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Mysterious New Poison Dart Frog Found; Is Size of Fingernail

A new species of bright-orange, fingernail-size frog found in a Panama rain forest is unlike any of its relatives, scientists say.

Traditional Fishing With Poison Deployed for Science

By Emma Marris

A traditional fishing technique has been incorporated into a scientific study of the fish of the Amazon basin.

Rivers Need a Thorough Health Exam

Rivers are the blue arteries of the Earth. Their flows deliver sediment and nutrients to floodplains, deltas and coastal zones, some of the most biologically productive ecosystems on the planet.  They connect and sustain the web of life. So it might be surprising that globally we don’t systematically monitor their health.  Imagine damming and diverting…

117 Million Lakes Found in Latest World Count

Using satellite photos and computerized mapping technologies, an international research team counted all of the lakes on Earth. They found about 117 million lakes, covering almost four percent of the world’s land surface, not counting the glaciers on Greenland and Antarctica, according to a new study. It is the first time the world’s lakes have been…

With 38% of Global Shale Gas Located in Regions of Water Stress, More Oversight of Fracking is Urgently Needed

As more data emerge, shale gas increasingly appears to be in the cross-hairs of the water-energy nexus, and far too little is being done to defuse impending conflicts. While hydraulic fracturing (or “fracking”), the process used to unleash natural gas from shale deposits, has raised serious concerns about groundwater contamination, less attention has been given…

Mystery Solved: How Archerfish Shoot Water at Prey With Stunning Precision

Archerfish, which use water jets to take down prey, are much more skilled and sophisticated target shooters than thought, a new study says.

Rare Siamese Crocodiles Released as Ambassadors for Laotian Wetland

Seventeen Critically Endangered juvenile Siamese crocodiles have been released into into a protected wetland in Laos, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) announced today. The Siamese crocodile is named Freshwater Species of the Week for its critical role in the fragile Xe Champhone and other wetlands in Southeast Asia. Saving the species from the brink of extinction in the wild and restoring its habitat will help ensure a healthy environment and create socio-economic opportunities for the people who depend on the wetlands.

Artist Anne Neely Evokes the Mystery and Magic of Water

Motivated by concern over growing threats to the world of water, Boston-area artist Anne Neely undertook a decade-long search to understand and interpret what is happening to rivers, lakes, oceans, glaciers and aquifers. “I approach painting by asking questions, just as a scientist does,” Neely writes in Water Stories, the companion book to the exhibit…

#Okavango14: Out There …

Poling 10,000 years back in time.

What’s a Fishing Spider? Behind the Arachnid Trending on Facebook

Freshwater Species of the Week: Fishing Spider

When the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources posted on its Facebook page that giant fishing spiders had been spotted around the state the news was shared more than 10,000 times. More than 2,000 comments were received, including from people posting their own images of the arachnids. Many posters expressed concern and abhorrence. But these are amazing animals with super powers, able to walk or sail with the wind on water, and they can haul up aquatic animals five times their weight.

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.

The Last Spring: Protecting Florida’s Manatees

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic News Watch blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text by iLCP Fellow and Founder Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier Photos by iLCP Fellow Paul Nicklen One of the things I love…

Young Farmers in the Western U. S. Adapt to a Water-Scarce Future

Sipping raw, whole, grass-fed milk is a bit like tasting fine wine: a familiar experience, but much more special. That was my feeling when I drank a glass this week from De Smet Dairy in Bosque Farms, New Mexico, a small town nestled in the middle Rio Grande Valley. With his wife Erica, Mike De…

Female Turtles “Talk” to Their Hatchlings, Scientists Discover

New research finds that female giant South American river turtles “talk” to their hatchlings.

Public Helps Restore Flows to Critically Depleted Rivers

Change the Course, a water restoration movement led by National Geographic Fellow Sandra Postel, has encouraged some 70,000 people to cut their water footprint and restored 2 billion gallons of water to the Colorado River Basin. The model will be presented at this year’s Stockholm Water Symposium during World Water Week.