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Stuart Pimm

of Nicholas School, Duke University

www.savingspecies.org

Stuart Pimm is the Doris Duke Chair of Conservation Ecology at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He is a world leader in the study of present day extinctions and what we can do to prevent them. Pimm received his BSc degree from Oxford University in 1971 and his Ph.D from New Mexico State University in 1974. Pimm is the author of nearly 300 scientific papers and four books. He is one of the most highly cited environmental scientists.
Pimm wrote the highly acclaimed assessment of the human impact to the planet: The World According to Pimm: a Scientist Audits the Earth in 2001. His commitment to the interface between science and policy has led to his testimony to both House and Senate Committees on the re-authorization of the Endangered Species Act. He has served on National Geographic’s Committee for Research and Exploration and currently works with their Big Cats Initiative. In addition to his studies in Africa, Pimm has worked in the wet forests of Colombia, Ecuador and Brazil for decades and is a long-term collaborator of the forest fragmentation project north of Manaus, Brazil.
Pimm directs SavingSpecies, a 501c3 non-profit that uses funds for carbon emissions offsets to fund local conservation groups to restore degraded lands in areas of exceptional tropical biodiversity.
His international honours include the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement (2010), the Dr. A.H. Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (2006).

Dare We Follow the Tiger’s Footsteps?

 By Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai, WildTrack Identifying individual tigers from their paw prints has been controversial.  Exciting new methods combine field work and cutting edge statistics from the software giant JMP to show how it can be done.   The majestic and enigmatic tiger – arguably our planet’s most iconic animal and the favourite subject…

Citizen Divers Enlisted in Conservation Study of Sea Turtles And Sharks at Cocos Island National Park, the “Most Beautiful Island in the World”

BY TODD STEINER   (c) Shmulik Blum, DeepSEE   Jacques Cousteau called Cocos Island “the most beautiful in the world.”  Located about halfway between Costa Rica and Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands, it is the only island in the eastern Pacific Ocean supporting tropical rainforest. With peaks as high as 2,000 feet, it is also the only one…

Historical data suggests Hawaiian sea turtle recovery is limited

Two green turtles basking.  Courtesy Mark Sully, NOAA/NMFS Hawaii Monk Seal Research Program. Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Hawaii is famous for its tranquil beaches, surfing, and for pairing pineapple with pizza. But it is Hawaii’s green sea turtles that are one of the most popular tourist draws today. Hundreds of thousands of tourists trek to…

Oil and gas development does not have to destroy the Amazon

NGS Grantee, Dr. Clinton Jenkins stands amid felled trees in Peru. Logging is a familiar threat to the Amazon, but not the only one.  When one thinks of the Amazon, it is usually of lush rainforests or indigenous people living amongst a wild landscape. Certainly, that is part of the Amazon’s story, but there is…

LION LIGHTS — a home grown solution to saving lions and livestock

Paula Kahumbu, National Geographic grantee and Buffet Prize winner, writes about an innovative solution to save lions.  It’s originator is 13 year old Richard Turere. Family portrait of lioness and her cubs, Nairobi National Park,  Stuart Pimm. Lions, once ubiquitous in Africa and Asia are now in big trouble of going extinct in the wild.…

Lions Saved from Poisoning in Tanzania’s Maasai Steppe

Warriors for Wildlife Elvis Kisimir (right) and assistant Lomoni Ndooki. Photograph by Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld Dr. Laly Lichtenfeld is a National Geographic grantee through the Big Cats Initiative. She writes from Tanzania: (PLEASE NOTE:  This post contains some graphic images.) Warriors for Wildlife are young Maasai men selected and trained by the African People and Wildlife…

Watching Wild Snow Leopards

By Darla Hillard Education Director, Snow Leopard Conservancy Photo © John Merjanian:  Wild snow leopard observed in Ladakh, northern India by members of the Wintertime Quest for the Snow Leopard Stuart writes:  After Darla posted an earlier story, I begged her to do another to include a video clip of a young snow leopard playing with…

Nepalese Teenagers become Citizen Monitors for Snow Leopard Conservation

By Darla Hillard Photo: Snow leopard captured by student-herder team in Nepal’s remote Himalaya   High in the Nepalese Himalaya, teenage students are monitoring wildlife in their community. They have made a surprising discovery. Dr. Som Ale, Regional Director with the Dr. Som Ale, Regional Director with the Snow Leopard Conservancy has been leading an effort…

Gigapanning Patagonia

To track long-term environmental changes we need to see both the wood and the trees. “click… whirrrrrrrrr….click ….. whirrrrrr ” — accompanied by an incessant wind that beats you on all sides on bad days.  These sounds begin to fill my dreams at night. Most days are bad. Sonny Bass and I stand on the…

How a toad can turn you into a prince

Do not, I repeat not, kiss frogs, toads, or anything similar. It’s after midnight. The forest is warm, damp, smells of rotting foliage, noisy with strange calls, and filled with creatures on the move. I’m with a madman. Bill Magnusson, an Australian ecologist, who has spent much of his life in the Amazon, is wearing…

The search for the grey-winged cotinga

Not all National Geographic expeditions go smoothly. All adventures end at precisely the same point. Thirty seconds into the hot shower, a stream of dirty water runs down the drain. It takes with it the mud and dried blood, changing skin color from blotchy grey to pink, uncovers the until-now forgotten scrapes and cuts, and…

This week’s claim that the species extinction crisis is overblown is a sham

Headlines in newspapers and websites blared out the headlines this week: “IPCC wrong again: species loss far less severe than feared.” (IPCC is the Nobel Prize winning international group that assesses climate change and its consequences.) “IPCC’s species extinction hype fundamental flawed” it continued. “Species extinction rates wildly overstated” went other headlines. “The International Union…

Biodiversity needs you! And your iPhone.

  Our knowledge of biodiversity is not good. We don’t know the names of most species. For the ones that we do, we don’t know where they once lived, let alone where they live now. It’s even worse for species that are rare, for they may soon not live anywhere. Now, armed with your iPhone…

India’s Latest Tiger Count Is Seriously Inadequate

The latest census of wild tigers in India, home to half the world’s wild tigers, shows that the number of big cats has increased by more than two hundred in four years. But the good news may be obscuring serious threats to the country’s iconic feline.

Finding a Home for Dracula

National Geographic scientist Stuart Pimm reports on the quest for Dracula, a particularly lovely orchid that flourishes in the cloud forests of the northern Andes of Colombia.