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International League of Conservation Photographers

www.ConservationPhotographers.org

The mission of the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) is to further environmental and cultural conservation through photography. iLCP is a Fellowship of more than 100 photographers from all around the globe.

As a project based organization, iLCP coordinates Conservation Photography Expeditions to get world-renowned photographers in the field teamed with scientists, writers, videographers and conservation groups to gather visual assets that are used to create conservation communications campaigns to foment conservation successes.

iLCP is a 501 (c) (3) organization. Learn more about our conservation projects at ilcp.com/projects.

Wilderness: As it Was in the Beginning

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and Photography by iLCP Fellow Krista Schlyer September 3rd, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of The Wilderness Act–Americans will be…

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

Poaching Crisis in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photo from iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton. UPDATE FROM THE FIELD: Paul Hilton and FKL Rangers Expose Wildlife Poaching in…

Absaroka-Beartooth Front: Yellowstone’s wild front porch

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text By Jeff Welsch Photos by Dave Showalter, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). High on the rugged…

Healthy Seas and Healthy Communities: The People of Honduras’ Mesoamerican Reef

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP) and features the work of our Fellows on iLCP projects and expeditions.  Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by iLCP Fellow Karen…

Cowboys and Indians Stand Together Against Keystone XL.

Text by Kristin Moe, photos by Garth Lenz, for the International League of Conservation Photographers. On April 22, 2014, the dozen or so leather-booted ranchers mounted their horses and lined up in the midday sun. Facing them were an equal number of American Indians, in the regalia of tribes from across the U.S. The two groups…

Diggers in the Dark: Discovering Giant Armadillos in Brazil’s Pantanal

Text and Photographs by Kevin Schafer, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers It is an axiom of conservation that to protect a species, we need to know something about it. Although it is tempting, in this age of global data, to believe that we know all there is to know about the animals…

Saving Goat Islands, Jamaica

Text and photos by Robin Moore, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers Guardian of the Reptiles “You’ve got to respect another life, so that the other life can respect yours,” says Booms, whose real name is Mr. Kenroy Williams, a young Jamaican who has devoted the past seven years of his life to protecting…

Headhunt Revisited

Text and Photos by iLCP Fellow Michele Westmorland, Headhunt Revisited project. In 1926, painter Caroline Mytinger and her friend, Margaret Warner, set out from San Francisco for a four-year adventure in the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. With little more than $400, a few art supplies, and a trunk of clothing, they made their…

Conflict Coast: Mozambique’s Primeiras E Segundas Archipelago

Conservation photographer and iLCP Fellow, James Morgan, documents the economic realities of local fisherman, in an outwardly booming and prosperous Mozambique. One of the world’s fastest growing economies, with Scandinavia, Brazil, China and the U.S. among its foreign investors–thanks to enormous untapped oil and gas reserves in the north of the country–over half of Mozambique’s population remains in absolute poverty, surviving on less than a dollar a day. To feed and clothe their families, coastal Mozambicans are finding that they must combine livelihoods, with the majority both fishing and working the land to eke out a living. Words by Cara Jessop.

On the Trail of the Pygmy Raccoon

No, this is not your average raccoon. And that, precisely, is the point of this story, captured by iLCP Fellow, Kevin Schafer. For one of the world’s most endangered carnivores has had the misfortune of looking like a common neighborhood pest – the raccoon. But the Pygmy Raccoon of Mexico’s Cozumel Island is not at all the same. Although it shares the familiar face mask of its North American cousin, the Pygmy Raccoon is roughly half the size, has shorter fur, and a handsome reddish tail. The other major difference? There may be no more than 300 of them left on Earth.

Photographing the End of the Kreef

“It is currently estimated that numbers of rock lobster on the West Coast of South Africa are perilously low, at only three percent of their original pre-exploitation or pristine levels.” Conservation photographer and iLCP Fellow, Cheryl-Samantha Owen shares truths about how over-fishing and poaching has damaged the stock of these invaluable crustaceans. However, their demise, is not irreversible. Last year the Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI) downgraded the rock lobster’s status from green (go ahead – best choice) to orange (think twice about buying this species please).

Over 4,000 Reasons to Love (and Protect) North America’s Native Bees

This is part one of a year-long series of articles by iLCP Fellow, Clay Bolt, focused on documenting the lives and highlighting the importance of preserving native North American bumble bees. There are over 4,000 known species of native North American bees whose pollination services are worth an estimated $3 billion dollars per year to the US economy. Beyond this impressive dollar amount, many agricultural plants are primarily pollinated by native bees that are uniquely equipped with the tools and techniques required to do the job. While we’re (justifiably) spending heaps of time focusing on the loss of honey bees here in North America, our native bees are in decline as well, but in general, the media has overlooked this important fact.

The Wild Clearwater

By Krista Schlyer, Senior Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers, iLCP A smoky haze permeates the air above Idaho’s Bitterroot Mountains, obscuring the view from Chris Boyer’s Cessna 170 airplane. Wildfires have been raging for months in the region, the new normal in the global-warming-era world of the western United States. But the…

What’s a Danajon Bank?

by Michael Ready, Associate Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers In April 2013, after four planes, a ferry, and two outriggers, I arrived at Handumon, a remote village and field station on Jandayan Island in the Philippines. As I lay down the first night under a mosquito net, wiped out and bit disoriented,…