Menu

Scientists Witness Spectacular Flood Into the Red Sea

Somebody call Moses. Researchers have witnessed a remarkable Red Sea flood of their own.

Americans Compete With Asian Local Markets For Blue Crab

Last week, I traveled to Kien Giang Province in southern Vietnam to learn about the Vietnamese blue swimming crab fishery. Since 2009 a cross-sector partnership of government agencies, exporters, and WWF-Vietnam have been dealing with contentious issues related to the sustainability of this stock. In discussions with this coalition, I was struck by the contrast…

7 Photos of Diving Among Humpbacks in Tonga

Every year, humpback whales travel some 5,000 miles from the cold waters of Antarctica where they feed to the warm waters of Tonga where they give birth and rest.

In the Agulhas

On board with Lindblad Expeditions Southern Africa and Indian Ocean tour. March 27, 2015 – The Agulhas current flows down the east coast of Africa from the north. It’s described as “narrow, swift, and strong” on our briefing material aboard National Geographic Orion. As it reaches the southern tip of Africa at Cape Agulhas (Cape of…

Feeling the Ocean’s Beating Heart

In one single heartbeat, one immeasurably powerful pulse, the Indian Ocean has changed my life: On this expedition I had the most moving and beautiful dive. Moving—because we were riding the high-speed incoming spring tide that courses through Grande Passe, the main pass from the open sea into the Aldabra lagoon. At the turn of…

Your plastic is getting to the Caribbean more often than you are, and it’s spoiling your next visit

Who left their trash behind on this remote Caribbean island? Then I realized. It wasn’t left. It arrived. An endless flotilla of refuse heedlessly sent from afar. It’s heartbreaking. The image of a lone bottle washing up on a remote tropical island is the clichéd stuff of literature, movies and New Yorker cartoons. But what…

Palau’s Reefs: Journey from Destruction to Recovery

Written by Alison Barrat and Andy Bruckner On a scientific expedition to Palau this January we saw thriving coral reefs that contained many species of large, healthy corals, and only a few miles away we found desolate looking reefs that had virtually no coral at all. Our science team recorded conditions that were optimal for…

Great White Sharks of Gansbaai: No Hooking, No Handling, No Harm

On board with Lindblad Expeditions Southern Africa and Indian Ocean tour. March 23, 2015 – As we began our cruise up the southeast coast of Africa aboard the ship National Geographic Orion, we departed Cape Town, South Africa. Several of us spent the day on an outing with Marine Dynamics out of Gansbaai to see…

The Azores: First Witness to Global Marine Plastic Pollution

Having left Bordeaux on March 15, the Race for Water Odyssey arrived in the Azores on Friday afternoon, the location of the expedition’s first scientific analyses. It is estimated that 80% of pollution in the ocean is plastic. This debris has devastating effects on marine ecosystems and, as a consequence, on human beings. Entanglement, lacerations,…

Shark vs. Cameraman, Ancient Islands, More!

We dive with full grown adult sharks most days and so we are relaxed with these little ones—but it’s not so easy if you are a cameraman and get caught unaware.

Reliving a Classic National Geographic Article 60 Years Later

Nearly 60 years before our expedition to the Seychelles, Jacques Cousteau and National Geographic’s Luis Marden had their own adventures in these waters.

Sailing into Starvation Island: 70 years after the end of World War II, Peace Boat visits Guadalcanal

Musicians in shell headdresses welcomed hundreds of disembarking Japanese visitors when Peace Boat docked in Guadalcanal, its final port of call, last month. Guadalcanal receives few tourists and our arrival produced a flurry of new entrepreneurs: hawkers arranged wooden canoe figureheads and bottles of pressed coconut oil on mats spread over the concourse, and an ice-cream…

Pitcairn Islands Become World’s Largest Single Marine Reserve

Relive the adventures and stunning photos of the expedition behind the announcement of the world’s largest contiguous marine protected area.

Communities Leading the Way to Save Madagascar’s Mangroves

“About three years ago I noticed that the high tides were coming up into my rice fields, and taking the soil away with them. I’d never seen that before,” Philippe, a rice farmer from the village of Ambalahonko, tells me from under his wide-brimmed straw hat; something my fair-skinned and fine-haired self, unfortunately, did not…

Tune in: LIVE Twitter Chat With Explorer Paul Rose

Tweet your questions about ocean conservation @Paul_Rose using #NatGeoLive and join us Thursday, March 19th at 10 a.m. ET!