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The Power and Beauty of Two Blue Whales Racing

Everyone knows they are long (over 65 feet), they are heavy (more than 100 tons), and they are huge (heart as big as a car). But did you also know that blue whales are fast?

When Ice Melts: Tipping the Scales in the Predator/Prey Arms Race in Antarctica

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. A man is poised with a…

Video From a Whale Shark’s Point of View

Engineer Graham Wilhelm joined National Geographic Emerging Explorer Brad Norman on an expedition in Australia to put Crittercams on massive whale sharks.

The Island President Released From Prison to the UK

If you’re planning on booking that next dive trip to the Maldives, you may want to think twice. Human rights abuses there are on the rise. “I think it’s important for tourists to know the facts of what’s happening in the Maldives,” human rights lawyer Amal Cooney recently said to NBC News. “I don’t think people…

A Bluefin Tuna for $118,000: Going, Going … Gone?

By Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy Bluefin tuna is one of the ocean’s most prized fish, an icon of both modern and classic civilizations and a key predator in the ocean’s delicate food chain. And yet its very existence on this planet is now up to us — the…

Hanging Out With Sea Lions at Los Islotes

Los Islotes, Gulf of California — “This is one of the few places where one can swim so easily with sea lions and enjoy them from their perspective,” said John Francis, sea lion expert and wildlife filmmaker, before we jumped into the water swirling around a set of rocky islets known as Los Islotes, on…

Brink of Extinction: A Technological Approach to Saving the Last Vaquita Porpoises

San Felipe, Baja California, Mexico — In the silty blue waters of the northern Sea of Cortez, off the coast of the small fishing town of San Felipe, lives the smallest and rarest marine mammal in the world. Vaquita marina, whose name loosely translates to “little cow of the sea,” is a member of the…

California Driftnet Fishery: One in Eight Fish Caught Is the Targeted Swordfish

Turtle Island’s latest report, California Driftnet Fishery: The True Costs of a 20th Century Fishery in the 21st Century Overview, by Doug Karpa, Peter Fugazzotto and Todd Steiner, makes a compelling case for phasing out this deadly swordfish fishery that kills large numbers of whales, dolphins, sharks and non-target fish. The report exposes the facts about…

Saving a Species and Spending Christmas with Penguins

January 20 is Penguin Awareness Day. The following is a blog post by Sheri Hendricks, Animal Care Specialist at Shedd Aquarium, about her experience helping save African penguins from extinction. Most people spend Christmas with their families. I was lucky enough to spend it with penguins. As a nationally recognized leader in rescue and rehabilitation, Shedd…

Whales Speak: Breaking Down Language Barriers

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. By Madeleine Pauchet Along the coast…

Swimming With the World’s Biggest Fish, the Whale Shark

Bay of La Paz, Gulf of California — Jumping into the Sea of Cortez to swim alongside a whale shark is like being in a National Geographic documentary. The massive fish looms out of the murk, swimming toward you with huge mouth agape. Just when you imagine you might be sucked Jonah-like down the gullet of the…

Saving Baja Blue Whales for Generations to Come

National Geographic Sea Bird, Gulf of California–Since life began on Earth there has not been any animal bigger than one that lives with us today: the blue whale. To see this colossus of the ocean right in front of you, expelling a geyser 30 feet into the air as it comes up for breath, is humbling — not only because of…

Sharks Use Seamounts as a Compass to Navigate Through the Ocean

National Geographic Sea Bird, Gulf of California — The National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration (CRE) got to travel into the ocean realm of one of its most celebrated shark researchers last week, when it it was accompanied on a field inspection in the Gulf of California by Pete Klimley. The recipient of 11 National Geographic…

National Geographic Undertakes Science Expedition to the Gulf of California

San José del Cabo, Mexico — Sea lions, whales (blue and humpback), bull sharks, whale sharks, dolphins and sea snakes were among the abundance of marine life observed by the National Geographic Committee for Research and Exploration (CRE) on its 2016 field inspection, which ended this weekend on the southern tip of Mexico’s 775-mile-long Baja California peninsula. The…

Peru Affords Full Protection to World’s Largest Known Manta Population

In a significant move to safeguard the world’s largest known manta population, Peru’s Ministry of Production announced on January 1, strong regulations to protect the oceanic manta ray. It is now illegal to target, capture, and retain a manta ray or trade in any manta parts across their entire range, from Peru to Ecuador, where they are already legally protected.