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My name is Whitney Friedman and I’m proud to be a National Geographic Explorer. I’m blogging from Shark Bay, Western Australia, where I’ve joined Dr. Richard Connor’s 30-year study on male alliances among bottlenose dolphins to discover how it is that these fascinating creatures establish and maintain relationships within a complex social network that may be more similar to humans than to any other species.

Read more as I recount the adventures, challenges, and highlights of this season!

Dolphins Compete in a Wash of Splashing, Flying Flukes

In a world of competing male dolphin alliances, there is a struggle for power in which only one alliance can emerge victorious.

Dolphin Mating Season Begins!

Love is in the air at Shark Bay.

Dinnertime for Dolphins in Shark Bay

National Geographic Grantee Whitney Friedman is studying some of the smartest creatures in the sea- dolphins. Their complex alliances and social interactions may be more similar to humans than any other species. Follow her expedition on Explorers Journal as she joins a 30-year study on male alliances among bottlenose dolphins in Western Australia’s Shark Bay.  —- It’s…

A Chance Reunion With a Dolphin First Studied 30 Years Ago

Passing by the dolphins who frequent the beaches near the local resort, the team starts looking for the familiar fins of their research subjects and sees a welcome and encouraging sight.

En Route to Search for Dolphins in Shark Bay

National Geographic Grantee Whitney Friedman is studying some of the smartest creatures in the sea- dolphins. Their complex alliances and social interactions may be more similar to humans than any other species. Follow her expedition on Explorers Journal as she joins a 30-year study on male alliances among bottlenose dolphins in Western Australia’s Shark Bay. …