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Happy 40th Birthday to Hōkūleʻa, the Canoe That Revived a Culture

When Hōkūleʻa entered the water for the first time in Kualoa 40 years ago, it was the beginning of a sail plan that has spanned generations and taken us on a 150,000-nautical-mile journey to reconnect the Pacific Ocean family that shares a common history of voyaging and exploration.

Seeing a 600-Year-Old Voyaging Canoe Up Close

Having reached New Zealand using the same techniques as their ancestors, modern Polynesian voyagers pay a visit to a fascinating artifact.

Hawaiian Navigators Among the Māori

By Captain and Pwo Navigator, Kālepa Baybayan It’s 9 a.m. and most of the crew of Hōkūleʻa, our 62-foot, deep-sea Polynesian voyaging canoe on a multi-year journey around the world, is still asleep. It’s amazing how exhausting sea travel can be. The hours of standing watch break down your natural rhythm of work-sleep cycles. The past two…

The Deepwater Horizon Catastrophe 5 Years On

No one missed the Deepwater Horizon disaster. People missed the recent oil spill in Bangladesh. But the world witnessed Deepwater Horizon. Millions of gallons of oil flooded the Gulf of Mexico every day — for 87 days. The biggest accidental oil spill ever. Five years later the effects of the Deepwater Horizon blowout still endure. A new study confirms a massive undersea oil mat near…

What a Family Does for a Year on a Sailboat

A family takes the trip of a lifetime and collects water samples to search for microplastics hidden in the waves.

Montserrat Turns its Focus Toward Ocean Conservation

When you land on Montserrat, your passport gets stamped with a shamrock. That is the first sign that the island has a bit of magic. The air is warm, but the people are warmer. This video introduces some of the faces and vistas of this wondrous place, the second island where the Waitt Institute has…

Reflecting on the Voyage: Around The Capes

Somewhere between Madagascar and Mozambique, Peace Boat volunteer interpreter Moe Sasaki lost her shadow. For a few hours around midday the Ocean Dream passed directly under the December sun and it was as if Sasaki’s shadow had unstitched itself and run ahead to the African continent on which she grew up. A month later, volunteer…

2015 Ocean Heroes Named

Royalty, a scientist, and a traditional Polynesian navigator are among the winners of the 8th annual Peter Benchley Ocean Awards, named after the late marine conservationist and author of “Jaws.”

Satsuma Fields: Encounters with the diaspora provoke reflections on what it means to be Japanese

When the Sakura Maru departed from Yokohama in February 1899 bound for the Peruvian port city of Callao, its 790 passengers must have had high hopes. The Meiji Government had been running campaigns advertising a better quality of life overseas, and the Morioka Emigration Company and other agents promised solid pay for four-year contracts on…

Blue Halo Initiative Expands to Montserrat and Curaçao!

VERY EXCITING NEWS! The Waitt Institute has expanded its Blue Halo Initiative to Montserrat and Curaçao, building on the recent success in Barbuda. The new partnerships with these two innovative island governments and communities will help envision, design, and implement sustainable ocean policies for their waters. With the launches of Blue Halo Montserrat and Blue…

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Managing Marine Reserves

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3   Part 4 It is a simple diagram, and Cristen Don and Stacy Galleher laugh wryly as they show us. Four overlapping circles represent their team’s responsibilities: “Policy and Administration (1 staff),” “Ecological Monitoring (2.5 staff),” “Human Dimensions Monitoring (1 staff),”…

Using Science to Empower Communities and Improve Marine Protected Areas in East Africa

By Jennifer O’Leary and Arthur Tuda When you think about East Africa, probably the first images that emerge are of large terrestrial animals like elephants and lions. Many people don’t know that East Africa has vibrant marine fishing communities and hundreds of miles of coral reefs. In a typical morning, you watch the sun rise…

Race for Water Odyssey against Plastic Pollution – The Countdown Begins

Less than one month from the big launch, the R4WO teams are putting the final touches on the expedition’s preparations. Technical details are adjusted, and bonds between team members grow stronger through training sessions in Lorient (France). Everything falls into place under optimal conditions before the trip to Bordeaux, R4WO’s first stop.   Final Tests:…

Listening to the volcano: Nasa communities blend ancestral knowledge with contemporary seismology in Colombia

On Ricardo Mena’s first humanitarian mission with the United Nations in April 1994, the only way to fly over southwestern Colombia’s Valle del Cauca was by police helicopter. Mena had been assigned to track indigenous Nasa displaced by the Páez River earthquake, but an eager police officer kept leaning over to photograph the poppy fields…

Fair Trade Writes New Chapter In Story of Tuna

  Tuna is the second most popular seafood in the United States, yet for most Americans, it’s a non-descript protein puck that inevitably gets mixed with mayonnaise and celery. Maybe the tuna in that can came from the Philippines, or Micronesia? Perhaps it was caught by a Japanese vessel and transferred to a processing plant…