National Geographic

VOICES Voices Icon Ideas and Insight From Explorers

Menu

Category archives for Animals

Rock Art Helps Reveal Elk May Have Roamed Los Angeles

What if Los Angeles’ largest native herbivore already went extinct and we had no idea? What if long-dead native people were the ones who could set the record straight? Last year I was in the field  researching California’s native Chumash culture and rock art through the help of a National Geographic Young Explorers Grant. Not far from…

Fishing for Our Future With Lures From the Past

Nahaku Kalei explains more about sustainable fish-eating and the data being gathered by the Worldwide Voyage.

In Africa, Tracker Dogs Join War Against Elephant Poachers

MANYARA RANCH, Tanzania—On October 14, tracker dogs led game scouts to a group of armed poachers who were on the run after shooting and killing a well-known old elephant bull just outside Tarangire National Park. This was the latest in a string of successes by Tanzania’s tracker dogs, which are proving to be an effective…

In Kenya, Justice Catches Up With Elephant Poacher

An elephant poacher in Kenya is finally behind bars, thanks to a local magistrate and coordination between the wildlife authority and two conservation partners. In late 2013, community game scouts undertaking an anti-poaching patrol near world-renowned Amboseli National Park in southern Kenya came across a fresh elephant carcass. Not surprisingly, the elephant’s two tusks were…

November 16, 2014: Speed Climb 3,000 Foot Walls, Meet the Darwin of NYC’s Rodent World and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they set a speed record on El Capitan, prosecute poaching kingpins, share survival tips for extreme weather, dig up clues on ancient tsunamis to study for future risk, hold our breath to survive a surfing disaster, call the Malagasy military for an airlift, understand the evolution of New York’s rats, and mourn the Sherpa guides and porters lost on Everest.

TODAY: Chat With National Geographic Explorer Enric Sala

Do you ever wonder what it’s like to be a National Geographic Explorer? Here’s your chance to connect directly with someone who has ventured to unexplored areas, discovered previously unknown life forms, taken stunning photographs, and put it all to work to help protect some of the last wild places on Earth. From the Russian Arctic to…

Are Marine Protected Areas in the Right Places to Protect People, or Just Nature?

Mark Spalding, senior marine scientist, The Nature Conservancy I’m at the World Parks Congress, a-once-a-decade global meeting of scientists, protected area managers and other experts to focus on the state and future of national parks and nature reserves. There’s so much to talk about here—new science and technologies to monitor parks, ways to engage local…

The Flying Classroom Comes to Palau

Barrington Irving brings the Flying Classroom to Palau to dive its magnificent waters… and harvest water snake venom!

Hard-Working Hands Span Cultures and Generations to Come Together for Big Cat Conservation

Education is the foundation for positive change, and every year the National Geographic Student Expeditions takes groups of high school students from around the world to beautiful places on quests for both knowledge and skills. The trips also serve as a way to help various developing communities, and this year two groups of students made…

Gabon Announces Protection of 23 Percent of Its Waters

The announcement by President Ali Bongo Ondimba of Gabon means that whales, sharks, turtles, rays, and countless other marine species in jeopardy from industrialization and overfishing will now have a blue haven on the West African coast.

The Peel River Watershed: The Endangered Wilderness of Canada’s Yukon

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Peter Mather, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers. From the front seat of our Cessna 172, the…

Shutting Down the Manta Trade

This article is brought to you by the International League of Conservation Photographers (iLCP). Read our other articles on the National Geographic Voices blog featuring the work of our iLCP Fellow Photographers all around the world. Text and photos by Paul Hilton, Fellow at the International League of Conservation Photographers.  Twice in a one-week on the Indonesia island of…

November 9, 2014: Rescue Storm Survivors from Everest, Test an Elephant’s Memory and More

This week on National Geographic Weekend radio, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they save climbers from a disaster on Everest, devote one day of each week to helping others, take selfies with orangutans, assign land and oceans for protection, never forget elephants, travel through North Korea, go to war with chimpanzees, and hijack the minds of the animals they’re living inside.

Turtle Island Helps Gain International Protections for a Record Number of Sharks

This week, Turtle Island has been in Quito, Ecuador for the 11th meeting of the United Nation’s Conference of Parties of the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). This important event brings together nations, nonprofits, scientists and experts to discuss the conservation of migrating species, like sharks, that recognize no…

The Prairie: Looking Beneath the Surface

Laura Hitt explores the sublime and the saddening aspects of life on the American Prairie Reserve.