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Emily is an oceanographer, explorer and marine environmental scientist. In 2011 she worked in the Gulf of Mexico on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Her work in the Gulf analyzing the oil spill, and the development of the oil and gas industry sparked her research interest in the Rigs-to-Reefs program. Emily has a masters in marine biodiversity and conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and is currently a marine scientist for an environmental consulting group and managing partner and explorer at Rig2Reef Exploration

Mobula Munkiana – The Secret of El Barril

Clap, slap, clap clap clap! Mobula munkiana, also known as “Munk’s Devil Ray” explode out of the water around us like popcorn. Each, about the size of a coffee table in diameter, they leap out of the water and flap their wings as if they were able to take to the sky and fly like…

Removing Oil Rigs from the North Sea – is Europe up for the Challenge?

The standards and rules for decommissioning offshore oil rigs are firmly established in the North Sea. When an oil platform is no longer economically viable, it must be removed. There is to be no dumping and abandoning these structures at sea. Save for substructures heavier than 10,000 tons, the bottom (so-called ‘footings’) of these structures…

Our Plastic Ocean

The world’s oceans are overflowing with plastic. Every year, around eight millions tons of plastic is unceremoniously dumped into our oceans (Lauren Parker, National Geographic, 2015). Plastic is an everyday part of life on earth, and I challenge you to spend a day where you don’t encounter it. It’s in our face washes and our…

Harvesting the Unlikely Fruits of Oil and Gas

I’m not sure what I expected when I rolled over the side of our boat to once again dive the long legs of Platform Eureka off of Long Beach. I had explored her depths before- but this time something was different…she had been ‘shaved’ down to about 65ft of all the mussels, scallops, strawberry anemones…

Artificial Reefing- The Blue Solution to America’s Aging Infrastructure?

The world’s oceans are littered with abandoned man-made objects and structures that are considered “repurposed” materials and dubbed artificial reefs. Old tires, toilets, navy ships, oil platforms, retired subway cars, and airplanes, have all either intentionally or unintentionally, been converted into artificial reefs due to the indomitable nature of marine life. Which of these reefs…