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Julia Harte is a freelance journalist based in Istanbul, where she focuses on social and environmental justice issues. In 2013, she received a National Geographic Young Explorer grant to travel along the Tigris River from Southern Iraq to Southeastern Turkey, documenting the downstream and upstream impacts of Turkey's Ilısu Dam for a project entitled, "After the Dam, the Deluge: A Final Glimpse at the Ancient Town of Hasankeyf and Traditional Life Along the Tigris".

Julia's work has previously appeared in Reuters, Foreign Policy, The World Policy Journal, Global Post, TimeOut Istanbul, the Philadelphia City Paper, and Cultural Survival Quarterly.

What Will Happen to Turkish Villagers in the Path of a Giant Dam?

The final dispatch from NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek examines the lives of villagers who have already been displaced by hydroelectric dams in Southeastern Turkey — and what they portend for residents of the 12,000-year-old town of Hasankeyf, soon to be submerged by the Ilısu Dam.

Rare Footage of Ilısu: The Dam That Will Flood Homes and History Across Southern Turkey

NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek visit the construction site of the Ilısu Dam, a 1,200 MW hydroelectric dam whose reservoir will displace at least 25,000 people and flood hundreds of archeological sites across Southeastern Turkey.

Turkish Town Has Hosted 12,000 Years of Human History & Stunning Biodiversity

Almost nowhere in the world is human history as densely layered as it is in Hasankeyf. Strange sights greet its visitors: thousands of caves carved into limestone cliffs, children playing on the remains of a gargantuan medieval bridge, the towering minaret of a 15th-century mosque. Explore the ancient Turkish town with NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek.

Meet Some of the Rare Cultures Sustained by Iraqi Kurdistan’s Rivers

NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek interview members of Iraqi Kurdistan’s Yazidi, Mandean, and Armenian populations about their relationship with the rivers that traverse northern Iraq — and their fears about future water security.

Will Shrinking Rivers Force Kurdistan’s Nomads to Abandon Their Lifestyle?

Kurdish and Arabic nomads, a dwindling population in Iraqi Kurdistan, may be forced to move to cities if river levels in the region continue to decline. NG Young Explorer Julia Harte and team member Anna Ozbek report on the situation through text, photos, and video.

Two Views of the Tigris: A Syrian and an Iraqi Kurd Discuss Turkey’s Dams

Near the point where Turkey, Iraq, and Syria meet, two villages face each other across the Tigris River. On one side lies the Iraqi Kurdish village of Faysh Khabur, home to a Chaldean Christian community for more than fourteen centuries. On the other bank sits Khanik Village, another ancient Chaldean community — but one that lies in Syria.

8,000 Years After its Advent, Agriculture is Withering in Southern Iraq

As temperatures in Southern Iraq approached 52 degrees Celsius (126°F) last July, Habib Salman, a 52-year-old farmer in the Al-Islah township, shot himself in the head, leaving behind an eleven-member family. The stream on which their farm relied had recently dried up, jeopardizing his family’s survival.

In Cradle of Civilization, Shrinking Rivers Endanger Unique Marsh Arab Culture

NG Young Explorer Julia Harte documents the culture of the Marsh Arabs of Southern Iraq through text and photos, as well as a video shot and edited by team member Anna Ozbek.

Enki’s Gift: How Civilization Bubbled From the Waters of Mesopotamia

NG Young Explorer Julia Harte examines the historical importance of water in Mesopotamia’s cultures and religions through text and photos, as well as a video shot and edited by team member Anna Ozbek.

Drought and Dams in Biblical Garden of Eden

NG Young Explorer Julia Harte begins her expedition northward along the Tigris River, where she will examine the impacts of Turkey’s Ilısu Dam, with initial glimpses at water issues in Southern Iraq and an introduction to the heated controversy surround the dam.