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Category archives for Animals

In Pursuit of Illegal Loggers in India

In India in a rural area along the border with Bangladesh, Tripp Burwell of the Society for Conservation Biology was helping local villagers learn about forest conservation when they heard the sounds of illegal loggers at work. Pursuit of the poachers resulted in an opportunity to apprehend and talk with the interlopers from a neighboring village, and…

Blue Halo Initiative Expands to Montserrat and Curaçao!

VERY EXCITING NEWS! The Waitt Institute has expanded its Blue Halo Initiative to Montserrat and Curaçao, building on the recent success in Barbuda. The new partnerships with these two innovative island governments and communities will help envision, design, and implement sustainable ocean policies for their waters. With the launches of Blue Halo Montserrat and Blue…

A Bat-tastic Beginning for 2015!

After catching bats all night, I crawled into my tent at 11:59 PM and counted down to the New Year, listening to lions call in the distance and a hyena whooping nearby …

Bee With No Stripes Discovered in Kenya

It has a black head and a bright orange body, and velociraptor-like claws on its hind legs. It lives underground, not in a hive. And it lives by itself, instead of in the huge colonies we’re used to. Here’s the story of the discovery of the world’s newest-known bee. Bee-ing There The hot, dusty bush and deserts…

February 22, 2015: Discovering AIDS’ Animal Roots and Discovering Morocco’s Ancient Markets

This week on National Geographic Weekend, join host Boyd Matson and his guests as they dangle from a hot air balloon over pristine forest, walk from Russia across Australia, protect Italy’s wildlife in a national park, share a language with chimpanzees, document Alberta’s tar sands, track the evolution of HIV, climb China’s mountains and bird watch, visit Morocco’s ancient bazaars, and ski New England’s unusually deep powder.

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Managing Marine Reserves

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3   Part 4 It is a simple diagram, and Cristen Don and Stacy Galleher laugh wryly as they show us. Four overlapping circles represent their team’s responsibilities: “Policy and Administration (1 staff),” “Ecological Monitoring (2.5 staff),” “Human Dimensions Monitoring (1 staff),”…

The Karoo Predator Project: Mitigating the human-wildlife conflict

Farmers, scientists and photographers are working together in South Africa’s Karoo to look for ways to ease the tense relationship between farming herds and natural predators.

Fighting Back Lionfish for Invasive Species Awareness Week

In honor of Invasive Species Awareness Week, see how Floridians are working to control invasive lionfish and put them to good use.

Using Science to Empower Communities and Improve Marine Protected Areas in East Africa

By Jennifer O’Leary and Arthur Tuda When you think about East Africa, probably the first images that emerge are of large terrestrial animals like elephants and lions. Many people don’t know that East Africa has vibrant marine fishing communities and hundreds of miles of coral reefs. In a typical morning, you watch the sun rise…

Oracle Visits AKTF’s Build-A-Boma Project in Maasai Mara

  The sun had risen less than an hour before, yet Anne and the rest of us at the Anne K. Taylor Fund were gathered on an earthen airstrip at the edge of Maasai Mara National Reserve. Our Anti-Poaching Team leaned coolly against their truck, its green paint matching their olive fatigues. I and the…

Is “Extinct” Forever? Central Asia’s Caspian Tiger Traverses the Comeback Trail

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I imagine a tiger. He’ll move through the forest and his days Leaving his traces on the mud banks Of a river whose name he doesn’t know. In his world there are no names or past Or future, only the certainty of now. —Jorge Luis Borges, The Other Tiger In reeds tinged red in the…

Poachers of Pangolins

The pangolin is the world’s most highly-traded mammal, with more than a million being poached from the wild over the last decade, but most people have are not aware such an animal even exists. iLCP Fellow Paul Hilton urges us to pay attention to the decimation of the pangolin, before it is too late.

Bats Big and Small in the World’s Oldest Desert

Vying with desert elephants for a spot at waterholes at night, NG Young Explorer Grantee Theresa Laverty begins her search for insect-eating bats along northwestern Namibia’s dry riverbeds.

A Day in the Life of a Researcher in Search of Rats

The last twenty-four hours on Fernando de Noronha have been non-stop, non-sleep, and action filled, and not just because it’s been Carnival in Brazil.

Fair Trade Writes New Chapter In Story of Tuna

  Tuna is the second most popular seafood in the United States, yet for most Americans, it’s a non-descript protein puck that inevitably gets mixed with mayonnaise and celery. Maybe the tuna in that can came from the Philippines, or Micronesia? Perhaps it was caught by a Japanese vessel and transferred to a processing plant…