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Category archives for Animals

Biodiversity Hotspot in the ‘Burbs?

Lauren Bailey – Society for Conservation Biology Three years ago I moved with my family to Arlington, Virginia, minutes outside of the nation’s capital.  I can see Reagan National Airport from my front yard, the Washington Monument looms in the not-too-far distance, and a major boulevard is only a block from my house. And yet,…

The Causes Big and Small of the Sixth Mass Extinction

As we reach out across the planet and attempt to exploit it, for better or worse, the cost of our activities appears ever more burdensome. What could be driving such an obviously risky enterprise for our species?

Sixth Mass Extinction Really Started Thousands of Years Ago

The sixth mass extinction may have begun as a natural shift in the past, but it is increasingly a human problem in the present. In order to avert this recurring tragedy, humanity must learn from the extinctions of the past.

Arapaima Research Taking New Heights: Aerial Tracking

Guest post by Dr. Lesley de Souza, postdoctoral research associate, Shedd Aquarium For the past two years I have been studying Arapaima movements in the Rewa River drainage and tracking 29 individual Arapaima with Shedd Aquarium. A pattern has emerged highlighting that the majority of these tagged individuals are returning to the same place where they…

Inspiring Warriors to Conserve Lions in Kenya

Morans, the warrior age-class of the Samburu tribe, traditionally play a central role in protecting their communities and livestock from external threats, including predation by lions and other large carnivores. Yet, these young men represent one of the most neglected groups in conservation decision-making in northern Kenya. As a moran himself, Jeneria Lekilelei, Ewaso Lions’…

Achieving Sustainable Tuna

By Susan Jackson and Jennifer Dianto Kemmerly There is no endeavor quite like commercial tuna fishing. Perhaps no other industry is comprised of such a diverse group of stakeholders – with diverse opinions and approaches – that are so actively engaged in working toward a common goal. As many different voices weigh in to positively…

Tagging a Fish With a Sword for a Face

This isn’t your granddaddy’s day on the lake. Marine biologist Sam Friederichs fights 500­-pound fish—but not for the reason you’d think.

Journeying Oregon’s New Marine Reserves by Bike: Redfish Rocks

By Chris Rurik and Helen Helfand Part 1   Part 2   Part 3   Part 4   Part 5   Part 6 Our journey ends at Oregon’s southernmost marine reserve: Redfish Rocks. Leaving behind the rugged majesty of Cape Perpetua, we cycle 175 miles south, passing through sand dune country and the worn town…

10 Beautiful Birds of Prey Sighted in Uganda

Yvonne de Jong and Thomas Butynski are exploring northern Uganda to study primates, but that’s not all they’ve discovered. See what they found when they lifted their eyes to the skies.

Breach the Snake River Dams

By Kenneth Balcomb, guest essayist Note: In this guest essay, long-time killer whale researcher Ken Balcomb shows how obsolete but still salmon-killing dams are helping cause the decline of killer whales due to food shortage in the Northwest. The dams do feed us one thing: propaganda. As Ken wrote to me, “I was flabbergasted that…

New Tool To Monitor Harmful Bacteria at Beaches

An international team, led by researchers has developed a new, timelier method to identify harmful bacteria levels on recreational beaches. The new model provides beach managers with a better prediction tool to identify when closures are required to protect beachgoers from harmful contaminates in the water. “The development of this new model has allowed us,…

Threatened Corals Swap “Algae” Partners to Survive Warming Oceans

A new research study showed why threatened Caribbean star corals sometimes swap partners to help them recover from bleaching events. The findings are important to understand the fate of coral reefs as ocean waters warm due to climate change. The University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science research team placed colonies…

Bat-Survey Lesson No. 42: Don’t Step on Any Lions

Northwestern Namibia’s desert may appear barren, but it is full of life as the dry season and Young Explorers Grantee Theresa Laverty’s pilot field season conclude.

Can Wild Monkeys Hang With Humans?

Are the macaques of Gibraltar just manipulating tourists for free handouts, or is there more to this interspecies relationship? National Geographic’s Kyler Abernathy finds out.

Join Sylvia Earle 1,000 feet deep off Cocos Island

What’s it like to be with Sylvia Earle at the bottom of the sea? Find out in Beyond Blue, a new short film created by Kip Evans, Mission Blue’s director of expeditions and photography. National Geographic Society Explorer in Residence Dr. Sylvia Earle, called a Living Legend by the Library of Congress, first Hero for the…