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A marine biologist and adventurer, David McGuire writes, photographs and explores the natural world, documenting wildlife and works to protect threatened sharks and critical marine ecosystems though the non profit Shark Stewards.

Trump Moves to Dismantle Monuments Including World’s largest MPA

President Trump announced a plan to consider scaling back protection of 27 national monuments around the country with serious potential impacts on marine, land and cultural resources. By expanding the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument off Hawaii in August 2016, President Obama created the largest ecologically protected area on the planet by increasing the area under the first Marine National Monument under President George W. Bush in 2006. Under the Antiquities Act, only Congress has the clear authority to reduce or nullify a monument designation, not the president.

Large Scale Marine Protection Introduced by Obama Under the Antiquities Act. What will President Trump do?

President Obama used his executive powers to protect 550 million acres of land and ocean during his tenure. Applying the Antiquities Act, President Obama more than doubled the existing marine protection in National Marine Monuments in his last year in office. Dating back to Teddy Roosevelt, the 1906 Antiquities Act has been used by Democratic and Republican…

Saving Sharks and Coral Reefs in Malaysian Borneo

Borneo. The name speaks of wildness, of dense rain forests, biodiversity, of elephants and orangutans. Eighteenth century naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, co-theorist of speciation, natural selection and evolution, traveled extensively throughout Malaysia and Indonesia describing terrestrial flora and fauna. His work founded the field of biogeography, and Wallace’s Line describes the separation of species between the ecoregions…

Fighting Dynamite With Marine Protection in Borneo

This is the devastation left by blast fishing also called fish bombing, an illegal but rampant form of fishing here in the Coral Triangle. In the practice, a fisherman tosses dynamite, or homemade bombs made from a bottle filled with fertilizer and kerosene lit by a short fuse into the water. The blast kills or stuns all fish within the vicinity, which are easily collected for market. Dangerous to the reef, this method also maims and kills fishermen, and it is not uncommon to see men with fingers or hands missing. What is left behind is a wasteland of flattened coral rubble that can take decades or even centuries to recover.

Searching for Orangutans but Finding Hope for Borneo’s Endangered Wildlife

“Hold it.” Hasri’s upheld hand tells us. He takes two soundless steps on the dried leaves of the lowland Borneo rainforest and listens. We pause for the strange sound to repeat itself among the jungle cicadas and morning calls of birds. From the dense undergrowth comes a cross between a moan and a hoot. The Orangutan…

Counting Catsharks in Malaysia

Borneo has a shark problem. Over 100 species of sharks live in this region of the Coral Triangle, a region of highest marine biodiversity in the world. Not only do large sharks like hammerheads, tigers and bull sharks swim here, but also endemic species like the Borneo shark, and small bamboo and cat sharks.

Coral Reef Restoration in Malaysian Borneo

Restoring coral reefs and documenting saharks and rays in Malaysian Borneo.

Documenting Endangered Species in the Remote Mountains of Laos

We have been in the mountains for fifteen days and the team is weary but triumphant. We have crossed lakes and traversed rivers, camped in the rain and trekked through the dense forest in search of the endangered Chinese swamp cypress tree.  After adventurous road travel and even sinking boats, we have located remote forests and found…

Messing Around in Boats in Quest of Endangered Trees

“Believe me my young friend, There is nothing absolutely nothing worth half so much doing as simply messing about in boats.” Kenneth Graham, Wind in the Willows Our team is waiting, while someone else is doing the messing about with our boat, and it does not half feel worth it. Our team of botanists, ecologists,wildlife…

New Years in a Land of Golden Buddhas

Eager to begin the search for the Chinese Cypress trees they’ve come to study, the team must deal with cultural and political detours of many kinds.

Sticky Rice and Stinky Fish, Expedition Laos Team Departs the Field

Comments Off on Sticky Rice and Stinky Fish, Expedition Laos Team Departs the Field

Our team of botanists and ecologists has converged at the foot of the Annamite Mountains on a National Geographic Explorer grant funded expedition. Dr. Phillip Thomas is a global conifer expert from the Royal Botanical Garden of Edinburgh, Robert Timmons a wildlife expert working in the region for decades, University of San Francisco graduate student…