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Sharon’s work as a journalist and photographer has taken her from the remote heart of Eastern Siberia (where grizzlies still thrive) and India's Kaziranga National Park (a haven for Bengal tigers), to Turkey’s Eastern Anatolian villages, by boat to isolated river towns along Myanmar’s Irrawaddy River and cross country across Cuba--with plenty of time scuba diving in various oceans and exploring African savannas and Latin American jungles.

Her new book, "Tigers Forever: Saving the World's Most Endangered Big Cat" is a collaboration with National Geographic photographer Steve Winter, published by National Geographic Books. She also launched the "State of the Wild: A Global Portrait of Wildlife, Wildlands and Oceans" book series for the Wildlife Conservation Society, published by Island Press.

She has co-produced short videos for National Geographic, including "Battling India's Illegal Tiger Trade."

Weaving storytelling with cultural, historical, and scientific information, Sharon also crafts features, essays, blogs and commentary for national and international media. Areas of special interest include wildlife conservation, climate change and other environmental and environmental health issues--and big cats.

Her articles and commentary have appeared in The New York Times, Smithsonian, Scientific American, The Boston Globe, Scientific American Mind, BBC Wildlife, USA Today, Popular Science, nationalgeographic.com, and Audubon, among other publications, and has been distributed by The New York Times Syndicate.

She lived in Turkey for a year on a Fulbright Fellowship, is a scuba diver, and worked as a photojournalist for many years before earning her Masters degree in Journalism from New York University's Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program, where she has also taught as adjunct assistant professor.

Industrial-Scale Tiger Farms: Feeding China’s Thirst for Luxury Tiger Products

Young, healthy tigers jump through rings of fire, sit upright on cue, clawing at the air, and perform other well-choreographed circus tricks. Enthusiastic crowds cheer. After the show, some pay extra to hold small, cuddly cubs. But those who visit these tiger attractions in China have no idea of the suffering behind the scenes or the dark commerce that keeps them afloat.

Tigers in Traditional Chinese Medicine: A Universal Apothecary

Talking Tigers: Part 6 of a 12-part series For centuries, tigers have inspired awe, reverence and sometimes, terror, in the humans they’ve lived beside. They command the Asian landscape as the top predator—immense, magnificent, muscular animals armed with razored claws and massive canines. They can kill with one swipe of their dinner plate-sized paws or…

Why Have Tigers Been Feared and Revered Throughout History?

Talking Tigers: Part 5 of a 12-part series Throughout human history, the diverse peoples who populated the vast Asian continent have had one thing in common: They feared and revered the tiger. Throughout this cat’s range, their stealthy, illusory habits—suddenly appearing and disappearing in dense forests, often at night—elevated them to the status of otherworldly beings.…

A Concise History of Tiger Hunting in India

In part four of a 12-part series, author Sharon Guynup explains the varied history of tiger conservation in India.

Kids in India Come Together to Save Tigers

In part three of a 12-part tiger series, Steve Winter and Sharon Guynup learn about an organization that’s encouraging kids to care about tigers and the environment.

Illegal Tiger Trade: Why Tigers Are Walking Gold

In part two of a 12-part series, Sharon Guynup and Steve Winter investigate one of the most devastating threats facing the world’s last 3,000 wild tigers: poaching.

Three Thousand Wild Tigers

Talking Tigers: Part 1 of a 12-part series  When I began intensive tiger research for our Tigers Forever book project two years back, I was shocked to learn, through a series of casual conversations, that almost no one is aware of the cat’s precarious state. When I tell people that just 3,200 tigers are left in the…

Steve Winter’s Journey to Tigers Forever

This week, wildlife photojournalist Steve Winter’s story about cougars appears in the December issue of National Geographic. He’s become the big cat guy—it’s the fourth species he’s covered for the magazine. This is a also a big week for him and me: our new book, Tigers Forever: Saving the World’s Most Endangered Big Cat, published…