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Togo Slippery Frogs Feared Extinct; Found Living in Hidden Waterfall in Africa

Recent decades have not been kind to amphibian populations throughout the world. As amphibian declines and extinctions keep escalating at an unprecedented rate, it comes as a breath of fresh air when something is discovered that was feared to be lost forever.

#BioBlitz2016 Takeaway: How Geology Shapes Nature in Washington, D.C.

To know how the U.S. national capital area was created geographically — the basic structures formed by millions of years of Earth’s dynamics — is to better understand not only why certain species of plants and animals flourish there, but also why they (and Washington. D.C.) are there at all. Ford Cochran, a professor of geology and environmental science,…

Lessons on Fish Migration Crucial for Protecting Communities, Livelihoods and Food

By Giulio Boccaletti, Global Managing Director for Water at The Nature Conservancy and Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director for Oceans at The Nature Conservancy One day in 2014 a female eel set off from Nova Scotia on a long and hazardous journey to her spawning grounds. This was no ordinary eel.  Scientists had released her with…

Fish Run Through It: The Importance of Maintaining and Reconnecting Free-Flowing Rivers

By Jeff Opperman, Director and Lead Scientist, Great Rivers Program, The Nature Conservancy Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.  – Norman Maclean This sparse sentence by Norman Maclean comprises some of the most beautiful words written about rivers in the English language. It captures how rivers serve as living…

Searching for the Pure Life in Paradise

Costa Rica is one of the world’s most eco-conscious countries, but it still has issues to deal with. How well can it live up to its motto of supporting a “Pura Vida”?

Deeper Grand Canyon, More Communal Colorado River Revealed in New Online Film

By Jeremy Monroe, Freshwaters Illustrated Photos by David Herasimtschuk In the arid Southwest, water is life… and the Colorado River is the artery that feeds communities and agricultural economies throughout the region. Yet, a little-known fact is that many of us who rely on the Colorado River’s water actually live outside of its natural watershed…

Lake Suwa’s Shinto Legend and the Oldest Lake Ice Record on Earth: What It Tells Us About Climate Change and Variability

By Lisa Borre Shinto priests observing an ancient legend recorded ice freeze dates on Lake Suwa in Japan starting in the 15th Century. On the other side of the world, a local merchant began a tradition of recording ice thaw events on the Torne River in Finland in the 17th century. Both traditions continue to…

Wetland Revival: Using impact investment to restore nature

 Conservation interests and agencies gathered along the Murray River in Australia earlier this month to witness the return of water to a wetland system that now rarely receives floodwater from the river, due to construction of large water-storage reservoirs built upstream that capture the river’s flow and sends it to irrigated farms.   With the twist…

Plastics Found in One of Hawaii’s Most Remote Streams

Adventure Scientists for the Global Microplastics Initiative reach the most remote corners of the globe to help us understand the extent of plastic pollution worldwide. Collecting freshwater samples will provide critical data that can identify sources of microplastics in order to eliminate their introduction into the world’s water supply. Christian Shaw and Céline Jennsion of Plastic Tides are long-time ASC adventurers and…

Film Reveals Oregon’s Dirty Logging Secrets

By Natalie Bennon, Pacific Rivers If you’ve ever been to Oregon, you probably think of us as a green state – a utopia filled with people who recycle, ride bicycles, and hike and fish in healthy forests filled with clear streams. But when it comes to our forests and rivers, how real is that reputation?…

America’s Ten Most Endangered Rivers of 2016

American Rivers is sounding the alarm about rivers and clean water with its annual America’s Most Endangered Rivers® report. Dried up rivers…collapsing ecosystems…dwindling water supplies for farms and cities: the 2016 report highlights how outdated water management is threatening rivers and communities from the east coast to the west coast. In the Southeast’s Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river…

From an Atlantic Victory to a Gulf Protest

Proposed Atlantic Drilling has gone the way of the Keystone Pipeline – bad ideas whose time has passed. President Obama’s decision to cancel his own proposed lease sales for oil and gas along the Southeast Atlantic coast on March 15 was a clear victory for grassroots activism up and down the eastern seaboard. Seaweed (marine…

Why Transparency With Fertilizer Management Tools Will Benefit Water Quality

By Suzy Friedman, director of sustainable agriculture at Environmental Defense Fund By 2050, we will have 2 billion more people on Earth. They will all need to eat. They will all need water. Feeding the planet sustainably is a huge challenge, since food production can have negative environmental impacts such as decreased water quality and air…

Changing the Course of our Freshwater Future

By Sandra Postel, Val Fishman and Todd Reeve We’ll cut right to the chase. We’re building a water stewardship movement, and we hope you’ll join us. Some 170,000 people and 22 companies already have. We have restored billions of gallons of water to depleted rivers and wetlands, and with your help, we can restore many…

Coho Salmon Virtually ‘Swim’ Across Frank Lloyd Wright Building

Last night, just as darkness fell, the SF Projection Department and Turtle Island Restoration Network’s Salmon Protection And Watershed Network (SPAWN) met in front of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural masterpiece – the Marin County Civic Center. The buildings oval shaped windows and unique triangle spire, and historic landmark status coupled with the important legal and…