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Youth Radio Investigates

Youth Radio Investigates is an NSF-supported science reporting series in which young journalists collect and analyze original data with professional scientists, and then tell unexpected stories about what they discover. National Geographic News Watch partners with Youth Radio to share the work of the young journalists with the National Geographic audience. Check out more from Youth Radio’s science desk at http://www.youthradio.org/oldsite/nsf/index.shtml

The Darker Side of Black Licorice

Want to test your own knowledge of which candies have tested positive for lead? Check out the “Trick or Treat” app from the team at Youth Radio Interactive.  This Halloween, kids everywhere will be out trick or treating for candy. And while some might worry about the loot rotting our teeth, there’s another more potent risk. Traces…

7 Weird Ways to Save Water

By Scott Lau Whether it’s in response to California’s recent drought, or just to be economical, here are seven weird ways young people, like me and my peers, are saving water today. Dirty clothes? Wash your laundry in large loads. Collect the grey water in a bucket And use the soapy water to mop up…

Alternate Reality Game Eavesdrops On Climate Changed Future

By Darrell Owens The year is 20XX: Dallas is covered in 30 inches of snow, San Francisco is experiencing mild tornadoes, and Greenland has become a tropical paradise. At least, this is what inhabitants of possible futures are saying in the new alternate reality game, Future Coast. Future Coast is the brainchild of game designer…

Youth Radio’s Lipstick Diaries: The Ugly Side of Beauty

By Joi Morgan One thing I know for sure, my friends and I count on the perfect lip gloss to set off our looks—whether we’re heading to class or a night out. Right now I’m totally into bubblegum pink. But I was surprised to learn what’s in these tubes! Teenage girls spend nearly $14 a…

Do Vape Pens Trick Teens?

By Jenny Bolario Vape pens, or e-cigarettes, are often billed as a safer way for smokers to get their fix. The user breathes in water vapor infused with nicotine and exhales what looks like smoke. But with flavors like banana cream pie and alien blood, these pens are attracting a new generation of “smokers.” According…

Community Activism Through Mapping

By: Sunday Simon Say there’s an issue in your community you want to fix. There are the obvious tactics. Maybe you try picketing, talking to your local government, or collecting signatures from your neighbors. But have you ever thought of mapping your issue? That’s what four students at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles did…

Pixar Producer Discusses Technology Behind Movie Animation

By: Bianca Brooks Insurance. That’s the field Oscar-nominated Pixar animator and visual effects director Andrew Jimenez credits for helping to make him the animator he is today. After studying film in college, he got an unglamorous insurance job, and that’s where he learned tools like Photoshop, which gave him the grounding he needed as an…

Brains and Beakers: Secrets Of Science Reporting

By Kendrick Calkins Alexis Madrigal has been called “the perfect modern reporter.” He’s written for The New York Times, Wired, and is now a senior editor of the Atlantic magazine, where he runs their technology section. He recently joined us at, Brains and Beakers, Youth Radio’s regular gathering where we hear from some of the biggest scientific thinkers, right…

The Science of Hypnosis

By: Chantell Williams Listen to Youth Radio’s investigation: The Science of Hypnosis Hypnosis has been around for centuries. It’s been shown to reduce stress, anxiety and pain. Yet the practice is still struggling for mainstream public acceptance. New research from Stanford University is applying the latest medical imaging tools to figure out the science behind…

Brains and Beakers: Raps on Science

By Chantell Williams A couple years ago I wrote a song about geography to the tune of Katy Perry’s Teenage Dream. I still remember every single word of that song… too embarrassing to actually write here, but it helped me pass my test. Music can help with learning and memory and can be used as…

Teen Genius Develops Cancer Test

By Donisha Dansby Jack Andraka is not your ordinary teenager. Instead of hanging out with friends or watching TV, Andraka prefers working in a lab, looking for a new way to detect cancer. The crazy thing is, he actually did! At just 16 Andraka has created a new tool to detect pancreatic cancer in its…

How Long Until a Drone of Your Own?

By Donta Jackson I met my first drone playing Call Of Duty: Black Ops. In the game, you can control one of these unmanned flying vehicles to hover and fire missiles to destroy enemy territory. In real life we also associate drones with death from above. The news constantly reminds us of their destructive power,…

Brains and Beakers: Gamifying Air Pollution

By Kayla Garrett Could video games save the environment? Maybe with the kind Greg Niemeyer is trying to build. Niemeyer specializes in digital art, and his most recent work focuses on games that seek and support cultural change. He’s an assistant professor for new media at UC Berkeley, and presented at the last Brains and…

The Science Behind Speaker-Making

By Ashley Williams Are you trying to get new speakers in your car but they’re too expensive? Have you ever considered making your own? It’s easy, and the price is right. For Youth Radio’s latest installment in our science series, Brains and Beakers(or should I say Brains and Speakers?), the Explainers from the Exploratorium came…

Lessons from a Little Yellow Submarine

On a foggy night, a little yellow submarine is docked in Monterey Bay. The research submersible is about to introduce a group of young people to a whole new world and possibly a new line of work.  Youth Radio’s Denise Tejada went along for the ride.   Chris Randolph and Bailey Da Costa are juniors…