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Hope for Curaçao’s Corals and the Future of Journalism

When New York Times Dot Earth reporter Andrew Revkin got in touch with me seeking a documentary topic for the environmental journalism course he co-teaches at Pace University, he walked right into my trap. I rarely pass up an opportunity to twist someone’s arm to share optimistic stories of ocean conservation (#OceanOptimism!). Curaçao has some…

The West Coast Sardine Fishery is Closed: Not Because You Eat Sardines, but Because You Don’t

By Maria Finn As a food and lifestyle writer and someone who works in the seafood industry, I’ve long encouraged people to eat the little fish, particularly sardines, herring, anchovies and other small “forage” fish that are plentiful and local to California. This summer, the Pacific Fishery Management Council closed West Coast sardine fishing due…

Mapping Ocean Wealth – Informing a Sustainable Ocean Economy

By Mark Spalding, marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy I’m a somewhat recalcitrant tweeter. I’m not quite sure whether it’s worth the effort, but last month I joined a trending topic, a first for me. I tweeted: #IAmAScientistBecause I want to explain to people how much we all NEED nature. It was honest, but I wondered…

Blue Vision’s Wave of Activists

Ocean and Coastal advocates from across the nation and our blue world converged on Washington DC May 11-14 for an inspired week of action, education, citizen lobbying and celebration. Here’s a brief summary of what occurred at the 5th Blue Vision Summit and the 8th annual Peter Benchley Ocean Awards. Following an all-day ‘Blue Mind’…

Santa Barbara Oil Spill: What Will We Learn?

A month ago, KPPC journalist Sanden Totten joined me on the Ocean Conservation Society boat during one of our regular marine mammal surveys that my research team and I conduct off Southern California. He wanted to discuss and observe first hand the increasing presence of skin lesions and physical deformities that are plaguing common bottlenose…

Inspiring Words From an Award-Winning Hawaiian Navigator

“There are people saying that going around the world on Hōkūleʻa is too dangerous; there is too much risk. The great risk of our time is not sailing Hōkūleʻa. The great risk of our time is ignorance, apathy, and inaction.”

Time For An Oil Change

By Annie Reisewitz and Sarah Martin It’s been calculated that a tanker leaking a drop of oil every 10 seconds releases 60 gallons of petroleum oil into the world’s oceans every year. Water, now more than ever, has become a precious resource in need of protection. We are facing a number of looming water-related crises…

A First Impression of Montserrat, from Below the Surface

Dispatch from the field, by Waitt Institute Science Manager Andy Estep: If you’re a geology nerd like me, hearing of Montserrat makes you think “the Emerald Isle of the Caribbean, precariously perched on the Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc along the eastern subduction zone of the Caribbean plate.” The incredible volcanology that has been forming and shaping…

Surge in Fish 2.0 Applications is Good News for Oceans, Communities and Investors

When I started Fish 2.0, many investors, foundations, and even seafood experts said it would be difficult to get more than 50 entries in a competition for sustainable seafood businesses. They were not seeing many innovative seafood businesses, and they believed most of those they did see were not looking for investment. The inaugural competition…

Hawaiian Canoe Hōkūleʻa Sets Sail for Sydney Guided by Ancient Navigation

Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe ventures outside of the Pacific Ocean for the first time as the Worldwide Voyage continues on to new horizons.

Healthy Oceans Require Healthy Policy

By Sylvia Earle Alliance / Mission Blue Our country has been making serious strides in rebuilding some of our most threatened fish species, but key members of Congress are now threatening to undo that progress and take us in the other direction. Luckily, we all have the opportunity to fight back. Over the last several…

Tracking Fish Oil Supplements to the Source

Are fish oil supplements really improving our health but hurting our oceans? That’s one question New York Times bestselling author Paul Greenberg is exploring for his next book, due out next year, The Omega Principle: The Health of Our Hearts, the Strength of Our Minds, and the Survival of our Oceans All in One Little…

“Return to Paradise” Film Premiere in Palau on Earth Day

It was standing room only by the time the film got rolling on Earth Day last Wednesday night for the premier screening of “Return to Paradise” at the Ngarachamayong Cultural Center in Koror, Palau. The President, ministers, governors, women’s network members, families, tourists and other members of the Palauan community packed the house in anticipation…

Award-Winning Environmentalists Score on Ocean Protection

On Wednesday evening, Earth Day, the Goldman Environmental Prizes were celebrated in Washington, D.C., in the 26th annual recognition of some of the world’s most fearless grassroots campaigners. The six winners from around the globe each earned $175,000 and join a prestigious group of activists from 83 countries that have been named since 1989, in…

Is Coco’s a Paradise Lost? Costa Rica exports endangered Hammerhead Sharks

Contributions by Courtney Mattison of Mission Blue    Three hundred forty two miles west of mainland Costa Rica lies an oceanic island so spectacular Jacques Cousteau called it the “most beautiful island in the world.” Cascading waterfalls cut through lush foliage, the symphony of a thousand seabirds fill the sky, and the surrounding deep waters host…