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Kittens-Sighting Is a Big Leap for Florida Panther Conservation

We just learned that at least two Florida panther kittens were found north of Caloosahatchee River for first time in decades. This is groundbreaking news for the recovery of an endangered big cat species and a clear cause for optimism.

Sudan Border Walk: Pottery Shards Suggest Ancient Bantu Settlements

The slave-raiding here continued well into the beginning of the 20th Century. Cherry saw first-hand, just before the turn of the century, the devastation of villages, and slavers on raids. He witnessed cannibalism on a large scale, of the people who were not considered to be fit to be slaves. So these bits of pottery here are the remnants of one of those villages that may have gotten raided. It was nestled deep in the hills. Further to the north here I have seen entire alternate villages built into the rocky hills for protection from the raiders.

Sudan Border Walk Day 16: First Day Without Someone Being Sick

We reached the river at our target around noon. The water has also come up here. Took an afternoon stroll and saw fresh waterbuck tracks. In the evening, when the sun is going down and it starts to cool off, I am struck by four things: the beauty, the enormity, the thought of all this habitat that is intact (yet empty), and a mixed feeling of desperation and sadness that not more has been done to protect this gem on Earth.

Sudan Border Walk: A Landscape Ready for Rewilding

As we cross the landscape, I am snapping pictures of the various vegetation types, and thinking about restoring this place. Compared to endless places around the world, I thought this place is like a city for animals that is completely equipped: the water and lights work, the buildings are in place, it just lacks the wildlife. I think about old sheep farms in South Africa, where they remove the sheep, restore the vegetation and watersheds, and bring back every species of large mammal that existed there before. Here, compared to the millions of hectares already restored in South Africa, this place is a piece of cake. The savanna, its forest, grass cover, creeks and rivers, and the remnants of fauna are all here.

Sudan Border Walk: Camping on a Beach at the Chinko River

The team walked well. We reached the Chinko at 11h30 of marching. The water levels seem to be quite a bit lower now than when we passed by earlier. We found a beautiful spot to camp, with rocks and sandy beaches and good water and shade.

I took a stroll at 16h00. I love walking slowly in the late afternoon, kind of still hunting and enjoying this beautiful place. I saw guinea fowl and quite a few francolin, then a warthog. When I got a look at this guy, he had the biggest tusks I have ever seen on a warthog. They covered his eyes, they were so long.

Hokulea Visits the Pitcairn Islands

After 11 full days on the ocean, Hawaii’s iconic sailing vessel Hokulea and her crew arrived yesterday on Pitcairn Island for the first time in nearly 20 years.

Sudan Border Walk: Eagerness to get home prompts very early start to the day

I heard rustling in the leaves around 01h30. Thought maybe it was red river hogs, so got my headlamp ready to spot them. Then I heard the clang of a pot. Somebody is up? Then I heard murmurs, and by 02h00 the campfire was alive with chatter. It was like Christmas morning; the boys were up in anticipation of the return walk. I resisted until they brought me coffee at 03h00, so I got up. What the heck, I thought, I would take advantage of the excitement and get us out of camp before dawn. Everyone was in good spirits, had eaten well the night before, and Felix, even though still acting strange, looked fine. I told them, dudes, it is 60 km further going back than coming, so don’t burst any seams.

When Kids Learn to Raise Bees, the Future Gets Sweeter

In Kisii, beekeeping is not a hobby. It is an important pillar of the community, not just for the valuable honey it produces, but also the role that bees play in the ecosystem—a role whose function and dynamics are keenly felt by everyone in the region.

Finding No ‘Hunter’s Paradise’, Central African Expedition Heads Home

On the trail walking, you have a lot of time to think. That is one reason why I love to walk; just cruise along, keep focused on the visuals and sounds, but also let your mind explore. Today is a sad day, but also always a bit of relief, because we are on our homeward leg. Sad, because we are not penetrating into the unknown any more, but relieved because we are alive, in good shape and every day we will be closer to the Chinko Project HQ.

We have accomplished our objective out here, get as far as you can from human settlement and see if there any remnants of William Stamps Cherry’s world that he saw.

Sudan Border Walk: Return to the South Because of Lack of Water

We hit the destination creek, having left the Douyou on its northward path. Well, it was bone dry. Like the soil had no indication of moisture. We walked about a kilometer of river bed, no joy. We knew we would run out of water at some point. In fact, some water we used this morning had a real high suspended-solution of gunk and mud. Anyway, no sense in moving forward with no water, so we crossed the river and headed east toward the Douyou.

Ever Dreamed of Being an Archaeologist?

Growing up, I was obsessed with Indiana Jones—and today, I’m lucky enough to be an archaeologist who digs regularly in Egypt. Now, I get to help others live out the dream with GlobalXplorer. Here are some of their stories.

Sudan Border Walk: Ready to Push to the Limit Without Water

We pitched up on the Douyou after about 17 km in a straight line. I had told the guys earlier that I was going to go ahead, real light, with just Felix, to see how far up the Douyou we can get before we run out of water. I want to get as close to the Sudan border as possible. So Felix is going to carry minimal food and I barebones comms.

We will shoot for two and a half days up, and the same coming down. We will leave Herve and Yaya behind. Yaya is looking very frail, and Herve is still not 100 percent, so this will give them four days to rest up and fish. So I will not be sending journal updates for four days.

Sudan Border Walk: Trekking from one pool of water to the next

For at least 4 km up from the confluence with the Chinko there is water in the Douyou. The bed is quite small and the pools are punctuated by dry river bed for about half of the way, so if it keeps up this way, we are golden.

Running Naked into the Night, Fleeing Swarm of Biting Driver Ants

I was driven from my sleep halfway, when I half-dreamt half-felt things biting my head. Then two seconds later, I knew what I was dealing with. Let’s just say, been there before. My tent was full of driver ants that were treating me like one giant piece of prey.

Big Cats on Camera

Volunteer crews with Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation have captured mountain lions, ocelots and bobcats on camera traps, and found sign of lynx and snow leopard.