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Happy 40th Birthday to Hōkūleʻa, the Canoe That Revived a Culture

When Hōkūleʻa entered the water for the first time in Kualoa 40 years ago, it was the beginning of a sail plan that has spanned generations and taken us on a 150,000-nautical-mile journey to reconnect the Pacific Ocean family that shares a common history of voyaging and exploration.

Seeing a 600-Year-Old Voyaging Canoe Up Close

Having reached New Zealand using the same techniques as their ancestors, modern Polynesian voyagers pay a visit to a fascinating artifact.

Hawaiian Navigators Among the Māori

By Captain and Pwo Navigator, Kālepa Baybayan It’s 9 a.m. and most of the crew of Hōkūleʻa, our 62-foot, deep-sea Polynesian voyaging canoe on a multi-year journey around the world, is still asleep. It’s amazing how exhausting sea travel can be. The hours of standing watch break down your natural rhythm of work-sleep cycles. The past two…

What a Family Does for a Year on a Sailboat

A family takes the trip of a lifetime and collects water samples to search for microplastics hidden in the waves.

Becoming One With Winter on the Sun Prairie

There are moments of transcendence you search out, and those that seem to find you. Life on the prairie is full of both.

Cat and Mouse vs. Bird on a Tropical Island

The bird species that have lived on Fernando de Noronha for millions of years have new predators to battle: introduced cats, rats, and a three-foot Brazilian lizard. Can they survive?

World Wildlife Day: How 10 National Geographic Explorers Are Making a Difference

Stressed animals find new habitats, baby animals have a better chance for survival, and the world keeps its natural heritage alive thanks in part to the feats these Explorers perform every day.

This Scientist Made Superhero Headlines. Why Doesn’t That Happen More Often?

What prevents the majority of scientists from making the leap from the ivory tower to the front lines?

Sangay Volcano Erupts in Ecuador

In December we’d been walking on its slopes, collecting rock samples. One month after we departed, Sangay started erupting with ferocity again.

A Bat-tastic Beginning for 2015!

After catching bats all night, I crawled into my tent at 11:59 PM and counted down to the New Year, listening to lions call in the distance and a hyena whooping nearby …

Bee With No Stripes Discovered in Kenya

It has a black head and a bright orange body, and velociraptor-like claws on its hind legs. It lives underground, not in a hive. And it lives by itself, instead of in the huge colonies we’re used to. Here’s the story of the discovery of the world’s newest-known bee. Bee-ing There The hot, dusty bush and deserts…

Behind the Photo: Inside the World’s Largest Caves

Looking at Carsten Peter’s photo of a Vietnamese cave blanketed in a mystical mist, you could be excused for thinking it was the product of Hollywood magic.

Island’s Invasive Species Wreak Havoc: How Did They Get Here?

Invasive cats, rats, and lizards are wreaking havoc on the native species of Fernando de Noronha. How did they all get here?

Fighting Back Lionfish for Invasive Species Awareness Week

In honor of Invasive Species Awareness Week, see how Floridians are working to control invasive lionfish and put them to good use.

What’s Living Under These Elephant Seals?

Most people come to the Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) to see elephant seals and penguins. Ginny Edgcomb came for the microbes.