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Coral Restoration Research Findings Bring Positive News for the Future of Coral Reefs

Guest post by Mark Schick, collections manager, Shedd Aquarium There was grim news for the world’s coral reefs this October, when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) declared the third global coral bleaching in history. This event signifies major changes in oceanic living conditions and temperatures, some of which are brought upon by our…

A New Raft of Ocean Heroes

What does the president of a Pacific island Nation, a New York Times reporter, a French sailing expedition and the mayor of a small San Diego border town have in common? They are among the eight winners of the 2016 Peter Benchley Ocean Awards, the world’s preeminent honors for ocean conservation, sometimes referred to as…

Saving Sharks in the Galapagos, One Person at a Time

The Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic (LEX-NG) Fund aims to protect the last wild places in the ocean while facilitating conservation, research, education, and community development programs in the places we explore. This blog entry spotlights some of the exciting work our grantees are doing with support from the LEX-NG Fund. It’s a common scene. You’re at…

Fighting Dynamite With Marine Protection in Borneo

This is the devastation left by blast fishing also called fish bombing, an illegal but rampant form of fishing here in the Coral Triangle. In the practice, a fisherman tosses dynamite, or homemade bombs made from a bottle filled with fertilizer and kerosene lit by a short fuse into the water. The blast kills or stuns all fish within the vicinity, which are easily collected for market. Dangerous to the reef, this method also maims and kills fishermen, and it is not uncommon to see men with fingers or hands missing. What is left behind is a wasteland of flattened coral rubble that can take decades or even centuries to recover.

Kikeo and The Whale

Kikeo and The Whale is a bedtime story that submerges the young reader in a sea of dreams. Hand-in-hand with National Geographic Creative photographer Kike Calvo, the reader discovers a beautiful story of an encounter between Kikeo, the main character,  and a baby whale and her mom. “This children’s book comes at a time when…

Can Congress Deliver Happy Days for Fish, Fishermen?

To give you a break from the onslaught of 2015 year-in-review stories, let’s test your memory of a bygone era. Can you pinpoint the year that: “Happy Days” was the most popular television show? A gallon of gas cost 59 cents? “Rocky” won the Oscar for best film? The U.S. Navy tested the Tomahawk cruise…

Using Science, Exploration, and Storytelling to Change the World in 2015

This year proved that there’s still so much left to explore—from discovering a new human ancestor deep in a South African cave to protecting some of the last wild places in the ocean.

Top 15 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2015

Overfishing, climate change, habitat destruction, and pollution remain major threats to the world’s ocean. But amidst all that there is some seriously good ocean conservation news worth celebrating. So, to continue the tradition started last year with listing 14 Ocean Conservation Wins of 2014, here’s a rundown for 2015 that will hopefully fill you with…

What Are We Actually Protecting In The Ocean?

One of the great recent success stories in conservation is the rapid increase in the establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs). Since 2006, there has been a staggering growth of 10 million km2 of new MPAs globally, a nearly four-fold increase over the past decade. Yet there has been no baseline for measuring how well our marine species are represented in protected areas. Until now.

A new paper we have published in Nature’s Scientific Reports assesses the overlap of global MPAs with the ranges of 17,348 marine species (fishes, mammals, invertebrates). We have discovered some sobering results: most marine species are not well represented within MPAs and several hundred species are not covered at all.

With the Global Climate Deal in Paris, the Real Work is Ahead

By: Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy A lot of discussions are going on after the Paris climate agreement. There is no doubt that this agreement is not enough to secure a future for both people and nature. It is also absolutely sure that the target of limiting temperature increase…

The Ocean and Our Explorers Need You

This week, just comment on Facebook or Twitter with “#donate $10” to help us explore, document, and garner protection for the most pristine areas of the ocean.

Flipper, Where Art Thou? Tracking Dolphins Up and Down the Coast

By Maddalena Bearzi Have you ever wondered where dolphins go after you get a glimpse of them as they surf a wave or catch a bow-ride off your boat? I surely did. Bottlenose dolphins off California, one of the marine mammal species I’ve studied in this stretch of the Pacific Ocean for almost two decades…

XPRIZE Offers $7M Purse to Unlock Mysteries of the Sea

By Andrew Kornblatt While the ocean covers roughly 70 percent of our planet’s surface, we currently only have about 5-7 percent of that spectacularly large area mapped in any meaningful way. In fact, we have better maps of the surface of the moon and mars than we do of the ocean floor. XPRIZE, the non-profit foundation whose…

COP21 – A Voice for the Ocean for the First Time

After having finished the Race for Water Odyssey, the Race for Water Foundation just concluded its visit to the City of Lights. In Paris to give a voice to the oceans for the first time at the global summit, the organization presented its programme of solutions against plastic pollution at Le Bourget and aboard its…

Paris’s Shortcomings: We Need Conservation, Not Conversation

By the time the Paris Agreement reaches full power in 2020, we may have lost another 1.5 billion acres of tropical forest.