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A Refuge Found for the Most Heavily Fished Shark?

We are seeing only large females and very small juveniles, suggesting that the waters of Tristan da Cunha might be a blue shark nursery ground with large females traveling here to give birth.

Video Tribute Marks 40th Anniversary of Sheldrick Elephant Haven

Nicky Campbell is a journalist, broadcaster and wildlife campaigner. He and the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust have released the “Sacred Eyes” music video to mark the 40th anniversary of the Trust’s Orphans Project, which has saved hundreds of juvenile elephants left stranded by the slaughter of their mothers for ivory.

Old Water and New Knowledge at Cienega Creek

“How old is your water?” That’s not a common question among water users, or even in water education, yet it’s high on the list for Dr. Jennifer McIntosh. She’s an Associate Professor in Hydrology & Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Arizona whose focus is the elemental and isotopic chemistry of water. For her, estimating the age of water can be a key tool in understanding the structure and functioning of aquifers.

Intriguing Burials, Artifacts Unearthed at Ancient Egyptian/Nubian Site

Our investigations into understanding life and death for the elite individuals buried in the Tombos pyramid/chapel structures at Tombos have been very successful this season.

Young Traditional Navigators Aim for One of the Most Isolated Islands on Earth

“The leg to Rapa Nui presents a unique learning opportunity for the young navigators to test their wayfinding abilities and refine the skills needed to navigate aboard Hokulea,” said Pwo navigator and captain Nainoa Thompson. “Even if you’re extraordinarily precise, you could still miss it. And so it is one of the ultimate navigational challenges of all time.”

Big Cat Week Spirit Comes to a Big Apple School

Happy Big Cat Week! In the spirit of celebration, Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert just paid a special visit to students at P.S. 205 the Fiorello Laguardia School, a National Geographic Big Cats Initiative Sister School in the Bronx.

A Ray of Hope for Lions

Simply by creating the right conditions for existing protected areas in Africa, we could yield a massive recovery in lions, and a host of other wildlife species.

As Lawmakers Debate Fate of Wolves, Film Commands Renewed Attention

Posted by Nicola Payne

Congressional bills aiming to strip protections for the North American gray wolf could push the species toward extinction. Speaking from her home in California, Julia Huffman, director of the award-winning 2015 documentary Medicine of the Wolf, explains the politics behind the War on Wolves Act, the role of wolves throughout human history, and how the esteem our ancestors once held for these creatures seems to be missing in us today.

On #worldwetlandsday, Stakeholders Form Alliance to Conserve Wetland Forests of the U.S. South

On World Wetlands Day (February 2, 2017), a diverse group of stakeholders have joined together to announce a major multi-state effort to conserve one of America’s most precious natural resources, wetland forests of the South.

Chimps in Danger – Time to Turn The Tide

By Will Travers, Born Free Foundation

We’ve done pretty much everything to chimpanzees.

We’ve shot them into space, used them to sell tea, smuggled their babies as exotic ‘pets’, dressed them up as clowns in the circus, experimented on them for dubious medical research – even, in some parts of the world, eaten them.

And yet we have failed to do the one thing that really matters – we have failed to protect them and their natural forest home.

Visiting the Magical Mountain Home of a Giant Ocean Wanderer

For years I’ve dreamed of visiting “Gonydale,” a remote valley reached after a three-hour trek across rivers, beneath towering pinnacle cliffs and through thick lush ferns. It is a lost world and home to some of the last of the Tristan albatross.

The Plight of Urban Wildlife

By Lila Brooks, Author of “The Chronicle of a Coyote Defender”

Animals are companions in the biosphere and part of the “web of life.” They are our fellow planetarians, destined to SHARE this planet with us humans and are not to be used or exploited for any reason.

EleWatch, a Sustainable Way for Humans to Co-exist With Elephants

With the escalating decline of elephants over the last decade, in 2015, the NGOs Des Eléphants & des Hommes, supported by Awely, wildlife and people, and IFAW France (International Fund for Animal Welfare) launched the Elephant-Watching initiative or EleWatch. The mission of EleWatch is to promote the economic and non-economic (ecological, cultural, patrimonial, social, and aesthetic) value of elephants and their natural habitats through development of national and international ecotourism programs across their entire geographic range.

South Africa’s Lion Bone Trade Disastrous for Wild Tigers

Posted by Environmental Investigation Agency

EIA is appalled that South Africa intends to export the skeletons of 800 African lions a year into a trade that stimulates consumer demand for the bones of more endangered big cats.

The Deep History of California’s Catastrophic Flooding

By Josh Chamot, Nexus Media News: Torrential rains are drenching California, flooding streets across the state. Is this normal? UC Berkeley geologist B. Lynn Ingram says that California faces megafloods about once every 200 years, but with climate change will make dangerous floods more frequent. Ingram explained how it works. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.