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Miguel Vilar

www.genographic.com

Dr. Miguel Vilar is the Science Manager for National Geographic's Genographic Project. Miguel is also a molecular anthropologist and a science writer. His fieldwork has taken him to remote places throughout the South Pacific, East Africa, Mesoamerica, and the Caribbean. In the laboratory he researches the modern genetic diversity of human populations from Melanesia, Micronesia, North and Central America, and the Caribbean. Miguel has published in several anthropology and genetics journals, as well as popular science magazines.

DNA Reveals Unknown Ancient Migration Into India

As the Genographic Project celebrates its 10th anniversary, team scientists announce intriguing results from a study of more than 10,000 men from southern Asia.

The Genographic Project Turns Ten

    Ten years ago, National Geographic and IBM teamed up with a group of international scientists and indigenous community members at National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. to kick off the Genographic Project. Our plan: To use advanced DNA analyses to answer fundamental scientific questions, such as where we originated from, and how…

Preserving Traditional Forest Medicine for Future Generations

A recent NG Genographic Legacy Fund project is preserving generations of stories and information associated with medicine in Madagascar.

Using Ancient DNA to Uncover the Hidden History of Patagonia

How far will Genographic Project scientists go to help reveal where we came from? Geographically-speaking the answer may be Puerto Williams, the southern tip of Chile.

Baka Community Creates a Mobile Pre-School in Cameroon’s Forests

The Baka people of Southeastern Cameroon grow up surrounded by nature, and from a young age develop incredible skills for living in a largely wild environment. With a new preschool, they’re also able to develop the skills to interact successfully with the wider world.

Genographic Project Participants Help Refine Human Family Tree

The Genographic Project recently released the most refined evolutionary tree of the human Y chromosome, which every male inherits directly from his father. The new Y tree was created in part through the help of the 300,000 male participants that have joined this one-of-a-kind project to trace their own ancestry and become citizen scientists. As more…

A Talk Over Tea: Preserving India’s Indigenous Languages

Tea is a ubiquitous part of modern life, but what do we know about the people who make it all possible? Meet the Adivasi people of Assam, India, tea laborers struggling to preserve their culture.

Hmong Use Tech to Keep Old Traditions Alive

Hmong communities in Vietnam use modern technology to preserve their ancient arts, crafts, and oral history. See photos and learn more about their traditions.

DNA Results from Asturias, Spain Add to the Genographic Project Human Family Tree

Genetic results from Asturias, Spain, or Espana Verde (Green Spain), go deeper than the delightful cidre and fabada asturiana. From low hominin ancestry to high numbers of unique European lineages, the Genographic Project sheds new light on the history of Espana Verde.  by Rachel Bruton Last year, the Niemeyer Center of Aviles (Asturias) invited the…

Genographic Project Research in India Looks to Add Deep Branches to Our Human Family Tree

The path along India’s coast is thought to be the original human migratory route from Africa. Today India is home to many distinct languages and cultures. Genographic research extends to the Jammu and Kashmir state where present day and ancient history combine. Genographic Project grantee Dr. Swarkar Sharma wants to share a story – the…

The Genographic Project unveils the ancient ancestry of New Zealand, the world’s last settled islands

The Genographic Project results are in from 100 Kiwis (or New Zealanders). The results were revealed to an excited crowd of participants, which included New Zealand’s own Governor General Sir Jerry Mateparae. Background Earlier this year, a team from National Geographic’s Genographic Project was invited by the Allan Wilson Centre to North Island, New Zealand to shed…

Is Genetic Genealogy the Next Facebook of Science?

While millions of people spent last weekend dumping buckets of ice water on their heads and documenting it on Facebook to raise money and awareness for ALS, a few us genetics geeks gathered and talked about haplogroups*  A, L and S, among others. *Never heard of a haplogroup? Don’t worry, it’s not because you have…

Genographic Project DNA Results Reveal Details of Puerto Rican History

DNA analysis of living inhabitants of Puerto Rico sheds light on the island’s colonial history.

Ancient DNA From Teenage Girl Shows Link Between Ancient and Modern Americans

Deep in the flooded underground caves of Hoyo Negro in Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula a team of archaeologists recently unearthed a treasure trove of prehistoric remains that included the oldest human skeleton found to date in the Americas.  Falling to her death, the nearly intact skeleton is that of a teenage girl affectionately nicknamed Naia. She…

The Human Family Tree Grows New Branches on Arbor and DNA Day

The Genographic Project, in partnership with Family Tree DNA, announces a new evolutionary tree. Did you know that this year, April 25th is both DNA Day and Arbor Day? In order to join in on the festivities and mark this calendric coincidence, National Geographic’s Genographic Project and Family Tree DNA are announcing the joint creation…