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Tasha Eichenseher

of National Geographic

Tasha Eichenseher is the Environment Producer and Editor for National Geographic Digital Media. She has covered water issues for a wide range of media outlets, including E/The Environment Magazine, Environmental Science & Technology online news, Greenwire, Green Guide, and National Geographic News.

Haiti’s Cycle of Calamity

Reporter William Wheeler talks with Haitians and aid workers about the fear of storms and the disastrous connection between cholera, charcoal, deforestation, and floods. By William Wheeler in Haiti This post is part of a special National Geographic news series and initiative on global water issues. Parched and dust-choked, Gonaives is the kind of town…

Americans Value Water More Than Energy, and Want Government to Fix Leaking Pipes

Ninety-five percent of Americans say water delivery is more important than access to energy sources and internet and cell phone service, according to a survey released last week by ITT, a $10.9-billion company with a $3.5-billion water engineering and infrastructure business. ITT also asked survey participants* if they think federal, state, and local governments should…

Preparing for a Water-Limited World

Global water expert and National Geographic Fellow Sandra Postel outlines the world’s water challenges in a new book published this week by the Post Carbon Institute (PCI). “Our water problem turns out to be much more worrisome than our energy situation,” writes Postel , who is also a fellow with PCI. The Challenges Water, unlike…

More Drugs in Europe’s Water

Traces of eight illegal drugs have been detected in surface waters in Valencia, Spain, according to new research published last month in the journal Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. The study of wetland water from Valencia’s Natural Park of L’Albufera turned up evidence of cocaine, cannabis, ecstasy, and amphetamines. “The presence of these substances is a…

World Water Week Wrap Up: Hard Truths with a Twist of Optimism and a Shot of Innovation

The 20th annual World Water Week came to an end last Friday in Stockholm. Among the roughly 2,500 people there were leading water experts from the fields of engineering, biology, ecology, education, hydrology, politics, chemistry, and negotiation. Are they optimistic? 2010 Stockholm Water Prize winner Rita Colwell summed it up for National Geographic News by…

365 Trillion Gallons of Water Thrown Away With Our Food Every Year

Next time the person sitting across the table from me jokes about my tendency to finish every last bite, I will be able to defend my gut reaction to not waste food. (After I’m finished chewing, of course.) Recent studies now quantify the water and energy costs of discarded and spoiled produce, grains, meat, and…

Six Steps For Avoiding a Global Water Crisis

Colin Chartres, director of the 25-year-old International Water Management Institute (IWMI), and co-author of the new book Out of Water: From Abundance to Scarcity and How to Solve the World’s Water Problems talks to National Geographic News about how the planet can steer clear of budding water and food crises. In your new book, you…

Drip Irrigation to Solve Famine in the Sahel?

Local vegetable markets in Niger, Benin, Burkina Faso, and Senegal, could be flush with produce, despite drought conditions, thanks to a new agricultural system that combines efficient irrigation with new varieties of plants, according to scientists speaking today at the African Green Revolution Forum in Accra, Ghana. (News via press release.)   Drought has plagued…

Coal Ash Continues to Pollute Groundwater

Public hearings started today for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency‘s (EPA) proposed rule on how to dispose of coal ash–the toxic byproduct of burning coal. In December, a billion gallons of coal ash spilled from the Kingston Fossil Plant in Tennessee, poisoning a river and burying neighboring homes. The disaster, which occurred four months before…

The Colorado River IS Running Dry

By Jonathan Waterman During a recent discussion of water at the Aspen Institute’s Environment Forum In Colorado, former Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt told a packed house: “The American Southwest is not one of those regions where there is water scarcity. It’s hard to believe, given all the hyping in the national and local and regional…

41 Countries Refuse to Vote on U.N.’s Resolution Making Water a Basic Human Right

The United Nation’s General Assembly voted Wednesday to make water a basic human right. But 41 countries, including the United States, opted out, saying they were waiting for more data. What isn’t in question is the lack of clean water and sanitation for millions around the globe. According to the U.N., 884 million people lack…

Clean Energy the Solution to Western U.S. Water Woes

Cleaner energy sources could help solve Western U.S. water shortages, according to a report released this month by the nonprofit Western Resource Advocates. In many arid western states, water is already a precious commodity rationed among farmers, cities, recreational areas, and critical habitat for hundreds of species–many of them threatened or endangered. As climate change…

Melissa Etheridge Announces Partnership With Alexandra Cousteau and Water Expedition

New York–At her New York City show last night Melissa Etheridge rocked the United Palace Theater and peppered her performance with an environmental message. The Grammy-winning singer-songwriter announced support for Alexandra Cousteau’s 14,500-mile, five-month tour dedicated to documenting water stories from around North America.       Cousteau opened the show for Etheridge, engaging the…

Cousteau’s Granddaughter Gives Water a Voice

Alexandra Cousteau, Jacques’ granddaughter, and a National Geographic Emerging Explorer, can be found these days crisscrossing the country in a biodiesel-fueled bus decorated with decals and logos about water. Not the ocean water her grandfather so brilliantly explored with his camera, but the kind that flows out of our taps at home and fills the…

Passing the Point of “Peak Water” Means Paying More for H2O

We have passed the point of “peak water”–or the end of cheap, easy-to-access water–in several places around the globe, experts say. Those places include the Great Plains in the southern and central U.S., California’s Central Valley, northern China, the Nile River Basin in northern Africa, the Jordan River Basin in the Middle East, India, and…