Nearly Crushed By a Flipping Iceberg

Frozen in time, Franz Josef Land is one of the last lingering remnants of the truly wild Arctic. The remote and nearly uninhabited 192-island archipelago is renowned for its biodiversity, which includes polar bears, walruses, bowhead whales, belugas, and narwhals. The intensifying impact of climate change, however, nearly turned this serene environment deadly for National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Enric Sala and his crew.

Life on the Shore-Based Team: the Other Half of a Telepresence Expedition

Half the scientists are on the ship, half are in a high-tech command center on land. Which is more fun? Well that depends …

Alaskans Eat Fish—Lots of It!—So Let’s Keep Their Waters Clean

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. We all know that eating fish…

Introducing Sentry, Our Autonomous Secret Weapon on the Seafloor

Say hello to a powerful new mapping and imaging platform dressed in sleek yellow fiberglass sharing deck space with Alvin, the newly refurbished human-occupied sub with a long history of transformative discovery.

Exploring New England’s Recently Discovered Methane Seeps

This is an ambitious expedition, even by the carpe-diem, plan-each-dive-as-if-it’s-your-last standards of seagoing science.

Tracking Antarctica

The largest wilderness on Earth – Antarctica is also the most isolated continent. The oceans around Antarctica are some of the most pristine in the world with more than 8,000 marine species, more than half of which are seen nowhere else in the world. However, this epic wonder is under pressure. Parts of the Antarctic…

Solving Humanity’s Grand Challenges Requires a Healthy Ocean

Human well-being and human rights are inextricably tied to the health of the ocean, yet ocean conservation work is often isolated. Last month, as the United National General Assembly focused on tackling the grand challenges represented by the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), both the ocean goal (aka Goal 14, “Life Under Water”) and me, as…

Marine Ecotourism: The wealth of the oceans goes well beyond fisheries

Oceans have always been a source of wealth. But our ability to extract resources and dump waste has surpassed the ocean’s capacity to adapt to these impacts. With nets growingly empty, some communities found an opportunity to use the ocean’s resources in a different way: marine ecotourism.

Changing Arctic: On Board Healy Icebreaker

The newest and most technologically advanced polar icebreaker in the United States fleet is the US Coast Guard icebreaker Healy. The Healy is involved in research in the Arctic, where 80 crew members and 50 scientists are often at sea for weeks on end.

Terrestrial Conservation on Tetiaroa

On Tetiaroa Marlon Brando wanted to “to maintain the natural beauty of the atoll setting” and as our expedition draws to a close we too are marvelling at the natural marine and terrestrial beauty of the atoll.

Pacific Leatherback Conservation Day: Their Future is in Our Hands

By George Shillinger, PhD

Leatherbacks and other sea turtles are ancient creatures. When dinosaurs roamed the earth 110 million years ago, sea turtles were present, in abundance. But today, numbers have dropped to 0.1 percent of their historic highs.

Pacific Leatherback Conservation Day, established by the State of California in 2013, is a day to raise awareness about the conservation of the Pacific leatherback sea turtle. Join us in celebrating these amazing animals!

National Seafood Month: An Opportunity to Think About Sustainable Local Ways to Grow Fish

By Joe Hankins, director of the Freshwater Institute, The Conservation Fund October is National Seafood Month. What better time to examine the critical role seafood plays in our global food system? Given that over 90 percent  of U.S. seafood is currently imported, and that twice the current supply will be needed by 2050, there is an urgent…

Antarctic invertebrates: cheaters, kidnappers and possibly lifesavers?

This past March, I had the privilege to visit the Antarctic Peninsula with One Ocean Expeditions as part of a discussion among Antarctic stakeholders on the future of Antarctica. I enjoyed seeing all the typical Antarctic animals – penguins, whales, and seals – but a real highlight was getting to meet Dr. Bill Baker at…

How & Why Consuming Shark Fins & Meat Can Put both Humans and Sharks at Risk

I have previously blogged about the how the demand for shark fin soup poses a large threat to shark populations. However, newly published research has found high concentrations of toxins linked to human neurodegenerative diseases in the fins and muscles of 10 species of sharks. In the study, fins and muscle tissue samples were collected…

Beveridge Reef: From Shallow Seas to Darker Depths

Once again, the Pristine Seas drop cameras reach the bottom of the ocean and reveal a species never seen in this area before.