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Would You Walk Into a Room With Millions of Bees?

Explorer and National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli visited rural Uganda to do a cultural exchange with small-scale farmers. He decided to face his fear of bees by going right into an apiary filled with venomous bees.

Secrets of Stunning Ocean Photography

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Enric Sala has visited and photographed some of the most remote and beautiful places in the ocean. Hear him reveal what he’s learned.

Lust for Loot: Collecting Is Driving the Demand for Plunder

Looting in Egypt doubled in 2009-2010, on the heels of global recession, then doubled again following the Arab Spring. It’s a powerful source of income in times of stress, but it only pays because people will buy.

Climbers Try Biking—Wipeout Ensues

As part of an effort to climb 45 iconic rock towers, world-renowned climbers Cedar Wright and Alex Honnold attempt to bike across the desert. They do not come out unscathed.

Searching for the Pure Life in Paradise

Costa Rica is one of the world’s most eco-conscious countries, but it still has issues to deal with. How well can it live up to its motto of supporting a “Pura Vida”?

Watch: Inside the World’s Longest Sea Caves

Geologist and National Geographic grantee Nicolas Barth was studying active faults on New Zealand’s South Island when he decided to climb down some cliffs and go for a swim. That’s when he discovered the longest sea cave in the world.

Seeking an End to the Terror of Rabies in Madagascar

Though death is preventable if vaccines are received quickly, rabies still kills with terrifying frequency, and manifests itself so violently that witnesses tend to remember a single case for years.

Best Job Ever: Mapping “California’s Galápagos”

Cartographers and National Geographic grantees Marty Schnure and Ross Donihue traveled to the little-known Farallon National Wildlife Refuge to document the scientists who live there and to create an interactive digital map to allow the public to explore the islands from afar. The Farallon National Wildlife Refuge is closed to public access to protect this…

Indigenous Amazonians Reeling From Oil Spills in the Jungle

An oil pipe can burst anywhere, even deep in the Amazon. Even there, not only does the environment suffer, people must struggle with far-ranging damage and contamination.

Tracking Tigers Is Just As Dangerous As It Sounds

Matthew Luskin is a conservation biologist, wildlife ecologist, and National Geographic grantee. He spent a year in the rain forest of Indonesia tracking tigers through the remaining three largest national parks—and it was seriously dangerous. “When there’s a tiger around you can’t sleep. You can barely eat. You can’t do anything because all you are…

Plastics Found in One of Hawaii’s Most Remote Streams

Adventure Scientists for the Global Microplastics Initiative reach the most remote corners of the globe to help us understand the extent of plastic pollution worldwide. Collecting freshwater samples will provide critical data that can identify sources of microplastics in order to eliminate their introduction into the world’s water supply. Christian Shaw and Céline Jennsion of Plastic Tides are long-time ASC adventurers and…

Tagging Adorable, Nasty Little Penguins: #bestjobever

The world has had a love affair with penguins for some time now. Their tuxedo-colored feathers, waddling walk, and awkward mannerisms make them easy to adore. But get too close to penguins—chinstrap penguins in particular—and your endearing perception of these birds may be tested, given their penchant for projectile pooping and beating each other up.

William Gray, 86, Pioneer Of Hurricane Meteorology

Pioneering meteorologist William Gray, who devised seasonal forecasting for hurricane activity, died earlier today surrounded by his family in Fort Collins, Colorado. He was 86. His death was announced by the Colorado State University News Service, but word of his passing was posted on Facebook before the university’s official announcement. Gray joined the CSU faculty…

Why I Didn’t Want to Study the Norse World—But I’m Very Glad I Did

Last June, I was lucky enough to be part of a team that located a potential Norse site in eastern Canada, several hundred miles south of where experts expected one to be. This site, Point Rosee, has gone viral and is featured in a two-hour Nova special, Vikings Unearthed (watch it now). So I need…

Weaving Science With Storytelling on the American Prairie Reserve

Standing in the lee of some hills as other more industrious crew members retrieve data from a wildlife trapping camera, I wonder if the coyotes are howling today for the pronghorn that ducked under the fence not a few miles back. This hole in my knowledge—why do coyotes howl and for whom?—tugs a little at my anxious heart.