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International League of Conservation Photographers

www.ConservationPhotographers.org

The mission of the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) is to further environmental and cultural conservation through photography. iLCP is a Fellowship of more than 100 photographers from all around the globe.

As a project based organization, iLCP coordinates Conservation Photography Expeditions to get world-renowned photographers in the field teamed with scientists, writers, videographers and conservation groups to gather visual assets that are used to create conservation communications campaigns to foment conservation successes.

iLCP is a 501 (c) (3) organization. Learn more about our conservation projects at ilcp.com/projects.

Diggers in the Dark: Discovering Giant Armadillos in Brazil’s Pantanal

Text and Photographs by Kevin Schafer, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers It is an axiom of conservation that to protect a species, we need to know something about it. Although it is tempting, in this age of global data, to believe that we know all there is to know about the animals…

Saving Goat Islands, Jamaica

Text and photos by Robin Moore, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers Guardian of the Reptiles “You’ve got to respect another life, so that the other life can respect yours,” says Booms, whose real name is Mr. Kenroy Williams, a young Jamaican who has devoted the past seven years of his life to protecting…

Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

Conflict Coast: Mozambique’s Primeiras E Segundas Archipelago

Photos by iLCP Fellow James Morgan Originally commissioned by WWF Words by Cara Jessop. Empty-handed, fisherman Fome Ali Buri gestures out to sea with the words “It’s over. The ocean is finished. When we fish, all we catch is sand.” Outwardly, Mozambique is a booming and prosperous country, one of the world’s fastest growing economies…

On the Trail of the Pygmy Raccoon

by Kevin Schafer / iLCP No, this is not your average raccoon.  And that, precisely, is the point of this story.  For one of the world’s most endangered carnivores has had the misfortune of looking like a common neighborhood pest – the raccoon. But the Pygmy Raccoon of Mexico’s Cozumel Island is not at all…

Photographing the End of the Kreef

Text and photographs by International League of Conservation Photographers Fellow Cheryl-Samantha Owen www.samowenphotography.com “It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” At 4:35 in the morning the faint glow of dawn backlit the…

Over 4,000 Reasons to Love (and Protect) North America’s Native Bees

By Clay Bolt, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers It has been famously said that it is impossible to avoid thinking of a pink elephant once you’ve been told, “Don’t think of a pink elephant!”  Naturally, I’m thinking of one right now; a large, cotton candy colored pachyderm with robust thighs and…

The Wild Clearwater

By Krista Schlyer, Senior Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers, iLCP A smoky haze permeates the air above Idaho’s Bitterroot Mountains, obscuring the view from Chris Boyer’s Cessna 170 airplane. Wildfires have been raging for months in the region, the new normal in the global-warming-era world of the western United States. But the…

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…

Healing Okinoshima Island – Restoring a sacred Japanese landscape overrun by rats is no mean feat.

By Andrew S. Wright, iLCP Aperture Circle Photographer Naked, chilled and immersed in the sea of Genkai, I have little more than my stiff-upper-lip British heritage to conceal my modesty. Seven not-so-young male biologists from four different countries and several conservation organizations are with me on the island of Okinoshima, participating in a Shinto ocean…

Where Are The Predators of the Gambier Islands?

By Michele Westmorland, Photographer and iLCP Founding Fellow In Part 1 of this blog I wrote about the need for accurate science and compelling outreach images if we are to move the needle on ocean conservation, but I never wrote about what it takes on the ground to complete such a task. I thought I…

Using Conservation Photography and Science to Save French Polynesia’s Coral Reefs

Time and time again, environmental groups looking to protect a certain corner of our globe have failed in the long run because of lack of support from the local communities. If the people who live near and are dependent on a reef ecosystem for their livelihoods fail to nurture it, no amount of outside intervention is going to make a difference.

iLCP Photo Expedition to Document Cradle of Marine Biodiversity

“Long term and meaningful conservation success really is only possible if NGOs and photographers work together – very often also working with scientists. If you can get those three sectors working together, you’re pretty much a non-stoppable force.” Thomas Peschak, Conservation Photographer and iLCP Fellow The International League of Conservation Photographers has pulled together an…

Honduran President Burns Shark Fins, Reinforces Marine Sanctuary

With the Honduran declaration of its entire maritime waters as a shark sanctuary, the President provides legal protection to sharks.

Cute – but endangered – The Lions of Gir

After having spent an amazing time in the vicinity of this incredible animal, I only hope that the right people will change their mind and give these lions a chance, so that we once again can see them roam freely as they should – Uri Golman