Sailing Halfway Around the World to Find Our Oldest Ancestors

The crew of the voyaging canoe, Hōkūle’a, arrive in Mossel Bay, South Africa, and reflect on the immense significance of this location, as a halfway point of the Worldwide Voyage and as a bridge that connects the genealogy of all people on Earth.

What Do Voyagers Do While Waiting for Good Weather?

To minimize the likelihood of trouble at sea, our voyaging leaders pay extra close attention to the weather, ensuring that we only sail when the wind is favorable. As a result, there are often long stretches of time where we must wait patiently in port for the weather to shift. This, however, does not mean that we wait idly.

Witnessing the “Miracle” of iSimangaliso

On this Worldwide Voyage, we have learned to flexible in ALL things, but especially with timing. However, one thing that we definitely did not want to miss out on was the opportunity to visit the beautiful iSimangaliso Wetland Park in the KwaZulu-Natal region of South Africa.

What Does A Polynesian Canoe Mean to a South African?

Several days ago, Hōkūle’a made landfall at Richards Bay, South Africa. This is the first of several stops in the country where so many significant stories of the Worldwide Voyage will be told. Upon arrival, Hōkūle’a crew were greeted by community members of all different backgrounds. Among those who greeted the crew was Romeo Njabulo, a young Zulu man and member of the Roving Reporters.

Finding Ubuntu: Hawaiian Voyagers in South Africa

The crewmembers aboard the voyaging canoe, Hōkūle’a, are a few days from reaching South Africa on their Worldwide Voyage. In preparing for this leg of the voyage, the concept of “ubuntu” kept coming up as a foundational element of South African culture. We learned that “ubuntu” is a Zulu word that serves as a guiding belief for societal values in the country. But to truly understand the depth and beauty of this word, we know that we must experience it first-hand, much like we do with “aloha” back home.

The Borobudur Temple Ship: Bringing a Memory Back to Life

Preserved in the delicate carvings of the temple’s stone, a ship serves as inspiration to revive deep cultural memories and pride.

Dying Wishes From One of the Last Remaining Micronesian Master Navigators

The sacred knowledge of navigating by the stars has been passed down for many generations in Micronesia. Today, with the convenience of modern instruments and technology, only a handful of people still retain this precious knowledge. These “Master Navigators” exist within a paradox where convenience often trumps custom and the gap between traditional and modern grows exponential wider with time. Nearing the end of his life, one Master Navigator has an important message for all those who are willing to listen…

Dust and Dancing to Celebrate Indigenous Australia

Every two years, the Laura Aboriginal Dance Festival in Australia brings together people for a spectacle of sights, sounds, and dust.

Protecting the Sea, Strengthening People, and Nursing Sea Turtles Back to Health

“It’s not just about protecting our land and sea. What we do also strengthens our people to stand up and stand together. That’s the biggest thing for us.”

The Foundations of our Forests

Louise Egerton-Warburton, Ph.D. Conservation Scientist, Soil and Microbial Ecology, Chicago Botanic Garden Characterized by warm temperatures, high rainfall and a 365-day growing season, tropical rainforests are an unparalleled display of biodiversity. These impressive and unique ecosystems provide resources we need – from shelter to medicines to food – while releasing oxygen, cycling and filtering water, and…

Biking With Fresh Air, the Open Road, and an Awful Lot of Roadkill

Julie Hotz is biking from L.A. to Montana, then hiking to the Pacific Coast, recording every bit of roadkill she sees. It’s important information, and it doesn’t come free.

Taking the Worldwide Voyage Underwater in Australia

The Great Barrier Reef spans more than 1,400 miles and is considered one of the best-preserved marine sites on Earth. Naturally, we needed to see this for ourselves. We needed to take the voyage underwater.

Braving the Tasman Sea on a Hawaiian Canoe

For the first time in her 40-year history, the traditional voyaging canoe Hōkūleʻa departs Polynesia into the Tasman Sea and on toward Australia.

Inspiring Words From an Award-Winning Hawaiian Navigator

“There are people saying that going around the world on Hōkūleʻa is too dangerous; there is too much risk. The great risk of our time is not sailing Hōkūleʻa. The great risk of our time is ignorance, apathy, and inaction.”

Hawaiian Canoe Hōkūleʻa Sets Sail for Sydney Guided by Ancient Navigation

Hawaii’s iconic voyaging canoe ventures outside of the Pacific Ocean for the first time as the Worldwide Voyage continues on to new horizons.