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Category archives for Fish

Sushi Roulette: Is the Fish You Ordered the One You Got?

Have plans this summer to visit your favorite sushi restaurant? You might order spicy tuna roll. Or maybe salmon or halibut. But is the fish you selected the one you got? If you’re in Los Angeles or many other cities around the globe, it’s a flip of the coin. Scientists at Loyola Marymount University, the…

1Frame4Nature | A Vessel of Life in the Philippine Seas

Imagine a booming underwater powerhouse, overflowing with vibrant biodiversity; a vast, dynamic wonderland of adaptation in aquatic form. Primordial soup? Not quite–though coral reefs are themselves an irreplaceable vessel of life. From fish nurseries to coastline protection and pharmaceutical breakthroughs to diving meccas, coral reefs provide a multitude of ecological services and economic contributions. Awed by the endless infinity of life living upon life to degrees unimaginable to the naked eye, I count myself lucky to have spent time in these enchanting habitats in many parts of the world.

Food, Fuel, Medicine, Wrinkle Reducer: Algae Does It All

You know what there’s really plenty of in the sea? Algae. And I am in love with them. Most people envision algae as slimy, possibly toxic, green scum. But this diverse group of fast-growing aquatic plants is about to undergo an image makeover, and may soon seem flat-out glamorous. Algae got a lot of excited…

How the Safina Center is helping to save the seas this World Oceans Day (and every day)

The members of the Safina Center crew send out their World Oceans Day messages and discuss what they’re doing to help save the seas.

1Frame4Nature | Under the Mangrove Sea

The humble mangrove forest is one of the most biologically important ecosystems that border our oceans. They act as the skin of our coastlines, managing the energy exchange between land and sea; and provide vital ecosystem services such as waste treatment, habitat, food resource, and recreation.

I have been on many research expeditions throughout the Gulf of California, Mexico, where I study these ecosystems and photograph them in action: acting as a nursery for yellow snappers, hosting migratory birds after their long flight, and buffering coastlines against storms.

Climate, Oceans, the United Nations, and What’s Next

For many of us jaded New Yorkers, the United Nations is merely a reason that traffic is periodically terrible on the Upper East Side, when world leaders gather. Perhaps now, after the US Administration has announced it will take steps to pull the United States out of the UN’s Paris Agreement on climate change, we…

Why do we have a World Tuna Day?

By Shelley Dearhart One of the most incredible predators in our Ocean is in danger of being lost. Pacific Bluefin tuna populations have been in jeopardy for years and new allegations of illegal and overfishing activity by Japanese fleets create a dire need for conservation measures to be taken to protect this species. Populations have…

A Win for Both Nature and Fishermen in Mauritius

Last year, the Mauritian government, in partnership with local NGOs and Smartfish, led the first national octopus fishing closure for two months of the year. It went … swimmingly.

Misool bluewater shark baitball: A sign of conservation success in Raja Ampat, Indonesia

Photographer, filmmaker and conservationist Shawn Heinrichs documents new biodiversity, a sign of conservation success in Indonesia’s Misool Marine Reserve.

Entrepreneurs Shine a Light on Seafood Origins

Consumers who would never buy something generically labeled meat or cheese are often stuck at almost that level of information when it comes to seafood. The opaque origins and processing of many seafood products can hide a host of problems, including species fraud, illegal fishing, human rights abuses in the labor force, and pollution—as well…

A Fisherman’s Son Who Cannot Swim

Mayur, a young Koli fisherman’s son, never learned to swim because the beaches of Mumbai are too polluted. Few Koli youth want to follow their parent’s footsteps to be fishermen in Mumbai. The consumer demand for fish though is ever on the rise. Mayur teaches me to dig for clams and offers his perspective on Koli culture among shifting tides.

Oysters Built the East Coast. Now Entrepreneurs are Rebuilding the Oysters.

The East Coast was literally built on oysters. At the peak of their production as a food source, these shellfish were so plentiful from the Gulf Coast to New England that discarded shells were crushed and used to pave roads. Oysters kept bays and waterways clean—Chesapeake Bay residents didn’t need to treat or filter their…

The Grekos: A success story in the crackdown on illegal fishing

Investigative New York Times Reporter and Safina Center Fellow tells the tale of The Grekos, a case of an illegal fishing crackdown success story.

A Refuge Found for the Most Heavily Fished Shark?

We are seeing only large females and very small juveniles, suggesting that the waters of Tristan da Cunha might be a blue shark nursery ground with large females traveling here to give birth.

Montauk business launches crowdfunding campaign to fight seafood fraud with technology

Montauk-based sustainable seafood company Dock to Dish launches a crowdfunding campaign to upgrade their business with new technology that will boost their products’ traceability.