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Category archives for Animals

Drones Can Curb Poaching, But They’re Much Costlier Than Alternatives

Before large amounts of conservation dollars are thrown at drone technologies, another question must be asked: How effective are they at stopping poaching of animals other than iconic megafauna like elephants and rhinos?

Santa Barbara Oil Spill: What Will We Learn?

A month ago, KPPC journalist Sanden Totten joined me on the Ocean Conservation Society boat during one of our regular marine mammal surveys that my research team and I conduct off Southern California. He wanted to discuss and observe first hand the increasing presence of skin lesions and physical deformities that are plaguing common bottlenose…

Before Today, I Thought You Were Dead: Video Messages Cross a Border When Families Can’t

In the final episode of Through the Prides, family members receive video messages across the border and must decide whether to risk all on the dangerous walk across Kruger National Park.

Winter in the Subantarctic: A Short Film

In 2013 the National Geographic Society Committee for Research and Exploration funded our expedition to Subantarctic Antipodes Island. Winter in the Subantarctic is a short film (2015) recorded on that expedition.

See Highlights From Hawai‘i Volcanoes BioBlitz, Discover Next Year’s Location

[This text is from an official press release.] HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Hawaii (May 20, 2015)—After two intensive days of exploration and documentation, the Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park BioBlitz held on May 15 and 16, 2015, captured a vivid snapshot of the unique plant and animal biodiversity in the park. The event brought together more…

Five years after Deepwater Horizon

By Kat Diersen, The Society for Conservation Biology’s North America Policy Program Five years ago today, just before dawn, I was kneeling in the pristine white sand of a beach in the Florida panhandle, digging up a loggerhead sea turtle nest.  Normally this sort of thing is discouraged. After all, most sea turtles are protected…

ELEPHANT CONSERVATION OUTSIDE THE BOX

First Installment   In December, 1991, my boyfriend and I decided to spend a year traveling in Africa in between graduate degrees. But after being seduced by Africa, we never left. And from there, boyfriend became husband, and elephants the subject of my scientific career. While working for the Namibian government in the Caprivi region…

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #23

“Life in us is like the water in a river.” Henry David Thoreau The Okavango is the beating heart of Africa, home to an estimated 50% of the world’s elephants, most of the world’s hippo, and crucial populations of many other keystone species. There is no wilder place on earth: this is the Africa of…

A First Impression of Montserrat, from Below the Surface

Dispatch from the field, by Waitt Institute Science Manager Andy Estep: If you’re a geology nerd like me, hearing of Montserrat makes you think “the Emerald Isle of the Caribbean, precariously perched on the Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc along the eastern subduction zone of the Caribbean plate.” The incredible volcanology that has been forming and shaping…

Shedd partners to keep species SAFE

Shedd Aquarium has been a safe haven for endangered species for more than 40 years. From the earliest days of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, Shedd – along with local partners the Chicago Zoological Society’s Brookfield Zoo and Lincoln Park Zoo — have made a commitment to conserve threatened and endangered species within our…

8 Photos of Spring Awakening on the Great Plains

“In my two months of adventure here on the prairie, this ferruginous hawk flying into the sunrise was probably the most inspirational and memorable moment of them all,” says photographer Elaine Kennedy.

Story of One of Africa’s Greatest Animal Trackers

In the fourth episode of Through the Prides, Wilson Masiya tells us about his childhood hunting for survival, and his work guiding people safely through the wilds of Kruger National Park on foot.

The Good and The Bad for Atlantic Menhaden

Co-authored by Elizabeth Brown On May 5th the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission met to make pivotal decisions about the management of Atlantic Menhaden – arguably one of the most important fish in the sea. Two keys decisions were up for discussion: 1.) What to set the Atlantic Menhaden catch limit at. Or, in other words,…

Signs of spring in the Kispiox Valley

SMITHERS, BC —  It’s springtime here in the Kispiox Valley. That means steelhead trout coming up to spawn and smolt (juvenile salmon) swimming downstream and out to the ocean. It also means the arrival of the sandhill cranes as they journey further north to Alaska. They are easy to spot and hear as they fly above…

Surge in Fish 2.0 Applications is Good News for Oceans, Communities and Investors

When I started Fish 2.0, many investors, foundations, and even seafood experts said it would be difficult to get more than 50 entries in a competition for sustainable seafood businesses. They were not seeing many innovative seafood businesses, and they believed most of those they did see were not looking for investment. The inaugural competition…