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Saving Sharks with Satellites

In the past I have blogged about how the use of electronic tagging and tracking can support the conservation of marine animals. I have also addressed some misconceptions about shark tagging studies and discussed the value of such research for conservation. Building off these topics, I would like to share the results of two recently…

So you live near a coral reef: Why experts say that’s not good news for reef conservation

Co-authored by Erica Cirino My favorite beach on Long Island’s North Shore, where I live, is more than 700 miles away from the nearest coral reef (in Bermuda). This distance may be a good thing: Recent research suggests the further a coral reef is from human civilization, the better. (To get close from far away,…

Pesky plastic: The true harm of microplastics in the oceans

Co-authored by Jessica Perelman Pollution is evidently a major concern when talking about environmental protection in light of human development, but waste that ends up in the oceans is oftentimes overlooked. This is in part because many people do not come face-to-face with it on a daily basis, and the effects caused by contaminating the world’s…

Quick Take: Nature Protects People

By Kathy Baughman McLeod, Managing Director, Coastal Risk & Resilience, The Nature Conservancy This week, I’m in South Florida with partners from local government, the private sector and the international community to highlight the vital role that nature plays in protecting people in Miami-Dade County and coastal communities around the world. Miami-Dade is one of…

Keeping Track of ‘Students’ in a Shark Kindergarten

Remote cameras and careful tagging could solve some lingering mysteries around Clipperton Island.

What Two Decades of Change on Clipperton Island Looks Like

It’s a lucky scientist that gets to visit such a remote and difficult location twice in one career!

Our planet’s odometer is saying it is time for an oil change

By Anna Kulow As car owners, we secretly dread the moment when the odometer reading matches the number on the sticker in the upper corner of our windshield. Every 5,000 miles or so, we must take an hour out of our busy lives to get an oil change. Most of us trust the mechanic performing…

Why Clipperton Island Is a ‘Beautiful, Powerful Surprise!’

Explorer Paul Rose looks back at recent discoveries during the final days of the latest Pristine Seas expedition.

How Well Did Fiji’s Coral Reefs Survive Tropical Cyclone Winston?

By Sangeeta Mangubhai

After 10 days at sea, traveling over 500km and completing 26 dives, I have solid data on the scale and intensity of damage to the Vatu-i-Ra Seascape from Cyclone Winston – a tropical storm that passed through Fiji on the 20 February 2016.

From an Atlantic Victory to a Gulf Protest

Proposed Atlantic Drilling has gone the way of the Keystone Pipeline – bad ideas whose time has passed. President Obama’s decision to cancel his own proposed lease sales for oil and gas along the Southeast Atlantic coast on March 15 was a clear victory for grassroots activism up and down the eastern seaboard. Seaweed (marine…

Island Life

The great man Christian Jost has been camping alone on Clipperton Island for the past four nights. Not entirely alone – he’s had about 100,000 masked boobies, 7,000 brown boobies, 500 red – footed boobies, 1,500 frigate birds, 1million crabs, 2,000 rats, the rusting remains of the guano (bird poop) industry, a mysterious algae and bacteria filled lagoon, 900 coconut palms and…

The Dark Era of Orca Shows is Ending

By Maddalena Bearzi There is light at the end of the tunnel. As Tilikum, the captive killer whale at the focus of the documentary Blackfish, is approaching death from an untreatable drug-resistant lung infection, SeaWorld just announced it will end all orca breeding. No more orcas will be kept in any of their new parks…

Remarkable, Rare Photographic Moments With Amazing Ocean Animals

In a series of extraordinary photographs made over many expeditions into seldom-visited parts of the ocean, South African wildlife photographers and filmmakers Chris and Monique Fallows share some of the their most amazing experiences with the denizens of the deep. Here you will discover and learn things you have never heard of.

Assessing the Namena Marine Reserve Off Fiji’s Vanua Levu

It has been almost impossible to predict which reefs would survive Cyclone Winston and which ones would sustain serious damage. There is no clear pattern so far. We would dive on one reef to find it broken apart by waves, then turn a corner and find a reef intact and flourishing. The fish and shark life seemed at this stage to be largely unaffected. We were lucky to swim with white tip and grey reef sharks, large manta rays, and big schools of big-eyed trevally, surgeonfish, and fusiliers.

Play It By Ear and Make Friends With the Fish!

The highly energetic, beautiful reefs of Clipperton are dominated by moray eels. I’ve never seen anything like it. Typically, with most of their long bodies hidden inside holes, you only see their heads and the constantly opening and closing of their mouths displaying a fierce array of teeth. It’s different here – they are constantly…