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Lake Suwa’s Shinto Legend and the Oldest Lake Ice Record on Earth: What It Tells Us About Climate Change and Variability

By Lisa Borre Shinto priests observing an ancient legend recorded ice freeze dates on Lake Suwa in Japan starting in the 15th Century. On the other side of the world, a local merchant began a tradition of recording ice thaw events on the Torne River in Finland in the 17th century. Both traditions continue to…

Wetland Revival: Using impact investment to restore nature

 Conservation interests and agencies gathered along the Murray River in Australia earlier this month to witness the return of water to a wetland system that now rarely receives floodwater from the river, due to construction of large water-storage reservoirs built upstream that capture the river’s flow and sends it to irrigated farms.   With the twist…

Plastics Found in One of Hawaii’s Most Remote Streams

Adventure Scientists for the Global Microplastics Initiative reach the most remote corners of the globe to help us understand the extent of plastic pollution worldwide. Collecting freshwater samples will provide critical data that can identify sources of microplastics in order to eliminate their introduction into the world’s water supply. Christian Shaw and Céline Jennsion of Plastic Tides are long-time ASC adventurers and…

Film Reveals Oregon’s Dirty Logging Secrets

By Natalie Bennon, Pacific Rivers If you’ve ever been to Oregon, you probably think of us as a green state – a utopia filled with people who recycle, ride bicycles, and hike and fish in healthy forests filled with clear streams. But when it comes to our forests and rivers, how real is that reputation?…

America’s Ten Most Endangered Rivers of 2016

American Rivers is sounding the alarm about rivers and clean water with its annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® report. Dried up rivers…collapsing ecosystems…dwindling water supplies for farms and cities: the 2016 report highlights how outdated water management is threatening rivers and communities from the east coast to the west coast. In the Southeast’s Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river…

From an Atlantic Victory to a Gulf Protest

Proposed Atlantic Drilling has gone the way of the Keystone Pipeline – bad ideas whose time has passed. President Obama’s decision to cancel his own proposed lease sales for oil and gas along the Southeast Atlantic coast on March 15 was a clear victory for grassroots activism up and down the eastern seaboard. Seaweed (marine…

Why Transparency With Fertilizer Management Tools Will Benefit Water Quality

By Suzy Friedman, director of sustainable agriculture at Environmental Defense Fund By 2050, we will have 2 billion more people on Earth. They will all need to eat. They will all need water. Feeding the planet sustainably is a huge challenge, since food production can have negative environmental impacts such as decreased water quality and air…

Changing the Course of our Freshwater Future

By Sandra Postel, Val Fishman and Todd Reeve We’ll cut right to the chase. We’re building a water stewardship movement, and we hope you’ll join us. Some 170,000 people and 22 companies already have. We have restored billions of gallons of water to depleted rivers and wetlands, and with your help, we can restore many…

Coho Salmon Virtually ‘Swim’ Across Frank Lloyd Wright Building

Last night, just as darkness fell, the SF Projection Department and Turtle Island Restoration Network’s Salmon Protection And Watershed Network (SPAWN) met in front of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural masterpiece – the Marin County Civic Center. The buildings oval shaped windows and unique triangle spire, and historic landmark status coupled with the important legal and…

Chasing Beaver at the End of the World

I’ve found my way to the end of the world, or more precisely Ushuaia on the southern tip of Tierra del Fuego. I’m most interested in seeing some of its most recent immigrants, the Canadian beavers (Castor canadensis).

Water Risks are Growing; Here’s a Tool to Help Us Prepare

Earlier this month, the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, released its annual risk assessment, which looks across the spectrum of threats to society and ranks them. This year, it declared water crises to be the top global risk to society over the next decade. Just behind water crises were the failure to adapt to…

Lower Zambezi is World’s First Carbon Neutral National Park

As world leaders deliberate the best path to take towards a carbon free energy future, a remote national park on the banks of the Zambezi River in Zambia is leading the way in reducing its reliance on fossil fuels. The Lower Zambezi National Park has become the world’s first national park to achieve a carbon…

Exploring Water, Cities, Climate, and Music in India With DJ Spooky

How do we make a portrait of a rapidly evolving world with music? That’s a question I’m asking myself throughout this journey.

Skadar Lake – Joining Forces to Save the Last Breeding Colony of Dalmatian Pelicans in Montenegro

Since the 17th century, 80% of the Dalmatian Pelican’s breeding sites have disappeared, but efforts in Montenegro’s Lake Skadar aim to protect and stabilize its population.

Does Jakarta Have any Viable Options to Defend Itself From Ocean Inundation?

JAKARTA, Indonesia–Walking along the wall that protects north Jakarta from the sea, it is impossible to ignore the enormity–and immediacy–of water-related issues that this megacity faces. The city’s current plan of action, outlined by Wendy Koch in a recent article entitled, “Could a Titanic Seawall Save this Quickly Sinking City?,” is widely criticized as being…