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Using Science, Exploration, and Storytelling to Change the World in 2015

This year proved that there’s still so much left to explore—from discovering a new human ancestor deep in a South African cave to protecting some of the last wild places in the ocean.

When Endangered Lemurs Need a Home, This Is What You Build

A test project building tree boxes gives Madagascar’s charismatic primates a new housing option in dwindling forests.

Exploring Water, Cities, Climate, and Music in India With DJ Spooky

How do we make a portrait of a rapidly evolving world with music? That’s a question I’m asking myself throughout this journey.

Libecki Brothers Explore Vertical Virgin Earth in Greenland

It was close to 1 a.m., and the midnight sun was hiding behind the massive mountains surrounding the Libecki brothers. Before dropping them off, the captain sailed back and forth looking for polar bears. The last time Mike was here, 11 polar bears were seen in the area. Today the coast looked clear so Mike and Andy stepped onto shore.

How to Celebrate Christmas on a Volcano

Evolutionary biologist and National Geographic grantee Borja Milá went to a volcanic island in the Indian Ocean to study evolution in birds. But when Mother Nature unleashed a tropical storm on Christmas Eve, Milá’s team was stuck atop a volcano.

The Ocean and Our Explorers Need You

This week, just comment on Facebook or Twitter with “#donate $10” to help us explore, document, and garner protection for the most pristine areas of the ocean.

How Adventure Keeps Us Wild

There are elements of our human selves that are just as mysterious and unpredictable as the wilderness; elements that have remained unchanged, tethering us to the world we came from. At our core, we are still wild, too.

Spotlight on Humanity’s United Side

Desmond Tutu’s welcome to the Hōkūle’a crew shows one smile, one spirit connects people from Hawaii to South Africa and beyond.

Vultures, Too, Are Dying From Masai Mara Poison Attack

Two days ago eight members of the famous Marsh Pride of lions were poisoned inside the Masai Mara National Reserve. Also poisoned were at least six White-backed and Rüppell’s vultures, though this will never make the headlines.

#PhotoArk to Illuminate St. Peter’s Basilica

Follow @NatGeo on Twitter and Periscope to share the excitement from St. Peter’s Square with Joel Sartore, and comment on Facebook or Twitter with “#donate $10” to support the Photo Ark.

Climbing Into Volcanoes, Collecting Rocks—and Hopefully Saving Lives

When a growing population lives below two major volcanoes, someone better figure out how they work.

Meet the Explorers Crossing the World’s 20 Largest Glaciers for Climate Change

Over the course of ten years, polar explorer and National Geographic grantee Børge Ousland and his expedition partner, Vincent Colliard, are crossing the world’s 20 largest glaciers to document climate change. But traversing some of the harshest landscapes on Earth won’t keep these two adventurers from having a good time.

The Río Marañón Is Moving: Dam Construction in a Volatile Landscape

Explorers launched a raft expedition in Peru to collect data on the Río Marañón, the headwater stem to the Amazon River. The river is under threat of 2 approved dams and almost 20 more proposed dams. The team faced class V rapids and landslides to collect baseline data along the river corridor prior to dam construction.

TOMS Animal Initiative Founder Puts Her Foot Down for Big Cats

Heather Mycoskie was inspired to found the TOMS Animal Initiative when she learned that wild lions are at risk of being extinct. Through the initiative, the famously conscientious shoe company now partners with nonprofit animal conservation organizations to drive awareness and funding for global animal protection. For the latest TOMS Animal Initiative, they are partnering with National…

It’s Elementary: Wildlife Is Going Up in Smoke

National Geographic explorer and creative conservationist, Asher Jay, is sharing her visual arts at #COY11, inspiring young people to action on climate change.