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Category archives for Animals

Tazy: Speedy Dog of the Steppes in a Race Against Extinction

“Faster!” Zhylkybai Aga said. The driver increased the truck’s speed to 25 m.p.h. Zhylkybai leaned out the window and whooped at his dog, named Akbakai, who loped alongside the vehicle. The lanky dog was hardly exerting himself. My first impression of Tazy, a Kazakh dog breed, was that it looked like a bag of bones. But now, in…

Tasmanian Devils Are Cuter and More Clever Than You Think

Researchers get a new view of these feisty furballs and search for insights that could help the species survive a deadly cancer epidemic.

WATCH: Amur Tiger Cub Admitted to Rehabilitation Center Improving

Post written by Masha Vorontsova, IFAW Regional Director of Russia and CIS.  An orphaned female tiger cub found in the Russian Far East is currently being kept at the Center for Rehabilitation and Reintroduction of Tigers and Other Rare Animals near Vladivostok.

Tense Standoff With a Male Elephant in Mating Mode

National Geographic filmmaker Bob Poole encounters a giant bull elephant at the worst possible time … mating season. During this time male elephants are known for their aggressive and territorial nature, and Poole may be too close for comfort.

From Hunting Reserve to Wildlife Sanctuary

Post submitted by Matthias Fiechter, Communications Manager of Snow Leopard Trust. Kyrgyzstan tries a new approach to protect snow leopards and their prey. Conservationists and the government are teaming up to turn a hunting concession, where ibex were commercially hunted, into a co-managed nature reserve. The 100 square mile former concession area, Shamshy, in Kyrgyzstan’s northern…

50 Years Reversing the Effects of Invasive Rodents

The latest issue of the New Zealand Journal of Ecology just released documents how in fifty years the effects of invasive rodents have been reversed, along with some of the current exciting advances in rodent ecology and management.

The Haunting Origins of Horse Culture in Mongolia

Peer inside ancient burial mounds and discover a connection that goes back two thousand years before Genghis Khan.

Lions are Approaching! Early Lessons From Our Early- Warning System for Protecting Livestock and Lions

Post submitted by Andrew Stein.  It starts with an incoming text… “PrideInOurPrides- Lion 1 Inside Geofence 1. Follow the link for coordinates and mapped location.” It’s 10pm after a long day in the field and one of our collared lions has entered the marshy wetland between the safety of their tourist concession home and the…

Peru Affords Full Protection to World’s Largest Known Manta Population

In a significant move to safeguard the world’s largest known manta population, Peru’s Ministry of Production announced on January 1, strong regulations to protect the oceanic manta ray. It is now illegal to target, capture, and retain a manta ray or trade in any manta parts across their entire range, from Peru to Ecuador, where they are already legally protected.

Coral Restoration Research Findings Bring Positive News for the Future of Coral Reefs

Guest post by Mark Schick, collections manager, Shedd Aquarium There was grim news for the world’s coral reefs this October, when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) declared the third global coral bleaching in history. This event signifies major changes in oceanic living conditions and temperatures, some of which are brought upon by our…

Fighting Dynamite With Marine Protection in Borneo

This is the devastation left by blast fishing also called fish bombing, an illegal but rampant form of fishing here in the Coral Triangle. In the practice, a fisherman tosses dynamite, or homemade bombs made from a bottle filled with fertilizer and kerosene lit by a short fuse into the water. The blast kills or stuns all fish within the vicinity, which are easily collected for market. Dangerous to the reef, this method also maims and kills fishermen, and it is not uncommon to see men with fingers or hands missing. What is left behind is a wasteland of flattened coral rubble that can take decades or even centuries to recover.

Kikeo and The Whale

Kikeo and The Whale is a bedtime story that submerges the young reader in a sea of dreams. Hand-in-hand with National Geographic Creative photographer Kike Calvo, the reader discovers a beautiful story of an encounter between Kikeo, the main character,  and a baby whale and her mom. “This children’s book comes at a time when…

Leopards of India’s Silicon City

Post submitted by Sanjay Gubbi, Scientist Nature Conservation Foundation.   Bangalore, a southern Indian city, has become synonymous with information technology and is one of a few metropolis in the world that hosts large wild mammals such as elephants, leopards, sloth bears and even tigers within a distance of a few kilometers from the center of…

The (Questionably) Honorable Kazakh Tradition of Livestock Theft

With 2,500 head of livestock, it can be hard to notice when a few go missing. Especially for Dauletgali Zhaitapov, whose business Kaz Horse Mugalzhar LTD operates on 75,000 acres of unfenced rangeland in northern Kazakhstan. During fall roundup, Zhaitapov realized his horse herd was 100 animals short. These weren’t just any horses; they were…

Competition Between Carnivores: Untangling the Relationship Between Pumas, Black Bears, and Deer

By Max Allen of the Santa Cruz Puma Project Pumas and black bears are the two large carnivores found throughout California. Both species kill deer and other ungulates and as a result they often compete with each other. In Mendocino National Forest, where I completed my PhD project, black-tailed deer, including adults and fawns, make…