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Category archives for Activism

Disappearing Landscapes in Louisiana: When Google Maps Can’t Catch Up

The America I have seen over the past year is creative, inspiring, and not ready to surrender itself to the rising seas.

Karoo Stories: Narratives from Gariep and Van der Kloof dams

Farmworkers and farmers share their experiences of working and living near Gariep and Van der Kloof dams on the Orange River.

Take a Virtual Visit to the US-Mexico Border

With the Trump administration gearing up to expand border wall construction on the U.S.-Mexico border, it is more important than ever to gain a clearer picture of the land and people of this region, and the enduring environmental and human costs of a border policy focused on walls.
A new project, Embattled Borderlands, released today, allows viewers to take a virtual visit to this remote region, to hear the voices of its birds and frogs; to see the faces of its elusive cats and endearing reptiles; to experience its vast landscapes and starry skies; and to understand the plight of its most vulnerable human residents.

1Frame4Nature | Michel Roggo

I was sitting lazily in front of our summer house in Swedish Lapland, enjoying the vacations. And then there was this SMS, sent by a good friend, working for the WWF Switzerland: Hydro power project on the Sense river: what do you think about that?

Sense River? A hydroelectric power plant in it? In the most beautiful Swiss river? I have to admit that my view about all that is perhaps a bit personal … But this is the river I learned to swim in as a little boy, later it was the river I started fly fishing. And most important: it is the last major river in Switzerland without any single dam or hydro electric plant.

In Search of a Leadbeater’s Possum

by Erika Zambello, based on an article by Alex Mullarky. Alex Mullarky was in the depths of Australia’s Toolangi Forest, part of a citizen science group  sweeping the inky shadows with headlamps and infrared cameras. They spotted sleeping birds, a greater glider, a mountain brushtail possum, but their eyes were constantly looking for one, specific species: a Leadbeater’s Possum.…

Storytelling in a Slum’s Silicon Valley

“We have a different kind of Silicon Valley here,” Nawneet Ranjan explains. Founder of the Dharavi Diary: Slum and Rural Innovation Project, Ranjan tells how his students use storytelling, technology, and the power of their diversity to raise awareness and develop solutions for issues facing the Dharavi slum community in Mumbai, India.

A Harmonious Resistance Creates Global Solidarity for Standing Rock

For more than a year, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has been at war with natural gas’s close comrade, Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), over the development of the controversial $3.8 billion Dakota Access Pipeline, which has frequently been referred to as “DAPL.” (Many resistance members call it “the Black Snake.”) The approved project designs developed by…

Help Me Define (Bio)Diversity

What does diversity mean to you? Is it important?

Big Cat Week Spirit Comes to a Big Apple School

Happy Big Cat Week! In the spirit of celebration, Explorers-in-Residence Dereck and Beverly Joubert just paid a special visit to students at P.S. 205 the Fiorello Laguardia School, a National Geographic Big Cats Initiative Sister School in the Bronx.

Unleashing the Wild Soul of the Cat

Domestic cats outnumber big cats more than 600 to 1. Can our love of kitties be the key to saving the kings?

1Frame4Nature | Jasper Doest

The iconic White Stork is a very adaptable, opportunistic species. Since the mid-1980s, increasing numbers of White Stork have chosen to stay on the European continent all year rather than migrate to Africa in winter. These resident birds rely almost exclusively on the guaranteed, abundant food supply from landfill sites throughout the year.

How to Use the Ocean Without Using it Up

This TED talk was developed while I was in residence at TED headquarters in New York City. The transcript is below. _______________ When I was five, my parents took me from Brooklyn, NY to Key West, Florida. They taught me to swim, and showed me my first a coral reef. I feel completely in love…

Two Days at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Located on the Florida Panhandle, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) borders encompass over 245,000 acres, including Apalachicola Bay, wildlife…

Why the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reflects Patriotism

By Saleem H. Ali, Cristina Archer, Jeremy Firestone On December 2, 1970, Republican President Richard Nixon established the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This was the world’s first major government organization dedicated to ameliorating the environmental condition of its citizens. The world marveled at how the United States was able to address pollution concerns that…

Borders, Walls, and the Future of Wildlife in a World of Barriers

There have always been natural obstacles to the movement of plants and animals: climate, mountain ranges, oceans, but the pace of change with these obstructions offers a chance to adapt and therefore often ignites the flames of natural diversity. Human-wrought barriers however, whether they are suburban roads or international border walls, tend to have the opposite effect: they are sudden, defy nature’s logic and though some species may see benefits, the overall impact erodes biological diversity.