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Book saves bird’s life: The story of Albie the Albatross

Co-authored by Erica Cirino About a year and a half ago, Melissa Ursey was riding in the car as her husband Jerry drove across the Southern California desert back to their home in Rancho Mirage from their friends’ house in Desert Springs. As the car cruised through the town of Palm Desert, Jerry noticed something…

When Poverty and Marine Conservation Are Linked, Start a Responsible Fishing Movement

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. Imagine, for a moment, that you’re…

Diving Deep Below Arctic Ice to Bring Back Our Ocean’s Skeletons: #bestjobever

Polar expeditions to explore the ocean are not for the faint of heart. Above the water’s surface, you better be on alert for polar bears. Below, you better be game for diving 60 feet under sea ice into freezing temperatures. Watch National Geographic grantee Branwen Williams lead a team to the Canadian Arctic to do both in an effort to better understand how our oceans and the climate are changing over time.

Frank Ocean Versus the Actual Ocean

  It’s nice that Frank Ocean just released his long-anticipated new album, ‘Blond’, that some say is truly awesome. But the fact that his name linked to 12 of 20 articles on Google’s News search under the word ‘ocean’ on Sunday and on Monday had proportionately grown to 6 out of 9 ‘ocean’ news stories might also…

Woods Hole Science Aquarium update: One internship ending, new doors opening

By Jessica Perelman Jessica is a recent graduate of the University of Southern California with a degree in biological sciences. She will attend veterinary school next year and plans to pursue a career in wildlife and conservation veterinary medicine. When I first stepped through the doors at the Woods Hole Science Aquarium ten weeks ago, I…

One Person’s Trash, an Artisan’s Treasure

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. How many of us take trash…

Pacific Bluefin Tuna and the Spirit of Aloha

Bluefin delicacies like otoro and chutoro are part of Japan’s culinary tradition. Pacific bluefin are also caught and delivered fresh to our local fish auction in Hawaii. These traditions are at risk if we don’t respond swiftly to the species’ population decline. We chefs must take Pacific bluefin off our menus now, and give these powerful fish a chance to rebound.

Let’s come together now to do what’s right for Pacific bluefin tuna.

Will U.S. Luck Hold During Peak of Hurricane Season?

Although dozens of powerful hurricanes have formed in the Atlantic Basin during the past decade, the last time a major hurricane with winds exceeding 110 mph struck US shores was when George W. Bush was president during the stormy summer of 2005. So as we head into the time of year that author Ernest Hemingway…

How do humpback whales locate food? Scientists need your help to find out

Co-authored by Erica Cirino Interested in supporting scientists who study how whales use their ears to find food in the noisy New York Harbor? If so, read on. When sharks want something to snack on, they rely on their excellent sense of smell. When swordfish want a meal, they use their eyes. When dolphins need…

Deep Sea Bioluminescent Corals Captured for the First Time in Color HD Video

The first color HD video of deep-ocean bioluminescence in Hawaiian bamboo corals  faithfully shows the behaviors described by Oceanographer Sylvia Earle and others decades ago — until now never seen by anyone other than those who made the journey 380 meters (nearly a quarter of a mile) under the surface of the sea. DOER Marine collaborated with Canon…

Earth Overshoot Day Arrives Earlier Than Ever

Earth Overshoot Day 2016: August 8

As of today, we humans have used as much from nature in 2016 as our planet can renew in a whole year. Nothing will seem to change for many of us between today and tomorrow, but collectively we are draining Earth’s capacity to provide. Overshoot Day is a red light warning of trouble ahead — and it is flashing five days earlier than it did last year (Aug. 13); eleven days earlier than the year before (Aug.19).

Sylvia Earle Revisits Hawaii’s Deep Frontier

National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Sylvia Earle just completed three of the four days of Pisces submersible time in Hawaiian waters, funded by a National Geographic Society grant awarded in July. Another dive is planned for early September. “The research goals included working with deep coral and fish experts Dr. Frank Parrish and Dr. Richard Pyle to…

Icelandic cod: carrying the torch for sustainable seafood at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games

The Olympic and Paralympic Games present a great opportunity to forge positive links between sport and the environment. This year, as part of a commitment to sustainability, 100% of the cod served to athletes in the Olympic and Paralympic Village comes from Visir, a family-run fishing business in Grindavik, south west Iceland.

World Heritage in the High Seas: A New Ray of Hope for Our Ocean Commons

Although the open ocean is remote, it is not safe from threats like climate change, deep seabed mining, navigation and plastic pollution. That is why the World Heritage Centre and the International Union for he Conservation of Nature partnered with the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, The French Marine Protected Area Agency, Swiss watchmaker Jaeger-LeCoultre, with additional support from the Nekton Foundation, to explore the potential for applying the World Heritage Convention to iconic sites in the High Seas.

What Drives a California Woman to Save Starving Sea Lions? The answer may help scientists save our seas.

The emaciated seven-month-old sea lion pup was cowering in the bushes along the coast north of San Francisco in a driving, cold rain when Sue Hawley gingerly approached. Hawley put on gloves, grabbed a towel, tiptoed toward the brush, and reached in to pull out the scared animal. As she gripped firmly under its flippers,…