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Why do we have a World Tuna Day?

By Shelley Dearhart One of the most incredible predators in our Ocean is in danger of being lost. Pacific Bluefin tuna populations have been in jeopardy for years and new allegations of illegal and overfishing activity by Japanese fleets create a dire need for conservation measures to be taken to protect this species. Populations have…

Trump Moves to Dismantle Monuments Including World’s largest MPA

President Trump announced a plan to consider scaling back protection of 27 national monuments around the country with serious potential impacts on marine, land and cultural resources. By expanding the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument off Hawaii in August 2016, President Obama created the largest ecologically protected area on the planet by increasing the area under the first Marine National Monument under President George W. Bush in 2006. Under the Antiquities Act, only Congress has the clear authority to reduce or nullify a monument designation, not the president.

Scientists discover the secret to breaking down plastic: Beeswax-eating worms

Two years ago, biochemist Federica Bertocchini’s scientific work and beekeeping hobby collided into a major discovery: That wax worms are capable of breaking down plastic.

A date with killer whales

Wildlife photographer Jodi Frediani explains why April 20 is more than a holiday for smokers; it’s a day for whale lovers in Monterey Bay to gather & watch.

Hawiian Coastal Plastic Cleanup by Young People

Optimism versus pessimism, how do we find balance between the two when confronting the environmental challenges of today? The older generation has many opportunities to help young people to be optimistic about the future — by encouraging them to take action.  The sea offers us inspiration to act (it is la mere in French, our…

Misool bluewater shark baitball: A sign of conservation success in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

Photographer, filmmaker and conservationist Shawn Heinrichs documents new biodiversity, a sign of conservation success in Indonesia’s Misool Marine Reserve.

Diving for Coral Conservation: Chichiriviche Hope Spot

The town of Chichiriviche de la Costa is a small gem on the Venezuelan coastline, set in a tranquil bay where a freshwater river runs through the mountains and empties into the sea. The locals live in the hills just above the beach, consisting of a few hundred people whose income is derived from fishing and local tourism…

“The Fish on My Plate” review – Author and fisherman Paul Greenberg tells us which fish to eat, which to avoid and which we’re running out of

Author and fisherman Paul Greenberg decided in 2015 to consume sea animals “for breakfast, lunch and dinner…and sometimes snacks” for a whole year. When he wasn’t researching seafood recipes, cooking in or eating out, Greenberg, who is also a Pew Fellow for Marine Conservation and Safina Center Fellow, was traveling and meeting with the world’s foremost fisheries experts. He tells his story in a forthcoming PBS Frontline documentary called “The Fish on My Plate,” which airs Tuesday, April 25, at 10pm Eastern, 9pm Central.

This boat shows the way to a clean energy future

The Race for Water, a revolutionary vessel entirely propelled by a mix of clean energies has departed for its five-year round the world odyssey. Running on a mix of solar power, batteries, hydrogen, and a high-altitude kite, the ambassador vessel to the Race for Water foundation is first heading to Bermuda at the end of…

A Fly is Turning Waste into a Sustainable Fish-Free Feed

F3 Challenge contestant is recycling food waste and feeding it to insects for fish food People care about the ingredients that go into their food. We want pasture-raised eggs, organic grass-fed beef, and pesticide-free produce. We scan food labels for fake sugars, corn syrup and other additives. But beyond hoping for “best” or “good alternatives”…

Hokulea and Hikianalia Arrive in Tahiti Nearing End of Round-the-World Trip

The legendary sister canoes are reunited, anticipating the final deep-sea leg of the Worldwide Voyage

Entrepreneurs Shine a Light on Seafood Origins

Consumers who would never buy something generically labeled meat or cheese are often stuck at almost that level of information when it comes to seafood. The opaque origins and processing of many seafood products can hide a host of problems, including species fraud, illegal fishing, human rights abuses in the labor force, and pollution—as well…

A Fisherman’s Son Who Cannot Swim

Mayur, a young Koli fisherman’s son, never learned to swim because the beaches of Mumbai are too polluted. Few Koli youth want to follow their parent’s footsteps to be fishermen in Mumbai. The consumer demand for fish though is ever on the rise. Mayur teaches me to dig for clams and offers his perspective on Koli culture among shifting tides.

Consider the Octopus

Octopuses can taste with their skin, resist a pull 1,000 times their own weight, change color and shape, squirt ink, and inject venom. And even giant Pacifics—the biggest of the 250 octopus species, sometimes weighing 100 pounds—can pour their baggy, boneless bodies through an opening the size of an orange.

What’s more—and this is the most exciting aspect of this sea-dwelling “alien”—an octopus can recognize individual humans and even make friends with them. Octopuses are remarkably smart.

Oysters Built the East Coast. Now Entrepreneurs are Rebuilding the Oysters.

The East Coast was literally built on oysters. At the peak of their production as a food source, these shellfish were so plentiful from the Gulf Coast to New England that discarded shells were crushed and used to pave roads. Oysters kept bays and waterways clean—Chesapeake Bay residents didn’t need to treat or filter their…