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Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Statement on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Decision to Not Grant Easement

After months of protest and asking for their concerns over water safety, cultural preservation, and historic treaty rights to be heard, the Standing Rock Sioux are celebrating the U.S. Army’s decision not to grant the current easement to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Explorers and Students Team Up to Start the Year Off With a ROAR

Sharing firsthand experiences and lessons from the field, National Geographic Big Cats Initiative explorers are helping spread their boundless knowledge and affection for the wild to the next generation.

Dreams and Reality in la Habana

Growing up in a Cuban-American family, Mario Machado had the incredible fortune of absorbing a near-mythical image of the island that his grandfather had left as a boy in 1946. Now he’s writing his own chapter in the story.

Understanding the Mystery of the World’s Largest Mammal Migration

What does it feel like to be surrounded by 8-10 million bats? There is only one spot on earth where you can have this experience and explore the mystery surrounding this congregation.

A Tribute to Tenebo the Elephant

By Gini Cowell Somewhere on the African continent one elephant falls victim to poaching every 15 minutes. Almost one-hundred elephants are poisoned, speared, or shot for the tusks they carry every day. These are statistics and headlines, but the truth of the matter is that each one of the elephants slain and horrifically butchered were…

What Are Indians Eating on Thanksgiving?

So, what is eaten in India while Americans chow down on turkey?

New Zealand’s Dirty Ivory Trade Exposed

It’s clear that demand for ivory in New Zealand remains high. It’s the same kind of demand that drives the current elephant poaching crisis in Africa.

Standing Rock Sioux Invited to Work With Army on Solution for Pipeline Conflict

[The following text is from an official press release by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.] Statement Regarding the Dakota Access Pipeline Posted 11/14/2016 Release no. 16-027 Contact Moira Kelley (DOA), 703-614-3992, moira.l.kelley.civ@mail.mil Jessica Kershaw (DOI), interior_press@ios.doi.gov Washington, D.C. – Today, the Army informed the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Energy Transfer Partners, and Dakota Access, LLC, that it has completed…

A Tale of Two Countries: Zimbabwe and Botswana, Neighbors with Opposing Attitudes toward Wildlife

By Masha Kalinina, International Trade Policy Specialist, Humane Society International On a recent tour into Zimbabwe’s Matobo National Park – where white and black rhinos are being reintroduced – our group noticed that the horn of a white rhino we spotted was removed. I asked our guide why. “To deter poachers,” he replied. Knowing that…

Protecting the Sacred Rooftop of the World

Climate change, development and water diversions threaten Himalayan communities and way of life

By Cheryl Nenn

Flying into Leh, the former capital of the Himalayan kingdom of Ladakh, feels more like landing on the moon than landing in India. Its harsh, mountainous terrain is starkly beautiful and very dry, due to its high altitude and cold desert climate. We were sent to Ladakh on behalf of Waterkeeper Alliance, an international organization dedicated to clean water and healthy communities, to train our new Himalayan Glacier Waterkeeper and 20 affiliates, most of whom are Buddhist monks, how to test water quality and be effective water advocates.

Could Climate Change Keep Kids Out of School?

By Lisa Palmer

Education is seen as a key tool for building resilience to climate change in the developing world. But new research shows that climate change could also make it harder to keep kids in school and ensure they get the best out of their time in the classroom.

Heather Randell, a postdoctoral fellow at the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center, a research institute funded by the National Science Foundation and the University of Maryland, studies the relationships between environmental change, development, and human health and wellbeing. Her research focuses on the social processes underlying migration, the links between development and rural livelihoods, and the social and health impacts of environmental change.

“Unstoppable” Destabilization of West Antarctic Ice Sheet: Threshold May Have Been Crossed

By Brenda Ekwurzel, Senior Climate Scientist, Union of Concerned Scientists

Losing all the ice shelves of Antarctica would be like losing each flying buttress that supported a gothic building. Collapse is the inevitable result. The question is how fast is the collapse in the case of an ice sheet that would, as Richard Alley told Congress in February 2007, slowly spread outwards and flatten like pancake batter that was just plopped on a griddle.

Nearly a decade later, the latest science indicates a critical threshold may have already been crossed.

Millennials Catch the Wave

By Daniela Fernandez Founder & Chair Sustainable Oceans Alliance                                              Two years ago, I founded the Sustainable Oceans Alliance (S0A), a student-led organization that empowers millennials to become leaders in preserving the health and sustainability of our ocean. My passion to create SOA stemmed from the lack of engagement opportunities that…

Giving a Platform to the Tribal Guardians of the Natural World

Survival’s Lewis Evans talks to Sarah Shenker reports on her visit to a small group of Guajajara Indians in Brazil who are fighting to protect the forest and an uncontacted tribe from loggers. “With support from Survival, the Guajajara are able to expose illegal logging and threats to their uncontacted neighbors in real time.” © Survival…

Can Vertical Farming Sustain Food Demands in the Wake of Climate Change?

By Robert Colangelo According to a 2015 report by the United Nations, the world’s population is expected to reach 9.7 billion by the year 2050. While those numbers are set to increase, so are rising surface temperatures and worsening droughts caused by severe weather patterns. Changes in climate are already reducing the amount of arable…