Q&A With ‘Gorongosa Park: Rebirth of Paradise’ Cinematographer Bob Poole

Wildlife filmmaker Bob Poole answered questions about his career, inspirations and the adversities Gorongosa Park is facing.

Next LIVE Twitter Chat With Epic Walker @PaulSalopek

Difficulties with visas and permission to enter certain lands have rerouted and delayed Paul Salopek on his epic 21,000-mile walk, but now, after waiting out the worst of the Central Asian summer, he’s ready to set off once again.

Finding Enough Fish to Feed Hong Kong

With a population density of 17,000 people per square mile, Hong Kong knows it needs to find new ways to feed everyone. The ancient fishing village of Kat O is finding new ways to help.

Coyote Chomps on Sleeping Bag … With Explorer Still Inside

Few things feel better than finally getting to rest after a long day’s journey. That is—unless there’s a coyote nibbling on your sleeping bag.

How Not to Get Eaten by a Polar Bear

Renowned polar explorer Børge Ousland has had more than his share of run-ins with polar bears. How does he protect himself from the wild and hungry animals? Check out the MacGyver-esque homemade contraption that’s literally a lifesaver.

The Borobudur Temple Ship: Bringing a Memory Back to Life

Preserved in the delicate carvings of the temple’s stone, a ship serves as inspiration to revive deep cultural memories and pride.

Explorers Save Abandoned Puppy

National Geographic grantee and adventurer Cedar Wright makes a surprising—and adorable—discovery while on expedition. Find out how the “cutest puppy in the world” became a member of Wright’s team.

Running Across Iceland

Ultra runner Pavel Cenkl explores Iceland’s magnificent coasts and highlands—and the idea that all parts of the planet’s ecological system are interwoven.

Twenty Years After the Shooting Stopped, Sarajevo Searches for Its Future

Some historians say that the 20th century started and ended in Sarajevo, beginning with the archduke’s assassination, and closing with the siege. The vitality and progress in the city today give hope that 21st-century Sarajevo will be remembered for better reasons.

What Can We Learn From Homo naledi’s Skull?

From the tip of the jaw to the top of the head, remains from five naledi skulls provide tantalizing early hints about the lives of these newly found ancient human relatives.

Homo naledi’s Nike-Ready Foot

See how early in the excavation, a single ankle bone was able to show researchers that Homo naledi was walking comfortably on two feet.

Homo naledi’s Powerful Hand Up Close

With an incredibly muscular thumb and curved fingers for powerful gripping, the newly found Homo naledi could have given today’s rock climbers like Alex Honnold a run (or a climb) for their money.

How the Naledi Team Solved a 1,550-Piece Puzzle

With Africa’s largest hominin fossil find unearthed and in the lab, Lee Berger called in experts and early-career scientists for an innovative workshop to figure out just what they’d found.

Homo naledi: 1,500 Fossils Revolutionize Human Family Tree

Two years after being discovered deep in a South African cave, the 1,500 fossils excavated during the Rising Star Expedition have been identified as belonging to a previously unknown early human relative that scientists have named “Homo naledi.”

Dying Wishes From One of the Last Remaining Micronesian Master Navigators

The sacred knowledge of navigating by the stars has been passed down for many generations in Micronesia. Today, with the convenience of modern instruments and technology, only a handful of people still retain this precious knowledge. These “Master Navigators” exist within a paradox where convenience often trumps custom and the gap between traditional and modern grows exponential wider with time. Nearing the end of his life, one Master Navigator has an important message for all those who are willing to listen…