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Seen and not heard: Six months after the World Cup, little has changed for Rio’s Favela footballers

In many ways Breno Washington is a typical 15-year-old boy. He has the look of someone whose body grew slightly too quick for him, but he wears it easy anyway, like a pair of good jeans; he likes the Chicago Bulls and sometimes he smokes marijuana with his friends. Unlike most boys his age, however,…

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Otter Rock

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3 We walk on the ocean floor in Otter Rock Marine Reserve, and we may as well be underwater, the air is so thick with mist. The low tide has exposed a glinting stage of seaweed full of clefts and holes. The…

The 2015 Fish 2.0 Competition: A Chance for Seafood Businesses to Build on Investor Interest

Three years ago, when I first started asking investors why they didn’t put more money into seafood ventures, many told me that there just weren’t enough strong businesses out there to warrant the time and energy of adding seafood to their portfolios. At the same time, seafood businesses complained that there were not enough interested…

Effective marine protection: what does the science say?

The pressing need for the creation of marine protected areas (MPAs) (sometimes called as marine reserves) is discussed often on the Ocean Views blog. MPAs and reserves can help ecosystems recover, provide climate refuges and even protect humans. So we know that marine protection has a huge potential to improve environmental outcomes. But the MPAs…

Where Is a Lion a Shark? In the Savannas of the Sea

Mtumbwi hauwezi kujua panapokuwa pamejaa maji. (Swahili) The dugout canoe does not know the depth of the water. (English) So believe the Hangaza, an ethnic group living along Lake Victoria near Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. The lake has long been an object of contemplation for the Hangaza. They know that animals like crocodiles swim just beneath…

Does it fit? Tsina Endor on making peace with the taboo in rural Madagascar

In the ancestor worshipping religion practiced across Madagascar’s 18 tribes, the zebu – a species of domestic cattle originating in South Asia – is integral to marking life’s milestones. When a child gets its first haircut, the clippings are stirred into zebu back fat and eaten by family members with a rum chaser; when a…

What’s happened to all the striped bass?

Some people jump out of airplanes or go rock climbing for an exhilarating time. For me, it’s chasing striped bass—big, powerful, and beautiful. I always feel a rush of excitement as my fishing line goes screaming off the reel once a large bass takes my lure, knowing that while adult bass in the ocean typically…

Harvesting the Unlikely Fruits of Oil and Gas

I’m not sure what I expected when I rolled over the side of our boat to once again dive the long legs of Platform Eureka off of Long Beach. I had explored her depths before- but this time something was different…she had been ‘shaved’ down to about 65ft of all the mussels, scallops, strawberry anemones…

Galapagos Popular Pit Stop for Pregnant Whale Sharks

By Gloria Dickie, Turtle Island Restoration Network Intern With 13 major islands and over 100 rocky islets, the Galapagos Islands are a dream destination for many adventurous travelers, but their popularity isn’t limited to the scuba diving crowd. A new study co-authored by Turtle Island’s Conservation Science Director Alex Hearn reveals the Galapagos Islands are…

Township Swing: Tony Elvin’s campaign to move the heart of Cape Town

In a repurposed primary school in Langa, the Western Cape’s oldest township, Tony Elvin asked 27 Japanese Peace Boat passengers what they thought was the opposite of love. Elvin’s visitors, most of whom had attended lectures on the legacy of apartheid before disembarking in Cape Town on December 23, conferred: hate, one offered. Twenty years…

Obama Gives Bristol Bay Fishermen A Great Christmas Present!

By Carl Safina and Elizabeth Brown Last month, President Obama used his executive power to protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay from future oil and gas drilling. Bristol Bay is a 52,000 square mile area (roughly the size of Florida), north of the Aleutian Islands that the largest surviving salmon populations on Earth swim through on their…

The Chameleon and the Buffalo: Peace Boat passengers learn about trauma and reconciliation in Mozambique

The power was out at the Cidadela das Criancas orphanage and the visitors from Peace Boat waited in the dark dining hall. Somebody switched on a torch and then, a shriek: shiny bugs swarmed the open windows at the new light; they collided with faces, popping on the vinyl tablecloths and scuttling over laps. “At…

The Search for Submarine Volcanos Begins

The hunt for active hydrothermal activity around the Solomon Islands is on! National Geographic Society/Waitt grantee Brennan Phillips and his team are searching for underwater volcanic activity. Their findings will be the first step towards ecosystem-based management of deep-sea mineral resources.

Nothing for us, without us: African Youth Leaders commit to Disaster Risk Reduction goals onboard Peace Boat

In a small room on Deck 6 of the Ocean Dream, youth leaders from four African countries hashed out a strategy for disaster risk reduction (DRR) on their continent as part of a collaborative project between the Peace Boat Disaster Relief Volunteer Center (PBV) and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR.) The…

Meet the Dolphin Society

Most dolphins are social animals and, like great apes and humans, derive more advantages than disadvantages from living in a group. In schools, a dolphin can attain protection from predators, ease of finding food and a convenient place to meet fertile sexual partners.