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6 Ways to Save the Salton Sea and Colorado Delta

By Benny Andrés With scientific modeling foreshadowing megadroughts in the Southwest and Great Plains, it is imperative policymakers implement freshwater projects along the lower Colorado River, in particular, the Salton Sea, a 376-square-mile freshwater agricultural sump in southeastern California, and in the Colorado River Delta where the waterway ends its journey in the Baja California desert.…

Using Science to Empower Communities and Improve Marine Protected Areas in East Africa

By Jennifer O’Leary and Arthur Tuda When you think about East Africa, probably the first images that emerge are of large terrestrial animals like elephants and lions. Many people don’t know that East Africa has vibrant marine fishing communities and hundreds of miles of coral reefs. In a typical morning, you watch the sun rise…

Organ Donations Save Many Lives

More than 120,000 Americans are on waiting lists to receive organs that could extend their lives. Many, if not most, will be disappointed, because hearts, lungs, kidneys, livers and other body parts will not become available for them. Peta Cappello, a 59-year-old entrepreneur from Maryland, has lived with transplanted heart and lungs for nearly 21 years. As a “Donate Life Ambassador” for Washington Regional Transplant Community, a group that advocates for organ donation in the U.S. national capital area, she writes here of her experience and the gift of a productive and joyful life she received from her donor.

Springs: The Canary in a Coal Mine for Groundwater

From Abe Springer: Humans have relied on springs for millennia. Since the beginning of human evolution, populations spanning all seven continents have built entire communities around these sources of water, because they are dependable, plentiful and not as subject to the changes of climate and stream flow.

Manx: How a Unique Island Got Its Voice Back

Celebrate the successful revival of the Isle of Man’s ancient tongue as UNESCO marks International Mother Language Day.

ESSAY: Human Females Could (Should?) Be More Like Elephant Females

From Katarzyna Nowak, Lauren McCall, and Isabel Behncke Izquierdo: What unique skills do women hold for the future of our species and the ecosystems we have come to dominate? What can we learn from elephants as human societies become more out of balance with nature?

A Bold Vision to Protect our Oceans Permanently

The oceans need our help. Human impacts – overfishing, pollution, invasive species, habitat destruction, acidification and climate change – have put our ocean species on the cusp of mass extinctions today. Scientists predict the collapse of major fisheries across the world within the next decades. We need to realize that fish are more than just food. Fish are wildlife, as well as critical components of complex marine ecosystems and food webs that must be maintained. We urgently need a network of marine protected areas (MPAs) to help sustain the oceans that in turn sustain all of us.

Shrimp Fisheries Improving in Gulf of Mexico, Thanks In Part to Seafood Suppliers

By Megan Westmeyer Fishery improvement projects (FIPs) are based on the premise that the seafood industry itself is the strongest force for driving improvements in fisheries, and a group of shrimp suppliers from the Gulf of Mexico has shown us how it’s done. Cox’s Wholesale Seafood, Katie’s Seafood Market, National Fish and Seafood, and Philly…

Watch Wild Elephant Awaken After Being Saved From Poison Arrow

As we were leaving the scene in the helicopter, the elephant got to his feet and turned to face us, lifting his trunk as if to say, “Go away and stop bothering me!” Or maybe, ” Thank you.”

OPINION: The Facts about Cruise Lines’ Environmental Stewardship

Although cruise lines represent only a tiny fraction of all vessels that traverse the seas, they are leaders in the maritime community in developing innovative technologies and best practices to preserve and protect oceans.

OPINION: Slick “Hunter Proud” Video Uses Bad Ecology to Promote Elephant Culling, Trophy Hunting, and Ivory Trading

By Phyllis Lee, Keith Lindsay, and Katarzyna Nowak

The Elephant and the Pauper: The Ivory Debacle is a recently released 50-minute video by the Hunter Proud Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable public foundation and lobbying organization based in Houston, Texas.

The video was circulated in the first half of January 2015 to members of the IUCN Specialist Groups and to CITES membership, with the specific aim of lobbying for hunting and consumptive use of African wildlife.

The film—whose proposals for gaining revenue from ivory and sport hunting come at a time of unprecedented poaching and killing of elephants across their range, including in Zimbabwe—is risky to the point of irresponsibility.

ESSAY: Infighting Over Whether to Trade in Elephant Ivory and Rhino Horn Jeopardizes Both Species

From Michael Schwartz: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Isaac Newton’s third law of motion is certainly an adequate illustration of the ongoing pugilism between pro-trade and anti-trade advocacy groups concerning the battle to protect remaining elephant and rhinoceros populations in Africa.

China’s Illegal Ivory Trade Escalating Out of Control

The illegal ivory trade is exploding in China, overwhelming efforts to enforce the law, according to the results of the first detailed research on the markets of Beijing and Shanghai since 2002.

Big Cat Selfies for #GivingTuesday

This Giving Tuesday, get inspired by some selfies taken by lions in the wild, then support NG’s Big Cats Initiative and help spread the word by tagging @CauseanUproar in your own #UNselfie!

Something to be Thankful for: Growing Cranberries Sustainably

By Brian Milne It’s Saturday morning in Plympton, Mass., and the sun has yet to dry the dew from the windows at the Mayflower Cranberries farm, but owner Jeff LaFleur is already on a knee in his bog inspecting his crimson bounty in preparation for the fall harvest. “It’s a pretty big berry, as you…