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Big Love for Small Cats

Every cat, big and small, should be valued and protected. We strive for a world where all domestic cats have a safe community in which to live, including those whose homes are outdoors.

A Ray of Hope for Lions

Simply by creating the right conditions for existing protected areas in Africa, we could yield a massive recovery in lions, and a host of other wildlife species.

As Lawmakers Debate Fate of Wolves, Film Commands Renewed Attention

Posted by Nicola Payne

Congressional bills aiming to strip protections for the North American gray wolf could push the species toward extinction. Speaking from her home in California, Julia Huffman, director of the award-winning 2015 documentary Medicine of the Wolf, explains the politics behind the War on Wolves Act, the role of wolves throughout human history, and how the esteem our ancestors once held for these creatures seems to be missing in us today.

On #worldwetlandsday, Stakeholders Form Alliance to Conserve Wetland Forests of the U.S. South

On World Wetlands Day (February 2, 2017), a diverse group of stakeholders have joined together to announce a major multi-state effort to conserve one of America’s most precious natural resources, wetland forests of the South.

Chimps in Danger – Time to Turn The Tide

By Will Travers, Born Free Foundation

We’ve done pretty much everything to chimpanzees.

We’ve shot them into space, used them to sell tea, smuggled their babies as exotic ‘pets’, dressed them up as clowns in the circus, experimented on them for dubious medical research – even, in some parts of the world, eaten them.

And yet we have failed to do the one thing that really matters – we have failed to protect them and their natural forest home.

Visiting the Magical Mountain Home of a Giant Ocean Wanderer

For years I’ve dreamed of visiting “Gonydale,” a remote valley reached after a three-hour trek across rivers, beneath towering pinnacle cliffs and through thick lush ferns. It is a lost world and home to some of the last of the Tristan albatross.

The Plight of Urban Wildlife

By Lila Brooks, Author of “The Chronicle of a Coyote Defender”

Animals are companions in the biosphere and part of the “web of life.” They are our fellow planetarians, destined to SHARE this planet with us humans and are not to be used or exploited for any reason.

EleWatch, a Sustainable Way for Humans to Co-exist With Elephants

With the escalating decline of elephants over the last decade, in 2015, the NGOs Des Eléphants & des Hommes, supported by Awely, wildlife and people, and IFAW France (International Fund for Animal Welfare) launched the Elephant-Watching initiative or EleWatch. The mission of EleWatch is to promote the economic and non-economic (ecological, cultural, patrimonial, social, and aesthetic) value of elephants and their natural habitats through development of national and international ecotourism programs across their entire geographic range.

South Africa’s Lion Bone Trade Disastrous for Wild Tigers

Posted by Environmental Investigation Agency

EIA is appalled that South Africa intends to export the skeletons of 800 African lions a year into a trade that stimulates consumer demand for the bones of more endangered big cats.

The Deep History of California’s Catastrophic Flooding

By Josh Chamot, Nexus Media News: Torrential rains are drenching California, flooding streets across the state. Is this normal? UC Berkeley geologist B. Lynn Ingram says that California faces megafloods about once every 200 years, but with climate change will make dangerous floods more frequent. Ingram explained how it works. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Cities We Make

By Philip Yang, founder of Urbem

Every branch of knowledge is providing evidence that socially mixed urban areas are key to the future of cities’ cohesiveness and prosperity. Social and environmental sciences are showing both the opportunities of a deeper integration among different socioeconomic groups and the risks of dystopia generated by growing dissent and intolerance. Yet, all around the world, cities are engaged in producing urban territories that are ever more contributing to spatial segregation rather than connection. Is this a revertible trend? Are there other plausible ways to shape cities and the way people live and work in urban settings?

A Climate Paradox: Rising Temperatures to Bring More Droughts and Floods

An interview with Climate Scientist Michael Wehner by Josh Chamot of Nexus Media.

The Pineapple Express storms hitting the West Coast are intense, causing massive floods and landslides — and replenishing reservoirs after historic drought. But is the drought-flood pattern tied to our planet’s warming? Michael Wehner, a leading climate scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, weighs in with what we now know and what we don’t.

New Excavation Season Begins at Unusual Egyptian/Nubian Site

Will we be fortunate enough to find another undisturbed burial where we can see exactly how a person was laid to rest?

The Common Ground of Rivers

Words by Chandra Brown
Photos by West Howland

I work summers in the Grand Canyon. This is the ultimate goal for a lot of career river guides; it’s what some consider the best guiding job in the world. I know I’m lucky. In the Grand Canyon, we take people rafting for fifteen days at a time. We try to hide from the summer sun. We tell stories of ancient things, and our own journeys become new stories.

How Studying a Delicacy Called Faux Poisson Could Net Real Solutions for a Hungry World

There’s a disconnect between the well-intentioned but wasteful practice of discarding bycatch at sea, and the benefits that bycatch can bring if it’s retained and brought home.