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Lack of Staffing, Funds Prevent Marine Protected Areas from Realizing Full Potential

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff.

The findings are published in the journal Nature on March 22.

From the Heart of Africa: An Introduction to William Stamps Cherry

William Stamps Cherry was the first American to set foot in deepest Africa, and the first American, if not the first hunter-explorer, to return alive from his journeys there. He had gained a name and a reputation for himself as a successful big game hunter and collector, and also as an explorer. He covered more than 30,000 miles of navigable Congo and Mobangi River tributaries (10,000 miles during his first trip working for a Dutch trading company, and 20,000 miles during his second as Chief Engineer of the entire French Marine fleet in French West Africa under Major Marchand), and was the first explorer to go deeper into the heart of deepest Africa, into the Central African Republic to the Congo’s largest tributary to the north, the Mobangi River, and then further still to the north and up the Kotto River to the headwaters and the Bahr el Ghazal.

Big Love for Small Cats

Every cat, big and small, should be valued and protected. We strive for a world where all domestic cats have a safe community in which to live, including those whose homes are outdoors.

TNR Is Dangerous Both to Cats and to Other Animals

People who consider themselves “cat lovers,” including proponents of trap-neuter-release (TNR) —programs that sterilize but then abandon domestic cats and so should more aptly be called “trap-neuter-abandon”—don’t mean to consign cats to ghastly fates, but in leaving them outside to fend for themselves, they do.

Hokulea’s Worldwide Voyage Arrives in Rapa Nui

“This is a wonderful opportunity to celebrate our shared commitment to preserving traditions, values, and environment, but also to discuss the challenges that we face in light of changes to our oceans, education, and well-being as island people,” said pwo navigator Nainoa Thompson.

How to Organize a Junior Bug Blitz

Of all things to do for a living, I do BioBlitzes. Also, I study the BioBlitz as a method. My work has taught me that the BioBlitz essentially has four facets: Science, Education, Community and, in some cases, Competition. I believe that it’s important to look at the BioBlitz as having these facets because to some extent the facets are antagonistic – they cannot all be maximized simultaneously without careful effort. Therefore, if you know what your goals are for the biodiversity event you can focus on these facets to get the results you are seeking.

A Refuge Found for the Most Heavily Fished Shark?

We are seeing only large females and very small juveniles, suggesting that the waters of Tristan da Cunha might be a blue shark nursery ground with large females traveling here to give birth.

Video Tribute Marks 40th Anniversary of Sheldrick Elephant Haven

Nicky Campbell is a journalist, broadcaster and wildlife campaigner. He and the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust have released the “Sacred Eyes” music video to mark the 40th anniversary of the Trust’s Orphans Project, which has saved hundreds of juvenile elephants left stranded by the slaughter of their mothers for ivory.

Old Water and New Knowledge at Cienega Creek

“How old is your water?” That’s not a common question among water users, or even in water education, yet it’s high on the list for Dr. Jennifer McIntosh. She’s an Associate Professor in Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Arizona whose focus is the elemental and isotopic chemistry of water. For her, estimating the age of water can be a key tool in understanding the structure and functioning of aquifers.

Intriguing Burials, Artifacts Unearthed at Ancient Egyptian/Nubian Site

Our investigations into understanding life and death for the elite individuals buried in the Tombos pyramid/chapel structures at Tombos have been very successful this season.

Young Traditional Navigators Aim for One of the Most Isolated Islands on Earth

“The leg to Rapa Nui presents a unique learning opportunity for the young navigators to test their wayfinding abilities and refine the skills needed to navigate aboard Hokulea,” said Pwo navigator and captain Nainoa Thompson. “Even if you’re extraordinarily precise, you could still miss it. And so it is one of the ultimate navigational challenges of all time.”

Big Cat Week Spirit Comes to a Big Apple School

Happy Big Cat Week! In the spirit of celebration, Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert just paid a special visit to students at P.S. 205 the Fiorello Laguardia School, a National Geographic Big Cats Initiative Sister School in the Bronx.

A Ray of Hope for Lions

Simply by creating the right conditions for existing protected areas in Africa, we could yield a massive recovery in lions, and a host of other wildlife species.

As Lawmakers Debate Fate of Wolves, Film Commands Renewed Attention

Posted by Nicola Payne

Congressional bills aiming to strip protections for the North American gray wolf could push the species toward extinction. Speaking from her home in California, Julia Huffman, director of the award-winning 2015 documentary Medicine of the Wolf, explains the politics behind the War on Wolves Act, the role of wolves throughout human history, and how the esteem our ancestors once held for these creatures seems to be missing in us today.

On #worldwetlandsday, Stakeholders Form Alliance to Conserve Wetland Forests of the U.S. South

On World Wetlands Day (February 2, 2017), a diverse group of stakeholders have joined together to announce a major multi-state effort to conserve one of America’s most precious natural resources, wetland forests of the South.