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Urgent Global Action Needed to Stop Extinction of Earth’s Last Megafauna

A swift and global conservation response is needed to prevent the world’s gorillas, lions, tigers, rhinos, and other iconic terrestrial megafauna from being lost forever, an influential group of international scientists reported today in the journal BioScience.

Their analysis, entitled Saving the World’s Terrestrial Megafauna, covers the precipitous loss of large animal populations around the globe. The report included a 13-point declaration by 43 scientists and conservationists calling for acknowledgement that a “business as usual” mentality will result in massive species extinction. Read the declaration and study the maps showing the global decline of big land animals.

Palmetto Pipeline: An Eminent Problem

I hop off the boat into a horde of red-white-and-blue-clad 4th of July revelers. Looking back at the mighty Savannah River, I see a half dozen children playing in the water, with two sets of alligator eyeballs cresting the water thirty feet or so beyond. “What’s going on here,” I ask Tonya, my guide and…

Two Arizona Vineyards Give Back to a River through a Voluntary Water Exchange

In an effort to stem the depletion of groundwater and keep Arizona’s prized Verde River flowing, two vineyards are buying water credits through a new exchange designed to balance the basin’s water use for the good of the river and the local economy. Launched last week by the not-for-profit Friends of Verde River Greenway, the…

Water, Wildlife and Hope: Rejuvenating a Kogi Sacred Site

After years of planning, designing, acquiring materials, developing infrastructure, laying and burying 1,200 meters of pipe, and testing water quality and functionality, the seemingly impossible was achieved: for Colombia’s Kogi people, and their related tribes who rely on Jaba Tañiwashkaka, a historically sacred site, an aqueduct that provides access to water for crop irrigation and potable water for consumption is now in place. And thanks to a determined site restoration effort, alligators, nutria, and capybara are only a few of the animals now seen in a wetland previously largely devoid of wildlife.

Duplin County: Life Under the Waste Sprayer

Duplin County, North Carolina is the epicenter for industrial swine production in the United States. Housing an estimated 2.2 million hogs, this dot on the map shoulders more than its fair share of the world’s swine production load. I showed up last summer to film the stories of those trying to protect the water, land,…

What the River Knows: Portneuf River, Pocatello, Idaho

Photographs by Basia Irland (unless otherwise noted) I flood. That is what I — and all my cousins — do from time to time. It is part of our rhythm. In their hubris, humans build cities and towns right on our banks, then get upset with us when our waters rise and destroy some of…

Kayakers Explore Alaska’s Newly Revealed Class V Gorge

Imagine being dropped off by a tiny bush plane into a remote wilderness, knowing you are about to brave the biggest challenge you have ever faced. Todd Wells did just that when he led an exploratory kayaking expedition into the heart of the Wrangell Mountains in Alaska. He and his team members were only able…

Securing Good Drinking Water: Footing the Bill to Fix Nature

By Daniel Moss

When a relentless sun parches the landscape and dries water sources to a dangerous and unhealthy trickle, who’s supposed to pay the repair bill?

Along a Desert River, A New Breed of Rancher

“I don’t know what I pump and I don’t care – and that’s crazy,” says Paul Schwennesen, a fit, energetic rancher in his late thirties who might outcompete Clint Eastwood for most handsome cowboy. On his modest-size ranch, the Double Check, located in the lower San Pedro River Valley of southeastern Arizona, Schwennesen raises cows…

Togo Slippery Frogs Feared Extinct; Found Living in Hidden Waterfall in Africa

Recent decades have not been kind to amphibian populations throughout the world. As amphibian declines and extinctions keep escalating at an unprecedented rate, it comes as a breath of fresh air when something is discovered that was feared to be lost forever.

#BioBlitz2016 Takeaway: How Geology Shapes Nature in Washington, D.C.

To know how the U.S. national capital area was created geographically — the basic structures formed by millions of years of Earth’s dynamics — is to better understand not only why certain species of plants and animals flourish there, but also why they (and Washington. D.C.) are there at all. Ford Cochran, a professor of geology and environmental science,…

Lessons on Fish Migration Crucial for Protecting Communities, Livelihoods and Food

By Giulio Boccaletti, Global Managing Director for Water at The Nature Conservancy and Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy One day in 2014 a female eel set off from Nova Scotia on a long and hazardous journey to her spawning grounds. This was no ordinary eel.  Scientists had released her with…

Fish Run Through It: The Importance of Maintaining and Reconnecting Free-Flowing Rivers

By Jeff Opperman, Director and Lead Scientist, Great Rivers Program, The Nature Conservancy Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.  – Norman Maclean This sparse sentence by Norman Maclean comprises some of the most beautiful words written about rivers in the English language. It captures how rivers serve as living…

Searching for the Pure Life in Paradise

Costa Rica is one of the world’s most eco-conscious countries, but it still has issues to deal with. How well can it live up to its motto of supporting a “Pura Vida”?

Deeper Grand Canyon, More Communal Colorado River Revealed in New Online Film

By Jeremy Monroe, Freshwaters Illustrated Photos by David Herasimtschuk In the arid Southwest, water is life… and the Colorado River is the artery that feeds communities and agricultural economies throughout the region. Yet, a little-known fact is that many of us who rely on the Colorado River’s water actually live outside of its natural watershed…