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Inspiring Ocean Protection Through Photography

At the height of summer many of us are dreaming of cool ocean breezes, swimming in lakes, and playing in rivers.  Our ocean and inland waters provide endless opportunities for recreation, and also endless opportunities to appreciate the beauty – and vulnerability – of the resource that sustains our planet. We know that photography has…

New Study Showed Spawning Frequency Regulates Species Population Networks on Coral Reefs

New research on tropical coral reef ecosystems showed that releasing larvae more often is beneficial for a species’ network. The study on reproductive strategies is critical to assess the conservation of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Researchers from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science used a computer model developed by…

Study of ‘Senior Citizen’ Marine Snails Uncovered How Nerve Cells Fail During Learning

A new research study on marine snails uncovered the first cells in the nervous system to fail during aging. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers’ findings are important to better understanding the underlying mechanisms of age-related memory loss in humans. Scientists performed tail reflex experiments on the hatchery-reared…

Arctic Diplomacy requires Convergence of Military and Scientific Interests

Scientists and the military have a long history of engagement but largely in a client-donor relationship. Yet, global environmental change is providing another opportunity for more “natural” convergent cooperation that was manifest at an unusual meeting of academia and the military held at the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources (RSENR) at the University…

Brave Duo to Dive Unexplored Waters

Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation has amassed an incredible and diverse group of adventurers for our Microplastics project. Below, ASC’s own Emily Stifler Wolfe tells the story of two daring women who are headed to Kamchatka to dive—and collect samples—where no two have gone before. Grimaldi and Vagaska sent in these videos and photos from their training…

Why I Love Freediving

Humanity was born from the ocean, we survived by the ocean, and we followed the shore to the furthest corners of the planet. A story about freediving and our ancient connection to the sea.

A Modern Kind of Odyssey: the First Assessment of Ocean Plastic Pollution using Drones

The Race for Water Odyssey has so far mapped and collected data from Grape Bay in Bermuda, Porto Pim, Conceição, and Praia do Almoxarife, on the Azores, and most recently Anakena, Ovahe and Tongariki on Easter Island, as well as several beaches on Hawaii (USA), using the senseFly eBee drone. Now find out what happens to the…

Protect the Grand Canyons of the Ocean

Hidden below the surface of Alaska’s icy waters lie the world’s largest underwater canyons, both more massive than America’s Grand Canyon. Home to orcas, walrus and fur seals, albatross and kittiwakes, king crab, squid, salmon and coldwater corals, brittle stars and sponges, the continental slope and canyons of the Bering Sea (known as the Bering…

Life with the Ocean: Sharks & Surfers

By now most of us have seen the incredible footage of pro-surfer Mick Fanning fending off what experts are saying was likely a great white shark in the J-Bay Open in South Africa. The video was dramatic, but thankfully Fanning and the shark both escaped the incident unharmed. I love sharks and I love to…

By Air, By Sub & By Sea to Save Sharks

Ocean conservation and research is being taken to the next level thanks to an innovative collaboration between Turtle Island Restoration Network, Costa Rica’s National System of Protected Areas (SINAC) and the Cocos Island Marine Conservation Area (ACMIC), and the companies Alucia Productions II, Precision Integrated and Aeroval. Together we are taking to the air, the…

Thinking Outside the Box on Fisheries Management? Think Again.

This week, thanks to OpenChannels, I came across an interesting scientific article critiquing a new concept in fisheries management called “balanced harvesting”. Co-authors of the article include prominent fisheries scientists such as Rainer Froese, Daniel Pauly and Sidney Holt. (For those interested, the article is open access.) Until now, I had not heard of “balanced…

California Oil Platforms, the Unlikely Broodnest for Local Aquafarmers

The phrase California ranching brings to mind a classic Steinbeck inspired scene of cattle roaming a grassy expanse towards the open horizon. It’s a wonderful thought, but any modern Californian, or at least anyone who has driven the 5 freeway between LA and San Francisco, knows that the days of ranching on a wide open plain are over.…

If you can’t beat ’em, eat ’em

There’s a growing trend among scuba divers in the Caribbean: they’re on the hunt for something tasty… Last month, the Glass Goby (Coryphopterus hyalinus) suffered a change in status on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Previously considered of Least Concern to conservationists, this reef-dwelling fish is now listed as Vulnerable. And it isn’t alone.…

A Remote Trip in Search of Bahamian Queen Conch

Guest post by Dr. Andy Kough, research associate, Shedd Aquarium Queen conch, Lobatus gigas, is an iconic but threatened Caribbean species. The Bahamas are one of the last strongholds where conchs are still fished, but populations are in decline. The first step for protecting a species and replenishing its numbers is describing where healthy populations still…

Ocean Education – Let the Games Begin

Co-authored by Stephanie Roach, Waitt Institute Program Manager The Waitt Institute team is made up of people who spent their childhoods playing at the beach, swimming in the calm turquoise Caribbean Sea, and learning about the amazing, diverse creatures that live beneath the surface. Each of us fell in love with the ocean at a young…