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Category archives for Animals

Saving Ugandan Lions One Radio Collar at a Time

Tagging along with Dr. Ludwig Siefert, team leader of the Uganda Carnivore Program, in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park, I learn what it takes to manage and care for wild lions in a region undergoing tremendous socio-economic change.

Nesting Instinct: When Birds Change (Genetically-Coded) Flight Plans

From northern Illinois to southern Europe, birds are feeling the effects of climate change. People are seeing new guests at backyard bird feeders, or their absence as insect pests hit crops. Chris Whelan, an ecologist at the University of Illinois at Chicago and co-editor of Why Birds Matter, has tracked these changes closely. Below, Whelan…

Carnivore Conservation: Preserving Africa’s Disappearing Lion Population

National Geographic Emerging Explorer Thandiwe Mweetwa on a mission to track down lions. This carnivore conservationist has dedicated her life to preserving Africa’s disappearing lion population.

“Otter-ly” Adorable Animal & Trainer Relationships for Valentine’s Day

At Shedd Aquarium, animal trainers celebrated Valentine’s Day by showing love to the special animals in our care. Five experts showcase the most rewarding part of their jobs, favorite memories, and what a typical day is like working with our animals. Whether its Nickel, a rescued green sea turtle, or Charlotte, a Magellanic penguin, these…

Journey to the Sea: Turtles Unite the Choroni + Chuao Hope Spot

By: Shilpi Chhotray, Mission Blue Communications Strategist February marks the beginning of sea turtle nesting season on the Venezuelan coastline. For anyone who has witnessed sea turtle hatchlings find their way to the ocean, you know these little marine creatures are up to an enormous challenge. Not only do they have to conquer several meters of…

Karoo Stories: When it rains, it pours

An introduction to my travels following the Orange River into the Karoo, a huge semi-arid area in South Africa. Drought, and the sudden easing of it, is on everyone’s minds in these parts.

1Frame4Nature | Amy Gulick

What YOU Can Do:  Care for Nature. Purchase sustainably sourced foods. –1Frame4Nature is a collection of images and stories from around the globe of your personal connection to nature. However small, when combined with the actions of others, your individual actions can impact real and tangible outcomes for the preservation of our planet. Submit your story now! iLCP…

Reserva Monte Mojino: Conservation on the Slopes of the Sierra Madre

A cactus flower blooming next to a lush fig tree, a desert tortoise resting beneath an elegant trogon perched in a mesquite: I first encountered these strange bedfellows when I visited the forest near Alamos in Sonora, Mexico, during the summer monsoon. It is here, along the slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental, that one…

Rescuing a Fierce Leopard: See What It Takes

What would you do if you came face-to-face with a 175 pound, agitated leopard? If you’re conservation power-couple Marlice and Rudie van Vuuren, you’ve been on the receiving end of such a scenario about 112 times.

Two Days at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve

As part of an ongoing project, Erika Zambello is visiting all National Estuarine Research Reserves in the continental United States. Established by NOAA, the sites work together toward long-term research, education and coastal stewardship. Located on the Florida Panhandle, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) borders encompass over 245,000 acres, including Apalachicola Bay, wildlife…

Reversing “Empty Forest Syndrome” in Southeast Asia

By Barney Long, Thomas Gray, Antony Lynam, Teak Seng, William Laurance, Lorraine Scotson, William Ripple Warning: The pictures in this story may be disturbing to some readers, especially young audiences. Reader discretion is advised. The diverse tropical forests of Southeast Asia are home to some of the most mysterious and beautiful wildlife species in the…

How Does the Great Wildebeest Migration Work?

  The original version of this story was published on the Timbuktu Travel website.   What makes a million wildebeest get up and move at once? What is the sense that triggers them to muster the energy to begin a 1000-kilometre trek—to somehow know that it’s the right thing to do? It’s mid March in the northern…

Borders, Walls, and the Future of Wildlife in a World of Barriers

There have always been natural obstacles to the movement of plants and animals: climate, mountain ranges, oceans, but the pace of change with these obstructions offers a chance to adapt and therefore often ignites the flames of natural diversity. Human-wrought barriers however, whether they are suburban roads or international border walls, tend to have the opposite effect: they are sudden, defy nature’s logic and though some species may see benefits, the overall impact erodes biological diversity.

1Frame4Nature | Jason Houston

iLCP Fellow Jason Houston’s 1Frame4Nature: In September 2016, as part of an ongoing Collaboration with Rare’s global fisheries program, Fish Forever, I spent almost a month in the San Miguel Bay, Philippines. For three of those weeks I lived with Rodel Bolaños, a life-long fisherman, and his family on Caringo Island.

Underwater photography and films advocate for ocean conservation

Documentary filmmaker Christine Ren combines her passions for the arts, sciences and dance to advocate for ocean conservation.