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Return to the World’s Oldest Desert (and Its Bats!)

Theresa Laverty studies the drivers of desert bat abundance and diversity for her Ph.D. in Joel Berger’s lab at Colorado State University. She has returned to Namibia a second time and is in the midst of another year of fieldwork.

How Crowdsourced Archaeology Could Help Solve the Mysteries of Peru

Archaeologists have studied the ancient city of Petra for more than 200 years. So I didn’t feel wildly hopeful about finding anything unknown when I did a satellite survey of the site in 2012. But then, there it was: a massive monumental platform. There are hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of unknown archaeological sites…

Abyssinian Owl Remains Elusive Amidst Beauty and Hardship on Mt Kenya

Mount Kenya is equal parts beautiful and brutal.  Amidst the moorlands, Lobelias rise like skyscrapers, and lacking competition from the other odd-ball assortment of plants in this “Planet of the Apes” landscape, they protrude like beacons marking your slow progress one agonizing step at a time. At nearly 12,000 ft (3650 m), the only things…

Traditional Seafarers Gather to Celebrate Art and Culture in the Pacific Islands

Last month, traditional voyagers from all throughout Oceania sailed to Guam to attend the 12th Annual Festival of the Pacific Arts. This event, happening every four years, brings together islanders from 27 different island nations for a celebration of culture, art, and most importantly, solidarity.

Journey Through the Largest Cave in the World

Sơn Đoòng Cave—the largest in the world—wasn’t discovered until 2009. Now, National Geographic grantee and photojournalist Martin Edström, takes us deep inside Sơn Đoòng, as he tries to capture its overwhelming size and beauty in 360 degrees.

An Archaeology Summer Reading List

It’s summertime, which means: summer reading. Specifically, summer reading that sends me to far off places, and lets me daydream of being out on a dig.

Big Black Bears Celebrated in Big Way in Washington County, North Carolina

On a recent spring morning, photographer Doward Jones and a friend were looking for photo opportunities in the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge near Plymouth, North Carolina. As they cruised through the refuge in an SUV, they spotted a black bear helping himself to wheat in a farmer’s field. The young male bear was enjoying…

Hawaii’s Legendary Voyaging Canoe Makes History at the UN

Hawaii’s legendary traditional voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa achieved the pinnacle of her historic four-year sail around the world at today’s United Nations (UN) celebration of World Oceans Day: a global event focused on ocean celebration and collaboration for a better future. This year’s theme of “Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet” encouraged individuals and organizations across the globe to…

Capsized by a Hippo on the Okavango Expedition

Steve Boyes and Giles Trevethick were paddling down the Cuito River in Angola when a huge hippo capsized their canoe—leading to the swim of their lives.

Learning to See the Forest for the Bees at Olympic National Park

“How many species of bees do you think there are?” I realize at this moment that I can only think of about three, which is clearly the wrong answer. JD Herndon and Houston Guy, entomologists who have come up to Washington State from Utah, wait patiently with little grins on their faces. They know most…

Brutal Crackdown on Election Reformers in Kenya’s Biggest Slum

By Ashley Wilson and Joshua Ogure Last Monday, Kibera slum was a chaotic scene of stone-wielding protesters in conflict with Kenyan police forces armed with live ammo, water cannons, and tear gas. In the fourth so far in a series of weekly protests against Kenya’s Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), many protesters were prevented…

Submarine Diving in Deep-Sea Galápagos: #bestjobever

What’s it like to submarine dive a thousand feet underwater to an unexplored region of the Galápagos Islands? Marine conservationist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Jessica Cramp takes us on a journey to find out.

Would You Walk Into a Room With Millions of Bees?

Explorer and National Geographic grantee Chris Bashinelli visited rural Uganda to do a cultural exchange with small-scale farmers. He decided to face his fear of bees by going right into an apiary filled with venomous bees.

Secrets of Stunning Ocean Photography

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Enric Sala has visited and photographed some of the most remote and beautiful places in the ocean. Hear him reveal what he’s learned.

Lust for Loot: Collecting Is Driving the Demand for Plunder

Looting in Egypt doubled in 2009-2010, on the heels of global recession, then doubled again following the Arab Spring. It’s a powerful source of income in times of stress, but it only pays because people will buy.