USA, has made camera trap images of the big cats in a remote national park in northwestern Ethiopia, an area the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) considered as only a ‘possible range’ for the species. As many as 200 lions may survive across the ecosystem between this part of Ethiopia and the adjacent national park in Sudan, according to the expedition’s analysis. There have been concerns that lions had become extinct in Sudan.

Earliest Cat Domesticated in China Was the Leopard Cat, Scientists Say

The wildcat (Felis silvestris lybica) ancestor of today’s beloved house pet was not the only species of felid to adapt to human society and be domesticated, according to research published in the science journal PLOS ONE. In China a different species, the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis), adapted independently to living with humans.

Hanging Out With Sea Lions at Los Islotes

Los Islotes, Gulf of California — “This is one of the few places where one can swim so easily with sea lions and enjoy them from their perspective,” said John Francis, sea lion expert and wildlife filmmaker, before we jumped into the water swirling around a set of rocky islets known as Los Islotes, on…

Creating and Selling Paradise

Florida is where winners go to play and everyone goes in search of the good life. Yet only a century ago, much of Florida was a swampy, mosquito infested frontier. In his latest book, For Sale–American Paradise: How America Was Sold An Impossible Dream In Florida, National Geographic News Contributing Editor Willie Drye tells the…

My Fulbright Life: Mireya Mayor, National Geographic Explorer

This video is published as an inspiration to our Fulbright-National Geographic Digital Storytelling Fellows and in celebration of the many National Geographic explorers and storytellers who are alumni of the Fulbright Program. The video was produced by the Fulbright Program in collaboration with the National Geographic Society.

Swimming With the World’s Biggest Fish, the Whale Shark

Bay of La Paz, Gulf of California — Jumping into the Sea of Cortez to swim alongside a whale shark is like being in a National Geographic documentary. The massive fish looms out of the murk, swimming toward you with huge mouth agape. Just when you imagine you might be sucked Jonah-like down the gullet of the…

National Geographic and the Gulf of California, a Legacy of Research and Conservation

When the National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration toured the southwestern portion of the Gulf of California in Mexico last week, visiting ecosystems, meeting and listening to researchers working in the region, it was a dream come true for John Francis, National Geographic Society Vice President for Research, Conservation and Exploration. Francis, the deputy…

Saving Baja Blue Whales for Generations to Come

National Geographic Sea Bird, Gulf of California–Since life began on Earth there has not been any animal bigger than one that lives with us today: the blue whale. To see this colossus of the ocean right in front of you, expelling a geyser 30 feet into the air as it comes up for breath, is humbling — not only because of…

Sharks Use Seamounts as a Compass to Navigate Through the Ocean

National Geographic Sea Bird, Gulf of California — The National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration (CRE) got to travel into the ocean realm of one of its most celebrated shark researchers last week, when it it was accompanied on a field inspection in the Gulf of California by Pete Klimley. The recipient of 11 National Geographic…

Finding the Rattlesnake That Lost its Rattle

An account of how we found one of the world’s rarest snakes, the critically endangered Santa Catalina rattlesnake — a reptile that distinguishes itself as a rattlesnake that has no rattle to shake at you.

National Geographic Undertakes Science Expedition to the Gulf of California

San José del Cabo, Mexico — Sea lions, whales (blue and humpback), bull sharks, whale sharks, dolphins and sea snakes were among the abundance of marine life observed by the National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration (CRE) on its 2016 field inspection, which ended this weekend on the southern tip of Mexico’s 775-mile-long Baja California peninsula. The…

Nexus of Art and Conservation to Save Big Cats​

Ten years after the death of Robert Dallet, a wildlife artist who painted for Hermès for decades, the Paris-based luxury brand is partnering with Panthera to honor Dallet’s legacy through the creation of the Robert Dallet Initiative for Wild Cat Conservation “to support the latest conservation science and innovation,” the two organizations said today. The initiative will…

The Seven Most-Read National Geographic Voices Posts of 2015

In case you missed them, South Africa’s famous “flying” sharks, Texas floods that washed “river monsters” onto the land, a video that caught a chameleon changing color, and a “sharkano” revealed by deep-sea cameras were among the most popular posts on National Geographic Voices in 2015.   1. Ten Photos of Great White Sharks to Take Your…