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Cities We Make

By Philip Yang, founder of Urbem

Every branch of knowledge is providing evidence that socially mixed urban areas are key to the future of cities’ cohesiveness and prosperity. Social and environmental sciences are showing both the opportunities of a deeper integration among different socioeconomic groups and the risks of dystopia generated by growing dissent and intolerance. Yet, all around the world, cities are engaged in producing urban territories that are ever more contributing to spatial segregation rather than connection. Is this a revertible trend? Are there other plausible ways to shape cities and the way people live and work in urban settings?

A Climate Paradox: Rising Temperatures to Bring More Droughts and Floods

An interview with Climate Scientist Michael Wehner by Josh Chamot of Nexus Media.

The Pineapple Express storms hitting the West Coast are intense, causing massive floods and landslides — and replenishing reservoirs after historic drought. But is the drought-flood pattern tied to our planet’s warming? Michael Wehner, a leading climate scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, weighs in with what we now know and what we don’t.

New Excavation Season Begins at Unusual Egyptian/Nubian Site

Will we be fortunate enough to find another undisturbed burial where we can see exactly how a person was laid to rest?

The Common Ground of Rivers

Words by Chandra Brown
Photos by West Howland

I work summers in the Grand Canyon. This is the ultimate goal for a lot of career river guides; it’s what some consider the best guiding job in the world. I know I’m lucky. In the Grand Canyon, we take people rafting for fifteen days at a time. We try to hide from the summer sun. We tell stories of ancient things, and our own journeys become new stories.

How Studying a Delicacy Called Faux Poisson Could Net Real Solutions for a Hungry World

There’s a disconnect between the well-intentioned but wasteful practice of discarding bycatch at sea, and the benefits that bycatch can bring if it’s retained and brought home.

The Powerful Voices of Women at Standing Rock

Women—representing many places, ages, tribes, and other identities—are core to the story of Standing Rock. They run kitchens, start schools, organize supplies, provide healing, and offer wisdom. These are their words.

The Planet’s Air Conditioner Needs a Fix

By Margaret Williams

Over and over again, science is showing us that the Arctic is in big trouble due to climate change. Air temperatures are warming, sea ice is decreasing, permafrost is thawing, and communities and wildlife are feeling the impacts. But the most concerning fact of all? If the Arctic is in trouble, we’re all in trouble.

Red Fish / Black Snake

Words by Chandra Brown
Photos by Robin Carleton

Almost two months after protesters began to gather against the “black snake” – the Dakota Access oil Pipeline – a much smaller protest came to a reservoir on the Snake River, the largest tributary to the Columbia. At the Free the Snake flotilla, kayakers, fishermen, and tribal representatives called for the return of the salmon to the people and waters from which they are rapidly disappearing.

Change, Struggle, and What’s Under the Hood of a Cuban Taxi

In the U.S., change might be seen in the newest model of iPhone. In Cuba, change is manifest everyday by continually adapting yesterday’s material realities to today’s needs.

How to Catch a Bat

By Becky Beamer Kasanka National Park, Zambia From late October through mid December, the largest migration of mammals on the planet, Straw-colored Fruit Bats (Eidolon helvum), join the already diverse cross section of bats in Kasanka National Park. This bat hot spot attracts attention from bat researchers around the world including Helen Taylor-Boyd, Rob Mies,…

Water In Plain Sight

The dynamic properties of water present opportunities to better manage our resources—as well as address our global environment challenges. A brief guide to how water moves.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Statement on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Decision to Not Grant Easement

After months of protest and asking for their concerns over water safety, cultural preservation, and historic treaty rights to be heard, the Standing Rock Sioux are celebrating the U.S. Army’s decision not to grant the current easement to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Explorers and Students Team Up to Start the Year Off With a ROAR

Sharing firsthand experiences and lessons from the field, National Geographic Big Cats Initiative explorers are helping spread their boundless knowledge and affection for the wild to the next generation.

Dreams and Reality in la Habana

Growing up in a Cuban-American family, Mario Machado had the incredible fortune of absorbing a near-mythical image of the island that his grandfather had left as a boy in 1946. Now he’s writing his own chapter in the story.

Understanding the Mystery of the World’s Largest Mammal Migration

What does it feel like to be surrounded by 8-10 million bats? There is only one spot on earth where you can have this experience and explore the mystery surrounding this congregation.