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Lost & Found: Nature Stories That Will Make You Smile

What can be more heartening than a species that returns from the dead? Enter the “Lost and Found” storytelling project, which is pushing the conversation around conservation away from “doom and gloom” and towards a more optimist outlook.

Interview With Emmanuel de Merode, Director of Virunga National Park

By Scott Ramsay, Love Wild Africa Emmanuel de Merode has one of Africa’s most challenging jobs. As director of the 7,800-square-kilometer [3,000-square-mile, a little smaller than Delaware] Virunga National Park in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, he is responsible for the management of Africa’s oldest national park, a World Heritage Site located in one of the…

Hokulea Greeted by Mayor of Mataiea and Over 500 Community Members

In a grand welcoming ceremony, over 500 third graders and college students from Mairipehe Primary School, Nuutafaratea Primary School, Matairea Primary School, and Teva I Uta College celebrated the shared malama honua vision of caring for the oceans and land for future generations in Tahitian, French and English.

Rare Parakeets Benefit From Reserve Expansion

In good news for several globally threatened bird species including El Oro Parakeet, the nonprofit conservation group Fundación Jocotoco, with the support of American Bird Conservancy (ABC), Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC), World Land Trust (WLT), and other donors, has secured critical habitat and expanded its Buenaventura Reserve in Ecuador.

Why Are Elephants in Northern Botswana Migrating South Into Previously Unoccupied Habitat?

By Oscar Nkala

Elephants from national parks in northern Botswana have started migrating south, deep into the semi-arid Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR), which has no history as an elephant range, a leading elephant monitoring group notes.

In a report that gives insight into an ongoing aerial operation to track internal elephant movements, Kasane-based Elephants Without Borders (EWB) says that a decrease in migratory elephants’ movements across Botswana’s northern border from Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Namibia has coincided with more herds venturing farther south into the CKGR.

A Win for Both Nature and Fishermen in Mauritius

Last year, the Mauritian government, in partnership with local NGOs and Smartfish, led the first national octopus fishing closure for two months of the year. It went … swimmingly.

This Earth Day, Let’s Stand Up for Canadian Wildlife

By Gabriel Wildgen, Humane Society International/Canada

Canadians take pride in wild animals as symbols of our country’s deep connection to nature. Images of beavers, caribous, loons and polar bears adorn Canadian coins. Canada’s major airports welcome visitors with murals of breathtaking landscapes, complete with magnificent bears, whales and birds. These same visitors might also be shocked, however, to learn how abysmal many of Canada’s wildlife policies are, and that they’re made all the more glaringly apparent during April, when the world celebrates Earth Day.

Traditional Song and Dance Welcome Hokulea to Tahiti

“You could feel it from the canoe. The community here was overwhelmingly happy and thrilled with love in their hearts that Hokulea and Hikianalia were there,” says Kala Tanaka, captain and navigator of Hikianalia.

Africa’s protected areas missing 75 percent of their savanna elephants

In a study published today in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, colleagues and I estimate how many savanna elephants Africa’s protected areas would support if not for widespread poaching. The results are sobering. Collectively, these parks are missing 75 percent of their elephants, nearly three-quarters of a million individuals.

We’ve all heard that elephants are in trouble. Now we know just how much.

Hokulea and Hikianalia Arrive in Tahiti Nearing End of Round-the-World Trip

The legendary sister canoes are reunited, anticipating the final deep-sea leg of the Worldwide Voyage

Amidst congressional criticism, archaeologists take aim at the world’s big questions

If scientists are able to understand how climate change and human impacts helped to drive the extinction of these ancient American megafauna, she says, perhaps we can figure out ways to mitigate the global-scale extinction crisis we find ourselves in today.

Global Wetlands Youth Photo Contest 2017: Winner and Highly Commended Finalists

“Wetlands that help us cope with extreme weather events” was the theme of the Wetlands Youth Photo contest, organized by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands from 2 February to 2 March 2017. Due to climate change, extreme weather events such as storms, floods and droughts are on the increase. When well-managed, healthy wetlands absorb and…

Consider the Octopus

Octopuses can taste with their skin, resist a pull 1,000 times their own weight, change color and shape, squirt ink, and inject venom. And even giant Pacifics—the biggest of the 250 octopus species, sometimes weighing 100 pounds—can pour their baggy, boneless bodies through an opening the size of an orange.

What’s more—and this is the most exciting aspect of this sea-dwelling “alien”—an octopus can recognize individual humans and even make friends with them. Octopuses are remarkably smart.

The Conservation Group That’s Working to End Shark Fin Sales and Distribution in the UK by 2023

By Dominique Maingot

It is estimated that over 100 million sharks are killed each year by unsustainable fishing methods, some leading to their entanglement in nets as bycatch or the direct targeting of their fins. Despite the EU’s passing of a regional agreement on shark conservation and management in 2009, and additional species listings under annexes to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), unregulated protections and species-specific management approaches continue to enable loopholes for shark fin trading worldwide.

With the help of its dedicated volunteers and scientists, Fin Fighters, a UK-based conservation organization, is working diligently to understand these issues in areas where data on illegal shark catches and genetic populations remain quite limited.

Lack of Staffing, Funds Prevent Marine Protected Areas from Realizing Full Potential

Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff.

The findings are published in the journal Nature on March 22.